Array ( [Event] => Array ( [id] => 12584 [date] => 2014-06-20 [artist] => Fink [city] => Bratislava [state] => [country] => SK [venue] => BA City Beats [promoter] => [description] => [ticket_url] => http://www.bacitybeats.sk/ [image_upload_id] => 19211 [created] => 2014-02-25 10:38:31 [modified] => 2014-07-15 10:55:53 [year_slug] => 2014 [month_slug] => jun [day_slug] => 20 [slug] => fink-bratislava-ba-city-beats [description_clean] => [products_count] => 0 [hidden] => 0 [soldout] => 0 ) [Image] => Array ( [id] => 19211 [media_type] => image [artist] => Fink [title] => Fink Press Shot 2014 [credits] => [buy_link] => [filename] => images/fink/Fink-2014.jpg [checksum] => 8c04dfa03b2b4eb3efd1300f3c8d4029 [mime_type] => image/jpeg [size] => 111452 [external_url] => http://media.ninjatune.net/images/fink/Fink-2014.jpg [image_upload_id] => [first_track_id] => [first_release_id] => [listed] => 0 [active] => 0 [processed] => 1 [artist_slug] => fink [slug] => fink-press-shot-2014 [created] => 2014-03-21 14:03:53 [modified] => 2014-03-21 14:05:25 [embed] => ) [Country] => Array ( [id] => 189 [name] => Slovakia [longname] => Slovakia [numcode] => 703 [iso] => SK [iso3] => SVK [currency] => EUR [active] => 1 [parent_id] => 180 [lft] => 375 [rght] => 376 [level] => 2 ) [Product] => Array ( ) [Artist] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => 4 [name] => Fink [description] =>

Fin Greenall, who is the voice and heart behind Fink, often gets mistaken for other people. 

At the BMI Awards in the US, a ‘roomful of gangstas and playas’ were convinced the Cornwall-born, Bristol-raised Englishman was a lawyer, and not a songwriter picking up an ‘American Urban’ gong – one of three BMIs he received for his work with John Legend on the soul singer’s Evolver album.

In Berlin, clubbing capital of the world, they think he helps run a small minimal techno label. In certain London circles he’s known as the hardworking insider whose past roles at DefJam, Sony Music, Talkin’ Loud, and Source saw him work with a range of artists longer than the horizon. At the BBC, they imagine Fink as perhaps the only musician who has played both the Electric Proms and the actual Proms (was that really the same guy leading a 120-piece orchestra at the Royal Albert Hall in an ‘immense’ cover of Roy Ayers’ Everybody Loves The Sunshine?). 

In record company circles, he’s the producer who worked on the first demos by Amy Winehouse and the writer who’s been crafting hooks for Professor Green. In big-room booths around the world, he’s the internationally-renowned DJ and Ninja Tune stalwart who finally hung up his Sennheisers with a valedictory set at London’s Fabric in 2003. ‘My skillset just seemed so old compared to these guys that could DJ for six hours without one high-hat out of place using Ableton or something,’ he notes admiringly.

Who is Fin Greenall? All of the above. 

Yes, the now-Brighton-based musician acknowledges, he has done – does do – all of those things. ‘But none of that is as important as how I feel when I write songs like "Fear is Like Fire" and "Perfect Darkness". The Fink thing is my main thing.’

As a kid, the one thing of his dad’s that Fin Greenall wasn’t allowed to touch was the old Martin acoustic guitar. ‘It was his one possession where he said, “everything in this house is owned by everybody – apart from that.”’ But with age – and the burgeoning of his son’s skills as a player – came a relaxation of the exclusion zone: Greenall plays the Martin on the punchy, Jeff Buckley-covering-Radiohead-esque "Fear Is Like Fire". It’s sure to become a live stand-out on Fink’s upcoming, 18-month-long world tour. ‘It’s all about trying to look at fear and be optimistic – you can be really negative or fucking embrace it and use it. 

‘The great thing about growing up in a house where music is a big factor,’ he continues, ‘was the fact that music being part of your life was a perfectly natural thing.’ 

Music, it seems, became more than that: it was Greenall’s life. He hoovered up the sounds he heard on John Peel: ‘The Cure, The Smiths, The Orb, African music, Japanese hardcore’. He embraced skateboarding, the music and the fashion – ‘it was an awesome way to grow your own culture’. At university in Leeds, electronic and dance music became everything. 

