Dates

Array ( [Event] => Array ( [id] => 13624 [date] => 2015-02-01 [artist] => Fink [city] => Istanbul [state] => [country] => TU [venue] => Babylon Club [promoter] => [description] => [ticket_url] => http://www.biletix.com/etkinlik/SBA04/TURKIYE/tr [image_upload_id] => 19785 [created] => 2014-12-04 15:55:50 [modified] => 2014-12-04 15:55:50 [year_slug] => 2015 [month_slug] => feb [day_slug] => 1 [slug] => fink-istanbul-babylon-club [description_clean] => [products_count] => 0 [hidden] => 0 [soldout] => 0 ) [Image] => Array ( [id] => 19785 [media_type] => image [artist] => Fink [title] => Fink Artist Shot 2014 [credits] => [buy_link] => [filename] => images/fink/Fink-TommyNLance-2014-2-1.jpg [checksum] => f33ac1c81dca48ea7011bb0061a2d804 [mime_type] => image/jpeg [size] => 221775 [external_url] => http://media.ninjatune.net/images/fink/Fink-TommyNLance-2014-2-1.jpg [image_upload_id] => [first_track_id] => [first_release_id] => [listed] => 0 [active] => 1 [processed] => 1 [artist_slug] => fink [slug] => fink-artist-shot-2014 [created] => 2014-08-11 14:07:33 [modified] => 2014-08-11 14:10:27 [embed] => ) [Country] => Array ( [id] => 176 [name] => Turkey [longname] => Turkey [numcode] => 792 [iso] => TU [iso3] => TUR [currency] => GBP [active] => 1 [parent_id] => 160 [lft] => 349 [rght] => 350 [level] => 2 ) [Product] => Array ( ) [Artist] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => 4 [name] => Fink [description] =>

Fin Greenall, who is the voice and heart behind Fink, often gets mistaken for other people. 

At the BMI Awards in the US, a ‘roomful of gangstas and playas’ were convinced the Cornwall-born, Bristol-raised Englishman was a lawyer, and not a songwriter picking up an ‘American Urban’ gong – one of three BMIs he received for his work with John Legend on the soul singer’s Evolver album.

In Berlin, clubbing capital of the world, they think he helps run a small minimal techno label. In certain London circles he’s known as the hardworking insider whose past roles at DefJam, Sony Music, Talkin’ Loud, and Source saw him work with a range of artists longer than the horizon. At the BBC, they imagine Fink as perhaps the only musician who has played both the Electric Proms and the actual Proms (was that really the same guy leading a 120-piece orchestra at the Royal Albert Hall in an ‘immense’ cover of Roy Ayers’ Everybody Loves The Sunshine?). 

In record company circles, he’s the producer who worked on the first demos by Amy Winehouse and the writer who’s been crafting hooks for Professor Green. In big-room booths around the world, he’s the internationally-renowned DJ and Ninja Tune stalwart who finally hung up his Sennheisers with a valedictory set at London’s Fabric in 2003. ‘My skillset just seemed so old compared to these guys that could DJ for six hours without one high-hat out of place using Ableton or something,’ he notes admiringly.

Who is Fin Greenall? All of the above. 

Yes, the now-Brighton-based musician acknowledges, he has done – does do – all of those things. ‘But none of that is as important as how I feel when I write songs like "Fear is Like Fire" and "Perfect Darkness". The Fink thing is my main thing.’

As a kid, the one thing of his dad’s that Fin Greenall wasn’t allowed to touch was the old Martin acoustic guitar. ‘It was his one possession where he said, “everything in this house is owned by everybody – apart from that.”’ But with age – and the burgeoning of his son’s skills as a player – came a relaxation of the exclusion zone: Greenall plays the Martin on the punchy, Jeff Buckley-covering-Radiohead-esque "Fear Is Like Fire". It’s sure to become a live stand-out on Fink’s upcoming, 18-month-long world tour. ‘It’s all about trying to look at fear and be optimistic – you can be really negative or fucking embrace it and use it. 

‘The great thing about growing up in a house where music is a big factor,’ he continues, ‘was the fact that music being part of your life was a perfectly natural thing.’ 

Music, it seems, became more than that: it was Greenall’s life. He hoovered up the sounds he heard on John Peel: ‘The Cure, The Smiths, The Orb, African music, Japanese hardcore’. He embraced skateboarding, the music and the fashion – ‘it was an awesome way to grow your own culture’. At university in Leeds, electronic and dance music became everything. 

‘It was definitely about wanting to be part of a revolution that I could call my own,’ he recalls. ‘A couple of friends and I clubbed together our student loans and bought equipment to make ambient techno – we were really inspired by Aphex Twin and The Orb and Moby. We were amazed at how fucking easy it was to make ambient techno. It wasn’t easy to make good ambient techno,’ he laughs. ‘But it was easy enough to make techno good enough to get us signed after six months of mucking around at uni.’ 

The young techno warrior was messianic. 

‘I thought the song was dead, the chorus was dead, playing drums and guitar and bass was so old-school and outdated and why would you want to do that? Dylan did that 50 years ago! We should be part of this new revolution, instrumentalism, acid house, rave culture, techno – this stuff is a brave new avant-garde frontier and you should be involved.’ 

His ardour and his skills saw Greenall become part of the Ninja Tune family – first signed on the back of a cassette-tape demo - as artist, DJ, writer, producer, and remixer. 