‘It was definitely about wanting to be part of a revolution that I could call my own,’ he recalls. ‘A couple of friends and I clubbed together our student loans and bought equipment to make ambient techno – we were really inspired by Aphex Twin and The Orb and Moby. We were amazed at how fucking easy it was to make ambient techno. It wasn’t easy to make good ambient techno,’ he laughs. ‘But it was easy enough to make techno good enough to get us signed after six months of mucking around at uni.’ 

The young techno warrior was messianic. 

‘I thought the song was dead, the chorus was dead, playing drums and guitar and bass was so old-school and outdated and why would you want to do that? Dylan did that 50 years ago! We should be part of this new revolution, instrumentalism, acid house, rave culture, techno – this stuff is a brave new avant-garde frontier and you should be involved.’ 

His ardour and his skills saw Greenall become part of the Ninja Tune family – first signed on the back of a cassette-tape demo - as artist, DJ, writer, producer, and remixer. 

‘Brilliant times,’ he sighs nostalgically. ‘Sometimes you’d just have to pinch yourself. Then, other times, you wake up in Bratislava on a Tuesday morning and you’re reminded that there is hard work to all of this.’ All that crate-digging wasn’t all it’s cracked up to be either: ‘You can’t be shit!’ Greenall grins. ‘And because of the community that Ninja has worldwide, if you are shit everybody knows about it the next day. Eight years of DJing have given me an obscenely huge record collection. I just cleared out the breaks section – four crates of twelves that were total pony!’ 

So the wheels of steel started to fall off. 

‘It wasn’t until I’d run that right the way through to its natural conclusion – I’m an international DJ on the biggest DJ label in the world – that I thought: I’m kinda over it. And it was actually working with a young artist straight out of school called Amy Winehouse that inspired me to go, “wow, songs are great! Now I get how difficult it is, and how much talent there is involved in this. It’s more of a challenge than clubbing.”’ 

Greenall melted down his turntables and recast them as a guitar and a stool. Metaphorically speaking. His parents were pleased. ‘My career only made sense to them when I picked up a guitar and started to sing,’ he says. ‘All of a sudden I was doing music, I wasn’t just mucking around. But in my rave days, DJing techno and breaks, they didn’t get that at all. That’s probably why I did it in the first place. 

‘But I realised: if your music had songs in it, it had a much greater reach. Not in business terms, but if a singer of, say, Amy’s calibre sings over this beat, it becomes so much bigger than just a beat. I can’t get rid of my clubbing past, not that I’d want to. But the linear nature of some of my music is definitely because of all those years spent clubbing and DJing, when a very simple idea can make the best club record. And it’s the same with songs – I’m after a really simple riff or really simple lyric or melody. And it’s about keeping that beautiful moment going for as long as you can.’

[links] =>

Fink Website

Facebook
Twitter
Soundcloud

[image_upload_id] => 19785 [label_id] => 13 [twitter_username] => Finkmusic [instagram_id] => [instagram_username] => [link] => [listed] => 1 [sortname] => Fink [created] => 2010-07-17 22:15:58 [modified] => 2014-08-11 14:09:15 [slug] => fink [fuga_id] => [description_clean] =>

Fin Greenall, who is the voice and heart behind Fink, often gets mistaken for other people. 

At the BMI Awards in the US, a ‘roomful of gangstas and playas’ were convinced the Cornwall-born, Bristol-raised Englishman was a lawyer, and not a songwriter picking up an ‘American Urban’ gong – one of three BMIs he received for his work with John Legend on the soul singer’s Evolver album.

In Berlin, clubbing capital of the world, they think he helps run a small minimal techno label. In certain London circles he’s known as the hardworking insider whose past roles at DefJam, Sony Music, Talkin’ Loud, and Source saw him work with a range of artists longer than the horizon. At the BBC, they imagine Fink as perhaps the only musician who has played both the Electric Proms and the actual Proms (was that really the same guy leading a 120-piece orchestra at the Royal Albert Hall in an ‘immense’ cover of Roy Ayers’ Everybody Loves The Sunshine?). 

In record company circles, he’s the producer who worked on the first demos by Amy Winehouse and the writer who’s been crafting hooks for Professor Green. In big-room booths around the world, he’s the internationally-renowned DJ and Ninja Tune stalwart who finally hung up his Sennheisers with a valedictory set at London’s Fabric in 2003. ‘My skillset just seemed so old compared to these guys that could DJ for six hours without one high-hat out of place using Ableton or something,’ he notes admiringly.

Who is Fin Greenall? All of the above. 