‘Brilliant times,’ he sighs nostalgically. ‘Sometimes you’d just have to pinch yourself. Then, other times, you wake up in Bratislava on a Tuesday morning and you’re reminded that there is hard work to all of this.’ All that crate-digging wasn’t all it’s cracked up to be either: ‘You can’t be shit!’ Greenall grins. ‘And because of the community that Ninja has worldwide, if you are shit everybody knows about it the next day. Eight years of DJing have given me an obscenely huge record collection. I just cleared out the breaks section – four crates of twelves that were total pony!’ 

So the wheels of steel started to fall off. 

‘It wasn’t until I’d run that right the way through to its natural conclusion – I’m an international DJ on the biggest DJ label in the world – that I thought: I’m kinda over it. And it was actually working with a young artist straight out of school called Amy Winehouse that inspired me to go, “wow, songs are great! Now I get how difficult it is, and how much talent there is involved in this. It’s more of a challenge than clubbing.”’ 

Greenall melted down his turntables and recast them as a guitar and a stool. Metaphorically speaking. His parents were pleased. ‘My career only made sense to them when I picked up a guitar and started to sing,’ he says. ‘All of a sudden I was doing music, I wasn’t just mucking around. But in my rave days, DJing techno and breaks, they didn’t get that at all. That’s probably why I did it in the first place. 

‘But I realised: if your music had songs in it, it had a much greater reach. Not in business terms, but if a singer of, say, Amy’s calibre sings over this beat, it becomes so much bigger than just a beat. I can’t get rid of my clubbing past, not that I’d want to. But the linear nature of some of my music is definitely because of all those years spent clubbing and DJing, when a very simple idea can make the best club record. And it’s the same with songs – I’m after a really simple riff or really simple lyric or melody. And it’s about keeping that beautiful moment going for as long as you can.’

[links] =>

Fink Website

Facebook
Twitter
Soundcloud

[image_upload_id] => 19785 [label_id] => 13 [twitter_username] => Finkmusic [instagram_id] => [instagram_username] => [link] => [listed] => 1 [sortname] => Fink [created] => 2010-07-17 22:15:58 [modified] => 2014-08-11 14:09:15 [slug] => fink [fuga_id] => [description_clean] =>

Fin Greenall, who is the voice and heart behind Fink, often gets mistaken for other people. 

At the BMI Awards in the US, a ‘roomful of gangstas and playas’ were convinced the Cornwall-born, Bristol-raised Englishman was a lawyer, and not a songwriter picking up an ‘American Urban’ gong – one of three BMIs he received for his work with John Legend on the soul singer’s Evolver album.

In Berlin, clubbing capital of the world, they think he helps run a small minimal techno label. In certain London circles he’s known as the hardworking insider whose past roles at DefJam, Sony Music, Talkin’ Loud, and Source saw him work with a range of artists longer than the horizon. At the BBC, they imagine Fink as perhaps the only musician who has played both the Electric Proms and the actual Proms (was that really the same guy leading a 120-piece orchestra at the Royal Albert Hall in an ‘immense’ cover of Roy Ayers’ Everybody Loves The Sunshine?). 

In record company circles, he’s the producer who worked on the first demos by Amy Winehouse and the writer who’s been crafting hooks for Professor Green. In big-room booths around the world, he’s the internationally-renowned DJ and Ninja Tune stalwart who finally hung up his Sennheisers with a valedictory set at London’s Fabric in 2003. ‘My skillset just seemed so old compared to these guys that could DJ for six hours without one high-hat out of place using Ableton or something,’ he notes admiringly.

Who is Fin Greenall? All of the above. 

Yes, the now-Brighton-based musician acknowledges, he has done – does do – all of those things. ‘But none of that is as important as how I feel when I write songs like "Fear is Like Fire" and "Perfect Darkness". The Fink thing is my main thing.’

As a kid, the one thing of his dad’s that Fin Greenall wasn’t allowed to touch was the old Martin acoustic guitar. ‘It was his one possession where he said, “everything in this house is owned by everybody – apart from that.”’ But with age – and the burgeoning of his son’s skills as a player – came a relaxation of the exclusion zone: Greenall plays the Martin on the punchy, Jeff Buckley-covering-Radiohead-esque "Fear Is Like Fire". It’s sure to become a live stand-out on Fink’s upcoming, 18-month-long world tour. ‘It’s all about trying to look at fear and be optimistic – you can be really negative or fucking embrace it and use it. 

‘The great thing about growing up in a house where music is a big factor,’ he continues, ‘was the fact that music being part of your life was a perfectly natural thing.’ 

Music, it seems, became more than that: it was Greenall’s life. He hoovered up the sounds he heard on John Peel: ‘The Cure, The Smiths, The Orb, African music, Japanese hardcore’. He embraced skateboarding, the music and the fashion – ‘it was an awesome way to grow your own culture’. At university in Leeds, electronic and dance music became everything. 

‘It was definitely about wanting to be part of a revolution that I could call my own,’ he recalls. ‘A couple of friends and I clubbed together our student loans and bought equipment to make ambient techno – we were really inspired by Aphex Twin and The Orb and Moby. We were amazed at how fucking easy it was to make ambient techno. It wasn’t easy to make good ambient techno,’ he laughs. ‘But it was easy enough to make techno good enough to get us signed after six months of mucking around at uni.’ 

The young techno warrior was messianic. 

‘I thought the song was dead, the chorus was dead, playing drums and guitar and bass was so old-school and outdated and why would you want to do that? Dylan did that 50 years ago! We should be part of this new revolution, instrumentalism, acid house, rave culture, techno – this stuff is a brave new avant-garde frontier and you should be involved.’ 

His ardour and his skills saw Greenall become part of the Ninja Tune family – first signed on the back of a cassette-tape demo - as artist, DJ, writer, producer, and remixer. 

‘Brilliant times,’ he sighs nostalgically. ‘Sometimes you’d just have to pinch yourself. Then, other times, you wake up in Bratislava on a Tuesday morning and you’re reminded that there is hard work to all of this.’ All that crate-digging wasn’t all it’s cracked up to be either: ‘You can’t be shit!’ Greenall grins. ‘And because of the community that Ninja has worldwide, if you are shit everybody knows about it the next day. Eight years of DJing have given me an obscenely huge record collection. I just cleared out the breaks section – four crates of twelves that were total pony!’ 

So the wheels of steel started to fall off. 

‘It wasn’t until I’d run that right the way through to its natural conclusion – I’m an international DJ on the biggest DJ label in the world – that I thought: I’m kinda over it. And it was actually working with a young artist straight out of school called Amy Winehouse that inspired me to go, “wow, songs are great! Now I get how difficult it is, and how much talent there is involved in this. It’s more of a challenge than clubbing.”’ 

Greenall melted down his turntables and recast them as a guitar and a stool. Metaphorically speaking. His parents were pleased. ‘My career only made sense to them when I picked up a guitar and started to sing,’ he says. ‘All of a sudden I was doing music, I wasn’t just mucking around. But in my rave days, DJing techno and breaks, they didn’t get that at all. That’s probably why I did it in the first place. 

‘But I realised: if your music had songs in it, it had a much greater reach. Not in business terms, but if a singer of, say, Amy’s calibre sings over this beat, it becomes so much bigger than just a beat. I can’t get rid of my clubbing past, not that I’d want to. But the linear nature of some of my music is definitely because of all those years spent clubbing and DJing, when a very simple idea can make the best club record. And it’s the same with songs – I’m after a really simple riff or really simple lyric or melody. And it’s about keeping that beautiful moment going for as long as you can.’

[links_clean] =>

Fink Website

Facebook
Twitter
Soundcloud

[counter_player] => [counter_biog] => ) ) ) [1] => Array ( [Event] => Array ( [id] => 13626 [date] => 2015-02-02 [artist] => Fink [city] => Sofia [state] => [country] => BG [venue] => Sofia Live Club [promoter] => [description] => [ticket_url] => http://www.finkworld.co.uk/tickets/events/2-feb-15-fink-sofia-live-club [image_upload_id] => 19785 [created] => 2014-12-04 15:57:02 [modified] => 2014-12-04 15:57:02 [year_slug] => 2015 [month_slug] => feb [day_slug] => 2 [slug] => fink-sofia-sofia-live-club [description_clean] => [products_count] => 0 [hidden] => 0 [soldout] => 0 ) [Image] => Array ( [id] => 19785 [media_type] => image [artist] => Fink [title] => Fink Artist Shot 2014 [credits] => [buy_link] => [filename] => images/fink/Fink-TommyNLance-2014-2-1.jpg [checksum] => f33ac1c81dca48ea7011bb0061a2d804 [mime_type] => image/jpeg [size] => 221775 [external_url] => http://media.ninjatune.net/images/fink/Fink-TommyNLance-2014-2-1.jpg [image_upload_id] => [first_track_id] => [first_release_id] => [listed] => 0 [active] => 1 [processed] => 1 [artist_slug] => fink [slug] => fink-artist-shot-2014 [created] => 2014-08-11 14:07:33 [modified] => 2014-08-11 14:10:27 [embed] => ) [Country] => Array ( [id] => 182 [name] => Bulgaria [longname] => Bulgaria [numcode] => 100 [iso] => BG [iso3] => BGR [currency] => GBP [active] => 1 [parent_id] => 180 [lft] => 361 [rght] => 362 [level] => 2 ) [Product] => Array ( ) [Artist] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => 4 [name] => Fink [description] =>

Fin Greenall, who is the voice and heart behind Fink, often gets mistaken for other people. 

At the BMI Awards in the US, a ‘roomful of gangstas and playas’ were convinced the Cornwall-born, Bristol-raised Englishman was a lawyer, and not a songwriter picking up an ‘American Urban’ gong – one of three BMIs he received for his work with John Legend on the soul singer’s Evolver album.

In Berlin, clubbing capital of the world, they think he helps run a small minimal techno label. In certain London circles he’s known as the hardworking insider whose past roles at DefJam, Sony Music, Talkin’ Loud, and Source saw him work with a range of artists longer than the horizon. At the BBC, they imagine Fink as perhaps the only musician who has played both the Electric Proms and the actual Proms (was that really the same guy leading a 120-piece orchestra at the Royal Albert Hall in an ‘immense’ cover of Roy Ayers’ Everybody Loves The Sunshine?). 

In record company circles, he’s the producer who worked on the first demos by Amy Winehouse and the writer who’s been crafting hooks for Professor Green. In big-room booths around the world, he’s the internationally-renowned DJ and Ninja Tune stalwart who finally hung up his Sennheisers with a valedictory set at London’s Fabric in 2003. ‘My skillset just seemed so old compared to these guys that could DJ for six hours without one high-hat out of place using Ableton or something,’ he notes admiringly.

Who is Fin Greenall? All of the above. 