Yes, the now-Brighton-based musician acknowledges, he has done – does do – all of those things. ‘But none of that is as important as how I feel when I write songs like "Fear is Like Fire" and "Perfect Darkness". The Fink thing is my main thing.’

As a kid, the one thing of his dad’s that Fin Greenall wasn’t allowed to touch was the old Martin acoustic guitar. ‘It was his one possession where he said, “everything in this house is owned by everybody – apart from that.”’ But with age – and the burgeoning of his son’s skills as a player – came a relaxation of the exclusion zone: Greenall plays the Martin on the punchy, Jeff Buckley-covering-Radiohead-esque "Fear Is Like Fire". It’s sure to become a live stand-out on Fink’s upcoming, 18-month-long world tour. ‘It’s all about trying to look at fear and be optimistic – you can be really negative or fucking embrace it and use it. 

‘The great thing about growing up in a house where music is a big factor,’ he continues, ‘was the fact that music being part of your life was a perfectly natural thing.’ 

Music, it seems, became more than that: it was Greenall’s life. He hoovered up the sounds he heard on John Peel: ‘The Cure, The Smiths, The Orb, African music, Japanese hardcore’. He embraced skateboarding, the music and the fashion – ‘it was an awesome way to grow your own culture’. At university in Leeds, electronic and dance music became everything. 

‘It was definitely about wanting to be part of a revolution that I could call my own,’ he recalls. ‘A couple of friends and I clubbed together our student loans and bought equipment to make ambient techno – we were really inspired by Aphex Twin and The Orb and Moby. We were amazed at how fucking easy it was to make ambient techno. It wasn’t easy to make good ambient techno,’ he laughs. ‘But it was easy enough to make techno good enough to get us signed after six months of mucking around at uni.’ 

The young techno warrior was messianic. 

‘I thought the song was dead, the chorus was dead, playing drums and guitar and bass was so old-school and outdated and why would you want to do that? Dylan did that 50 years ago! We should be part of this new revolution, instrumentalism, acid house, rave culture, techno – this stuff is a brave new avant-garde frontier and you should be involved.’ 

His ardour and his skills saw Greenall become part of the Ninja Tune family – first signed on the back of a cassette-tape demo - as artist, DJ, writer, producer, and remixer. 

‘Brilliant times,’ he sighs nostalgically. ‘Sometimes you’d just have to pinch yourself. Then, other times, you wake up in Bratislava on a Tuesday morning and you’re reminded that there is hard work to all of this.’ All that crate-digging wasn’t all it’s cracked up to be either: ‘You can’t be shit!’ Greenall grins. ‘And because of the community that Ninja has worldwide, if you are shit everybody knows about it the next day. Eight years of DJing have given me an obscenely huge record collection. I just cleared out the breaks section – four crates of twelves that were total pony!’ 

So the wheels of steel started to fall off. 

‘It wasn’t until I’d run that right the way through to its natural conclusion – I’m an international DJ on the biggest DJ label in the world – that I thought: I’m kinda over it. And it was actually working with a young artist straight out of school called Amy Winehouse that inspired me to go, “wow, songs are great! Now I get how difficult it is, and how much talent there is involved in this. It’s more of a challenge than clubbing.”’ 

Greenall melted down his turntables and recast them as a guitar and a stool. Metaphorically speaking. His parents were pleased. ‘My career only made sense to them when I picked up a guitar and started to sing,’ he says. ‘All of a sudden I was doing music, I wasn’t just mucking around. But in my rave days, DJing techno and breaks, they didn’t get that at all. That’s probably why I did it in the first place. 

‘But I realised: if your music had songs in it, it had a much greater reach. Not in business terms, but if a singer of, say, Amy’s calibre sings over this beat, it becomes so much bigger than just a beat. I can’t get rid of my clubbing past, not that I’d want to. But the linear nature of some of my music is definitely because of all those years spent clubbing and DJing, when a very simple idea can make the best club record. And it’s the same with songs – I’m after a really simple riff or really simple lyric or melody. And it’s about keeping that beautiful moment going for as long as you can.’