Yes, the now-Brighton-based musician acknowledges, he has done – does do – all of those things. ‘But none of that is as important as how I feel when I write songs like "Fear is Like Fire" and "Perfect Darkness". The Fink thing is my main thing.’

As a kid, the one thing of his dad’s that Fin Greenall wasn’t allowed to touch was the old Martin acoustic guitar. ‘It was his one possession where he said, “everything in this house is owned by everybody – apart from that.”’ But with age – and the burgeoning of his son’s skills as a player – came a relaxation of the exclusion zone: Greenall plays the Martin on the punchy, Jeff Buckley-covering-Radiohead-esque "Fear Is Like Fire". It’s sure to become a live stand-out on Fink’s upcoming, 18-month-long world tour. ‘It’s all about trying to look at fear and be optimistic – you can be really negative or fucking embrace it and use it. 

‘The great thing about growing up in a house where music is a big factor,’ he continues, ‘was the fact that music being part of your life was a perfectly natural thing.’ 

Music, it seems, became more than that: it was Greenall’s life. He hoovered up the sounds he heard on John Peel: ‘The Cure, The Smiths, The Orb, African music, Japanese hardcore’. He embraced skateboarding, the music and the fashion – ‘it was an awesome way to grow your own culture’. At university in Leeds, electronic and dance music became everything. 

‘It was definitely about wanting to be part of a revolution that I could call my own,’ he recalls. ‘A couple of friends and I clubbed together our student loans and bought equipment to make ambient techno – we were really inspired by Aphex Twin and The Orb and Moby. We were amazed at how fucking easy it was to make ambient techno. It wasn’t easy to make good ambient techno,’ he laughs. ‘But it was easy enough to make techno good enough to get us signed after six months of mucking around at uni.’ 

The young techno warrior was messianic. 

‘I thought the song was dead, the chorus was dead, playing drums and guitar and bass was so old-school and outdated and why would you want to do that? Dylan did that 50 years ago! We should be part of this new revolution, instrumentalism, acid house, rave culture, techno – this stuff is a brave new avant-garde frontier and you should be involved.’ 

His ardour and his skills saw Greenall become part of the Ninja Tune family – first signed on the back of a cassette-tape demo - as artist, DJ, writer, producer, and remixer. 

‘Brilliant times,’ he sighs nostalgically. ‘Sometimes you’d just have to pinch yourself. Then, other times, you wake up in Bratislava on a Tuesday morning and you’re reminded that there is hard work to all of this.’ All that crate-digging wasn’t all it’s cracked up to be either: ‘You can’t be shit!’ Greenall grins. ‘And because of the community that Ninja has worldwide, if you are shit everybody knows about it the next day. Eight years of DJing have given me an obscenely huge record collection. I just cleared out the breaks section – four crates of twelves that were total pony!’ 

So the wheels of steel started to fall off. 

‘It wasn’t until I’d run that right the way through to its natural conclusion – I’m an international DJ on the biggest DJ label in the world – that I thought: I’m kinda over it. And it was actually working with a young artist straight out of school called Amy Winehouse that inspired me to go, “wow, songs are great! Now I get how difficult it is, and how much talent there is involved in this. It’s more of a challenge than clubbing.”’ 

Greenall melted down his turntables and recast them as a guitar and a stool. Metaphorically speaking. His parents were pleased. ‘My career only made sense to them when I picked up a guitar and started to sing,’ he says. ‘All of a sudden I was doing music, I wasn’t just mucking around. But in my rave days, DJing techno and breaks, they didn’t get that at all. That’s probably why I did it in the first place. 

‘But I realised: if your music had songs in it, it had a much greater reach. Not in business terms, but if a singer of, say, Amy’s calibre sings over this beat, it becomes so much bigger than just a beat. I can’t get rid of my clubbing past, not that I’d want to. But the linear nature of some of my music is definitely because of all those years spent clubbing and DJing, when a very simple idea can make the best club record. And it’s the same with songs – I’m after a really simple riff or really simple lyric or melody. And it’s about keeping that beautiful moment going for as long as you can.’

[links] =>

Fink Website

Facebook
Twitter
Soundcloud

[image_upload_id] => 19785 [label_id] => 13 [twitter_username] => Finkmusic [instagram_id] => [instagram_username] => [link] => [listed] => 1 [sortname] => Fink [created] => 2010-07-17 22:15:58 [modified] => 2014-08-11 14:09:15 [slug] => fink [fuga_id] => [description_clean] =>

Fin Greenall, who is the voice and heart behind Fink, often gets mistaken for other people. 

At the BMI Awards in the US, a ‘roomful of gangstas and playas’ were convinced the Cornwall-born, Bristol-raised Englishman was a lawyer, and not a songwriter picking up an ‘American Urban’ gong – one of three BMIs he received for his work with John Legend on the soul singer’s Evolver album.

In Berlin, clubbing capital of the world, they think he helps run a small minimal techno label. In certain London circles he’s known as the hardworking insider whose past roles at DefJam, Sony Music, Talkin’ Loud, and Source saw him work with a range of artists longer than the horizon. At the BBC, they imagine Fink as perhaps the only musician who has played both the Electric Proms and the actual Proms (was that really the same guy leading a 120-piece orchestra at the Royal Albert Hall in an ‘immense’ cover of Roy Ayers’ Everybody Loves The Sunshine?). 

In record company circles, he’s the producer who worked on the first demos by Amy Winehouse and the writer who’s been crafting hooks for Professor Green. In big-room booths around the world, he’s the internationally-renowned DJ and Ninja Tune stalwart who finally hung up his Sennheisers with a valedictory set at London’s Fabric in 2003. ‘My skillset just seemed so old compared to these guys that could DJ for six hours without one high-hat out of place using Ableton or something,’ he notes admiringly.

Who is Fin Greenall? All of the above. 

Yes, the now-Brighton-based musician acknowledges, he has done – does do – all of those things. ‘But none of that is as important as how I feel when I write songs like "Fear is Like Fire" and "Perfect Darkness". The Fink thing is my main thing.’

As a kid, the one thing of his dad’s that Fin Greenall wasn’t allowed to touch was the old Martin acoustic guitar. ‘It was his one possession where he said, “everything in this house is owned by everybody – apart from that.”’ But with age – and the burgeoning of his son’s skills as a player – came a relaxation of the exclusion zone: Greenall plays the Martin on the punchy, Jeff Buckley-covering-Radiohead-esque "Fear Is Like Fire". It’s sure to become a live stand-out on Fink’s upcoming, 18-month-long world tour. ‘It’s all about trying to look at fear and be optimistic – you can be really negative or fucking embrace it and use it. 

‘The great thing about growing up in a house where music is a big factor,’ he continues, ‘was the fact that music being part of your life was a perfectly natural thing.’ 

Music, it seems, became more than that: it was Greenall’s life. He hoovered up the sounds he heard on John Peel: ‘The Cure, The Smiths, The Orb, African music, Japanese hardcore’. He embraced skateboarding, the music and the fashion – ‘it was an awesome way to grow your own culture’. At university in Leeds, electronic and dance music became everything. 

‘It was definitely about wanting to be part of a revolution that I could call my own,’ he recalls. ‘A couple of friends and I clubbed together our student loans and bought equipment to make ambient techno – we were really inspired by Aphex Twin and The Orb and Moby. We were amazed at how fucking easy it was to make ambient techno. It wasn’t easy to make good ambient techno,’ he laughs. ‘But it was easy enough to make techno good enough to get us signed after six months of mucking around at uni.’ 

The young techno warrior was messianic. 

‘I thought the song was dead, the chorus was dead, playing drums and guitar and bass was so old-school and outdated and why would you want to do that? Dylan did that 50 years ago! We should be part of this new revolution, instrumentalism, acid house, rave culture, techno – this stuff is a brave new avant-garde frontier and you should be involved.’ 

His ardour and his skills saw Greenall become part of the Ninja Tune family – first signed on the back of a cassette-tape demo - as artist, DJ, writer, producer, and remixer. 

‘Brilliant times,’ he sighs nostalgically. ‘Sometimes you’d just have to pinch yourself. Then, other times, you wake up in Bratislava on a Tuesday morning and you’re reminded that there is hard work to all of this.’ All that crate-digging wasn’t all it’s cracked up to be either: ‘You can’t be shit!’ Greenall grins. ‘And because of the community that Ninja has worldwide, if you are shit everybody knows about it the next day. Eight years of DJing have given me an obscenely huge record collection. I just cleared out the breaks section – four crates of twelves that were total pony!’ 

So the wheels of steel started to fall off. 

‘It wasn’t until I’d run that right the way through to its natural conclusion – I’m an international DJ on the biggest DJ label in the world – that I thought: I’m kinda over it. And it was actually working with a young artist straight out of school called Amy Winehouse that inspired me to go, “wow, songs are great! Now I get how difficult it is, and how much talent there is involved in this. It’s more of a challenge than clubbing.”’ 

Greenall melted down his turntables and recast them as a guitar and a stool. Metaphorically speaking. His parents were pleased. ‘My career only made sense to them when I picked up a guitar and started to sing,’ he says. ‘All of a sudden I was doing music, I wasn’t just mucking around. But in my rave days, DJing techno and breaks, they didn’t get that at all. That’s probably why I did it in the first place. 

‘But I realised: if your music had songs in it, it had a much greater reach. Not in business terms, but if a singer of, say, Amy’s calibre sings over this beat, it becomes so much bigger than just a beat. I can’t get rid of my clubbing past, not that I’d want to. But the linear nature of some of my music is definitely because of all those years spent clubbing and DJing, when a very simple idea can make the best club record. And it’s the same with songs – I’m after a really simple riff or really simple lyric or melody. And it’s about keeping that beautiful moment going for as long as you can.’

[links_clean] =>

Fink Website

Facebook
Twitter
Soundcloud

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Busdriver is fixed as one of LA music’s most dynamic indie artist. From his years as a cyher phenom at Project Blowed to his years as a recording artist on Epitaph to his current role as co-head of Hellfyre Club, Busdriver has always challenged rap in the most particular and thoughful of ways.

BD’s first record, Memoirs of the Elephantman, was self released thru Afterlife records (a Project Blowed subcrew at the time)in 1999. Not until his second self-released record, Temporary Forever, came out in 2002 did Busdriver step on the world stage. Sleeper hit "Imaginary Places" turned him into one of many beacons of left-leaning hip-hop at the moment. During this time he was also emceeing at the Hiphop/Drum’n’bass night weekly Concrete Jungle with Daddy Kev, Myka 9, edit and DJ Hive.