[links_clean] =>

Fink Website

Facebook
Twitter
Soundcloud

[counter_player] => [counter_biog] => ) ) ) [1] => Array ( [Event] => Array ( [id] => 12794 [date] => 2014-06-20 [artist] => Young Fathers [city] => Glasgow [state] => [country] => GB [venue] => World Refugee Day Concert [promoter] => [description] => [ticket_url] => https://etickets.glasgowconcerthalls.com/WEBPAGES/EntaWebEvent/EventSeatBlock.aspx [image_upload_id] => 19554 [created] => 2014-04-08 11:21:42 [modified] => 2014-06-13 12:45:20 [year_slug] => 2014 [month_slug] => jun [day_slug] => 20 [slug] => young-fathers-glasgow-world-refugee-day-concert [description_clean] => [products_count] => 0 [hidden] => 0 [soldout] => 0 ) [Image] => Array ( [id] => 19554 [media_type] => image [artist] => Young Fathers [title] => Young Fathers Summer 2014 tour flyer [credits] => [buy_link] => [filename] => images/young-fathers/YF-SUMMER-DATES430.jpg [checksum] => 0f7be6725c1bffb257906144f9c2989a [mime_type] => image/jpeg [size] => 124365 [external_url] => http://media.ninjatune.net/images/young-fathers/YF-SUMMER-DATES430.jpg [image_upload_id] => [first_track_id] => [first_release_id] => [listed] => 0 [active] => 1 [processed] => 1 [artist_slug] => young-fathers [slug] => young-fathers-summer-2014-tour-flyer [created] => 2014-06-13 12:41:00 [modified] => 2014-06-13 12:43:04 [embed] => ) [Country] => Array ( [id] => 208 [name] => United Kingdom [longname] => United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland [numcode] => 826 [iso] => GB [iso3] => GBR [currency] => GBP [active] => 1 [parent_id] => 191 [lft] => 413 [rght] => 414 [level] => 2 ) [Product] => Array ( ) [Artist] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => 198 [name] => Young Fathers [description] =>

Young Fathers were christened in 2008, named after the fact that all three members were named for their fathers..

They are:

‘G’ Hastings, from Drylaw, Edinburgh, Alloysious Massaquoi, originally from Liberia via Ghana and Kayus Bankole, born in Edinburgh to Nigerian parents but partially raised in Maryland in the USA, all 27 years old. Their live shows are complimented by Steven Morrison (drums & DJ) and Lauren Holt (AKA LAWholt - vocals).

The group formed after meeting at an under-16s hiphop night at the infamous Bongo Club in Edinburgh when they were all 14 years old. Almost immediately they started writing and recording together, initially on an old karoake machine plugged into a cheap cassette recorderat G’s parents house.

After going through various guises over several years and after hooking up with a local production company, they eventually settled on the name Young Fathers and recorded their first album with Tim Brinkhurst (AKA London) as producer. The recordings included their first single, Straight Back On It, which was given a limited release in 2009 and was received well enough to get them a couple of TV appearances, plays on BBC radio, some festival dates and the support slots with Simian Mobile Disco and Esser on UK tours.

Straight Back On It, a bang-on-the-money pop song built around Afrika Bambaataa’s reworking of Kraftwerk, was indicative of the rest of the album, Inconceivable Child… Conceived, in as much as the album was a state of the art teenage pop collection. Unfortunately the album was never released; however, another single, separately recorded, Automatic, was given a limited online release, but failed to have much impact.

In 2011 and after writing and recording yet another, unreleased album, the group decided a radical change was necessary and they finally disconnected themselves from the local production company and took control of their destiny. Recording mini-album (or ‘mixtape’ as it was called) TAPE ONE in just over a week, finishing a track a day and having it available for download within two weeks of recording gave them renewed vigour. They quickly followed this up by recording TAPE TWO in a similar fashion. Los Angeles based alt-hiphop label, Anticon, discovered them online and within a few months had signed them up for a short deal that saw both TAPEs officially released in 2013.

The group, meanwhile, continued to tour, gathering an impressive reputation as a fierce live act. They played all over Europe and made their US debut at SxSW in Austin, Texas, in March 2013.

Following support from the BBC’s Zane Lowe and Lauren Laverne, and an appearance on influential USA talk show, Jimmy Kimmel in 2014, TAPE TWO won Scottish Album Of The Year (‘The SAY Award’) and this was followed by their latest album, DEAD, released this time on Anticon in the USA and Big Dada in the UK and Europe, receiving the Mercury Award for best album of 2014. They won as the underdogs and there was a minor controversy because they didn’t look particularly joyful at the presentation and because they refused to speak to some of the more right wing press covering the event.

Immediately after winning the Mercury, YFs travelled to Berlin where they continued making their new album in a freezing basement in a building near the railway yards. Returning to the more familiar (and warmer) basement studio in Edinburgh where most of their recordings were made, to finish the album, they ended 2014 by playing a home town show at Edinburgh’s Hogmanay New year’s Eve festival in front of several thousand people.