After the new success of Temporary Forever, Busdriver signed with Mush records to do a collaborative album with beat/production guru Daedelus and quirky rap talent Radioinactive in 2003. The project was called ‘The Weather’. Their album toyed with daring disjointed production and dexterous rap writing in a way that Busdriver hadn’t in the past. The project amassed a small cult following all its own and aligned Driver’s taste with the output of LA’s electronic music scene.

In 2004, Busdriver began his relationship with Big Dada by releasing with them the Daddy Kev-produced mini-LP, Cosmic Cleavage. This was followed by Busdriver’s official 3rd album, Fear of a Black Tangent, released via Big Dada in the EU and on Mush in the US.

Busdriver’s label dealings grew outside of the rap arena in 2007 when he signed to indie-punk mega-label Epitaph and eventually, it’s more indie-music driven sister label, Anti-. Through them he released RoadKillOvercoat in 2007 and Jhellibeam in 2009. Both albums featured production from DJ Nobody, Nosaj Thing, Free the Robots and Boom Bip. During these years, rap producer culture was in flux in LA and the newly founded Low End Theory began gaining momentum. Producer eDIT (who becomes the head of Glitch Mob) featured Busdriver on "Crunk De Gaulle" (also featuring TTC) off his Alpha Pup debut, Certified Air Raid Material.

Computer Cooties came out in 2010 after BD parted with Anti-. It was a free mixtape featuring collaborations with Flying Lotus, Anti-Pop Consortium, Sister Crayon, Daedelus and Open Mike Eagle. He followed this by joining Hellfyre Club and forming Flash Bang Grenada, a two-man group made of Nocando (founder of Hellfyre Club and original resident of Low End Theory) and himself, created solely to let their musings on popular rap themes run amok. They released their debut 10 Haters in 2011.

In 2012, BD released Beaus$Eros through Fake Four. The album was produced entirely by Loden and had features from Cocorosie and Mike Ladd. It was a departure from rap writing into microclimates of experimental pop but then completely not also. The record was coupled with Regan Farquhar aka Busdriver(Driver) fronting an progressive power pop outfit briefly called Physiccal Forms.

That same year Driver released Arguments with Dreams, an EP marking a return to Big Dada. It was mostly self-produced with stand-out appearances from Das Racist on “Firehydrant” and HFC members Nocando and Mike Eagle on “Wernor Herzog”.

In 2013, Driver helmed and oversaw the production of Dorner Vs. Tookie, the joint mixtape featuring efforts from all the members of Hellfyre Club (Nocando, Busdriver, Open Mike Eagle, milo, Rheteric Ramirez, Kail, VerBS, Taurus Scott, The Kleerz). While doing this Busdriver completed his 8th proper studio album, Perfect Hair. The album features production from Mono/Poly, Jeremiah Jae, Great Dane, Kenny Segal and Riley Lake with guest performances from Danny Brown, Aesop Rock and Mike Eagle. A follow up mixtape from Hellfyre Club in collaboration with producer collective Team Supreme is planned for 2014. But it is only it is pre-production stages now.

More recently Driver has done collaborations with Modeselektor, Son Lux, Latyrx, Kool AD, Lapalux, Sonnymoon, P.O.S, and others on various albums.

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Dorner Vs. Tookie Mixtape

[image_upload_id] => 19576 [label_id] => 2 [twitter_username] => Busdriverr [instagram_id] => 7648195 [instagram_username] => busdriverr [link] => [listed] => 1 [sortname] => Busdriver [created] => 2010-07-17 22:15:58 [modified] => 2014-06-16 17:41:15 [slug] => busdriver [fuga_id] => [description_clean] =>

Busdriver is fixed as one of LA music’s most dynamic indie artist. From his years as a cyher phenom at Project Blowed to his years as a recording artist on Epitaph to his current role as co-head of Hellfyre Club, Busdriver has always challenged rap in the most particular and thoughful of ways.

BD’s first record, Memoirs of the Elephantman, was self released thru Afterlife records (a Project Blowed subcrew at the time)in 1999. Not until his second self-released record, Temporary Forever, came out in 2002 did Busdriver step on the world stage. Sleeper hit "Imaginary Places" turned him into one of many beacons of left-leaning hip-hop at the moment. During this time he was also emceeing at the Hiphop/Drum’n’bass night weekly Concrete Jungle with Daddy Kev, Myka 9, edit and DJ Hive.

After the new success of Temporary Forever, Busdriver signed with Mush records to do a collaborative album with beat/production guru Daedelus and quirky rap talent Radioinactive in 2003. The project was called ‘The Weather’. Their album toyed with daring disjointed production and dexterous rap writing in a way that Busdriver hadn’t in the past. The project amassed a small cult following all its own and aligned Driver’s taste with the output of LA’s electronic music scene.

In 2004, Busdriver began his relationship with Big Dada by releasing with them the Daddy Kev-produced mini-LP, Cosmic Cleavage. This was followed by Busdriver’s official 3rd album, Fear of a Black Tangent, released via Big Dada in the EU and on Mush in the US.

Busdriver’s label dealings grew outside of the rap arena in 2007 when he signed to indie-punk mega-label Epitaph and eventually, it’s more indie-music driven sister label, Anti-. Through them he released RoadKillOvercoat in 2007 and Jhellibeam in 2009. Both albums featured production from DJ Nobody, Nosaj Thing, Free the Robots and Boom Bip. During these years, rap producer culture was in flux in LA and the newly founded Low End Theory began gaining momentum. Producer eDIT (who becomes the head of Glitch Mob) featured Busdriver on "Crunk De Gaulle" (also featuring TTC) off his Alpha Pup debut, Certified Air Raid Material.

Computer Cooties came out in 2010 after BD parted with Anti-. It was a free mixtape featuring collaborations with Flying Lotus, Anti-Pop Consortium, Sister Crayon, Daedelus and Open Mike Eagle. He followed this by joining Hellfyre Club and forming Flash Bang Grenada, a two-man group made of Nocando (founder of Hellfyre Club and original resident of Low End Theory) and himself, created solely to let their musings on popular rap themes run amok. They released their debut 10 Haters in 2011.

In 2012, BD released Beaus$Eros through Fake Four. The album was produced entirely by Loden and had features from Cocorosie and Mike Ladd. It was a departure from rap writing into microclimates of experimental pop but then completely not also. The record was coupled with Regan Farquhar aka Busdriver(Driver) fronting an progressive power pop outfit briefly called Physiccal Forms.

That same year Driver released Arguments with Dreams, an EP marking a return to Big Dada. It was mostly self-produced with stand-out appearances from Das Racist on “Firehydrant” and HFC members Nocando and Mike Eagle on “Wernor Herzog”.

In 2013, Driver helmed and oversaw the production of Dorner Vs. Tookie, the joint mixtape featuring efforts from all the members of Hellfyre Club (Nocando, Busdriver, Open Mike Eagle, milo, Rheteric Ramirez, Kail, VerBS, Taurus Scott, The Kleerz). While doing this Busdriver completed his 8th proper studio album, Perfect Hair. The album features production from Mono/Poly, Jeremiah Jae, Great Dane, Kenny Segal and Riley Lake with guest performances from Danny Brown, Aesop Rock and Mike Eagle. A follow up mixtape from Hellfyre Club in collaboration with producer collective Team Supreme is planned for 2014. But it is only it is pre-production stages now.

More recently Driver has done collaborations with Modeselektor, Son Lux, Latyrx, Kool AD, Lapalux, Sonnymoon, P.O.S, and others on various albums.

[links_clean] =>

Facebook
Twitter
SoundCloud
Dorner Vs. Tookie Mixtape

[counter_player] => [counter_biog] => ) ) ) [3] => Array ( [Event] => Array ( [id] => 13627 [date] => 2015-02-04 [artist] => Fink [city] => Bucharest [state] => [country] => RO [venue] => Silver Church [promoter] => [description] => [ticket_url] => http://www.finkworld.co.uk/tickets/events/4-feb-15-fink-silver-church [image_upload_id] => 19785 [created] => 2014-12-04 15:58:30 [modified] => 2014-12-04 15:58:30 [year_slug] => 2015 [month_slug] => feb [day_slug] => 4 [slug] => fink-bucharest-silver-church [description_clean] => [products_count] => 0 [hidden] => 0 [soldout] => 0 ) [Image] => Array ( [id] => 19785 [media_type] => image [artist] => Fink [title] => Fink Artist Shot 2014 [credits] => [buy_link] => [filename] => images/fink/Fink-TommyNLance-2014-2-1.jpg [checksum] => f33ac1c81dca48ea7011bb0061a2d804 [mime_type] => image/jpeg [size] => 221775 [external_url] => http://media.ninjatune.net/images/fink/Fink-TommyNLance-2014-2-1.jpg [image_upload_id] => [first_track_id] => [first_release_id] => [listed] => 0 [active] => 1 [processed] => 1 [artist_slug] => fink [slug] => fink-artist-shot-2014 [created] => 2014-08-11 14:07:33 [modified] => 2014-08-11 14:10:27 [embed] => ) [Country] => Array ( [id] => 187 [name] => Romania [longname] => Romania [numcode] => 642 [iso] => RO [iso3] => ROM [currency] => GBP [active] => 1 [parent_id] => 180 [lft] => 371 [rght] => 372 [level] => 2 ) [Product] => Array ( ) [Artist] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => 4 [name] => Fink [description] =>

Fin Greenall, who is the voice and heart behind Fink, often gets mistaken for other people. 

At the BMI Awards in the US, a ‘roomful of gangstas and playas’ were convinced the Cornwall-born, Bristol-raised Englishman was a lawyer, and not a songwriter picking up an ‘American Urban’ gong – one of three BMIs he received for his work with John Legend on the soul singer’s Evolver album.

In Berlin, clubbing capital of the world, they think he helps run a small minimal techno label. In certain London circles he’s known as the hardworking insider whose past roles at DefJam, Sony Music, Talkin’ Loud, and Source saw him work with a range of artists longer than the horizon. At the BBC, they imagine Fink as perhaps the only musician who has played both the Electric Proms and the actual Proms (was that really the same guy leading a 120-piece orchestra at the Royal Albert Hall in an ‘immense’ cover of Roy Ayers’ Everybody Loves The Sunshine?). 

In record company circles, he’s the producer who worked on the first demos by Amy Winehouse and the writer who’s been crafting hooks for Professor Green. In big-room booths around the world, he’s the internationally-renowned DJ and Ninja Tune stalwart who finally hung up his Sennheisers with a valedictory set at London’s Fabric in 2003. ‘My skillset just seemed so old compared to these guys that could DJ for six hours without one high-hat out of place using Ableton or something,’ he notes admiringly.

Who is Fin Greenall? All of the above. 

Yes, the now-Brighton-based musician acknowledges, he has done – does do – all of those things. ‘But none of that is as important as how I feel when I write songs like "Fear is Like Fire" and "Perfect Darkness". The Fink thing is my main thing.’