The new album, White Men Are Black Men Too, has been recorded at various places around the world, including Melbourne and London as well as Berlin and Edinburgh and features the Leith Congregational Choir on a couple of tracks.

Young Fathers played over 140 shows during 2014, including On Blackheath Festival (curated by Massive Attack). They toured the UK, large swathes of Europe and did a six week stint in the USA. The new year already has them booked to play even more. White Men Are Black Men Too is due for release in April.

[links] => [image_upload_id] => 20542 [label_id] => 2 [twitter_username] => youngfathers [instagram_id] => [instagram_username] => [link] => [listed] => 1 [sortname] => Young Fathers [created] => 2013-10-18 16:52:18 [modified] => 2015-02-03 12:15:00 [slug] => young-fathers [fuga_id] => [description_clean] =>

Young Fathers were christened in 2008, named after the fact that all three members were named for their fathers..

They are:

‘G’ Hastings, from Drylaw, Edinburgh, Alloysious Massaquoi, originally from Liberia via Ghana and Kayus Bankole, born in Edinburgh to Nigerian parents but partially raised in Maryland in the USA, all 27 years old. Their live shows are complimented by Steven Morrison (drums & DJ) and Lauren Holt (AKA LAWholt - vocals).

The group formed after meeting at an under-16s hiphop night at the infamous Bongo Club in Edinburgh when they were all 14 years old. Almost immediately they started writing and recording together, initially on an old karoake machine plugged into a cheap cassette recorderat G’s parents house.

After going through various guises over several years and after hooking up with a local production company, they eventually settled on the name Young Fathers and recorded their first album with Tim Brinkhurst (AKA London) as producer. The recordings included their first single, Straight Back On It, which was given a limited release in 2009 and was received well enough to get them a couple of TV appearances, plays on BBC radio, some festival dates and the support slots with Simian Mobile Disco and Esser on UK tours.

Straight Back On It, a bang-on-the-money pop song built around Afrika Bambaataa’s reworking of Kraftwerk, was indicative of the rest of the album, Inconceivable Child… Conceived, in as much as the album was a state of the art teenage pop collection. Unfortunately the album was never released; however, another single, separately recorded, Automatic, was given a limited online release, but failed to have much impact.

In 2011 and after writing and recording yet another, unreleased album, the group decided a radical change was necessary and they finally disconnected themselves from the local production company and took control of their destiny. Recording mini-album (or ‘mixtape’ as it was called) TAPE ONE in just over a week, finishing a track a day and having it available for download within two weeks of recording gave them renewed vigour. They quickly followed this up by recording TAPE TWO in a similar fashion. Los Angeles based alt-hiphop label, Anticon, discovered them online and within a few months had signed them up for a short deal that saw both TAPEs officially released in 2013.

The group, meanwhile, continued to tour, gathering an impressive reputation as a fierce live act. They played all over Europe and made their US debut at SxSW in Austin, Texas, in March 2013.

Following support from the BBC’s Zane Lowe and Lauren Laverne, and an appearance on influential USA talk show, Jimmy Kimmel in 2014, TAPE TWO won Scottish Album Of The Year (‘The SAY Award’) and this was followed by their latest album, DEAD, released this time on Anticon in the USA and Big Dada in the UK and Europe, receiving the Mercury Award for best album of 2014. They won as the underdogs and there was a minor controversy because they didn’t look particularly joyful at the presentation and because they refused to speak to some of the more right wing press covering the event.

Immediately after winning the Mercury, YFs travelled to Berlin where they continued making their new album in a freezing basement in a building near the railway yards. Returning to the more familiar (and warmer) basement studio in Edinburgh where most of their recordings were made, to finish the album, they ended 2014 by playing a home town show at Edinburgh’s Hogmanay New year’s Eve festival in front of several thousand people.

The new album, White Men Are Black Men Too, has been recorded at various places around the world, including Melbourne and London as well as Berlin and Edinburgh and features the Leith Congregational Choir on a couple of tracks.

Young Fathers played over 140 shows during 2014, including On Blackheath Festival (curated by Massive Attack). They toured the UK, large swathes of Europe and did a six week stint in the USA. The new year already has them booked to play even more. White Men Are Black Men Too is due for release in April.

[links_clean] => [counter_player] => [counter_biog] => ) ) ) )
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