As a kid, the one thing of his dad’s that Fin Greenall wasn’t allowed to touch was the old Martin acoustic guitar. ‘It was his one possession where he said, “everything in this house is owned by everybody – apart from that.”’ But with age – and the burgeoning of his son’s skills as a player – came a relaxation of the exclusion zone: Greenall plays the Martin on the punchy, Jeff Buckley-covering-Radiohead-esque "Fear Is Like Fire". It’s sure to become a live stand-out on Fink’s upcoming, 18-month-long world tour. ‘It’s all about trying to look at fear and be optimistic – you can be really negative or fucking embrace it and use it. 

‘The great thing about growing up in a house where music is a big factor,’ he continues, ‘was the fact that music being part of your life was a perfectly natural thing.’ 

Music, it seems, became more than that: it was Greenall’s life. He hoovered up the sounds he heard on John Peel: ‘The Cure, The Smiths, The Orb, African music, Japanese hardcore’. He embraced skateboarding, the music and the fashion – ‘it was an awesome way to grow your own culture’. At university in Leeds, electronic and dance music became everything. 

‘It was definitely about wanting to be part of a revolution that I could call my own,’ he recalls. ‘A couple of friends and I clubbed together our student loans and bought equipment to make ambient techno – we were really inspired by Aphex Twin and The Orb and Moby. We were amazed at how fucking easy it was to make ambient techno. It wasn’t easy to make good ambient techno,’ he laughs. ‘But it was easy enough to make techno good enough to get us signed after six months of mucking around at uni.’ 

The young techno warrior was messianic. 

‘I thought the song was dead, the chorus was dead, playing drums and guitar and bass was so old-school and outdated and why would you want to do that? Dylan did that 50 years ago! We should be part of this new revolution, instrumentalism, acid house, rave culture, techno – this stuff is a brave new avant-garde frontier and you should be involved.’ 

His ardour and his skills saw Greenall become part of the Ninja Tune family – first signed on the back of a cassette-tape demo - as artist, DJ, writer, producer, and remixer. 

‘Brilliant times,’ he sighs nostalgically. ‘Sometimes you’d just have to pinch yourself. Then, other times, you wake up in Bratislava on a Tuesday morning and you’re reminded that there is hard work to all of this.’ All that crate-digging wasn’t all it’s cracked up to be either: ‘You can’t be shit!’ Greenall grins. ‘And because of the community that Ninja has worldwide, if you are shit everybody knows about it the next day. Eight years of DJing have given me an obscenely huge record collection. I just cleared out the breaks section – four crates of twelves that were total pony!’ 

So the wheels of steel started to fall off. 

‘It wasn’t until I’d run that right the way through to its natural conclusion – I’m an international DJ on the biggest DJ label in the world – that I thought: I’m kinda over it. And it was actually working with a young artist straight out of school called Amy Winehouse that inspired me to go, “wow, songs are great! Now I get how difficult it is, and how much talent there is involved in this. It’s more of a challenge than clubbing.”’ 

Greenall melted down his turntables and recast them as a guitar and a stool. Metaphorically speaking. His parents were pleased. ‘My career only made sense to them when I picked up a guitar and started to sing,’ he says. ‘All of a sudden I was doing music, I wasn’t just mucking around. But in my rave days, DJing techno and breaks, they didn’t get that at all. That’s probably why I did it in the first place. 

‘But I realised: if your music had songs in it, it had a much greater reach. Not in business terms, but if a singer of, say, Amy’s calibre sings over this beat, it becomes so much bigger than just a beat. I can’t get rid of my clubbing past, not that I’d want to. But the linear nature of some of my music is definitely because of all those years spent clubbing and DJing, when a very simple idea can make the best club record. And it’s the same with songs – I’m after a really simple riff or really simple lyric or melody. And it’s about keeping that beautiful moment going for as long as you can.’

[links] =>

Fink Website

Facebook
Twitter
Soundcloud

[image_upload_id] => 19785 [label_id] => 13 [twitter_username] => Finkmusic [instagram_id] => [instagram_username] => [link] => [listed] => 1 [sortname] => Fink [created] => 2010-07-17 22:15:58 [modified] => 2014-08-11 14:09:15 [slug] => fink [fuga_id] => [description_clean] =>

Fin Greenall, who is the voice and heart behind Fink, often gets mistaken for other people. 

At the BMI Awards in the US, a ‘roomful of gangstas and playas’ were convinced the Cornwall-born, Bristol-raised Englishman was a lawyer, and not a songwriter picking up an ‘American Urban’ gong – one of three BMIs he received for his work with John Legend on the soul singer’s Evolver album.

In Berlin, clubbing capital of the world, they think he helps run a small minimal techno label. In certain London circles he’s known as the hardworking insider whose past roles at DefJam, Sony Music, Talkin’ Loud, and Source saw him work with a range of artists longer than the horizon. At the BBC, they imagine Fink as perhaps the only musician who has played both the Electric Proms and the actual Proms (was that really the same guy leading a 120-piece orchestra at the Royal Albert Hall in an ‘immense’ cover of Roy Ayers’ Everybody Loves The Sunshine?). 

In record company circles, he’s the producer who worked on the first demos by Amy Winehouse and the writer who’s been crafting hooks for Professor Green. In big-room booths around the world, he’s the internationally-renowned DJ and Ninja Tune stalwart who finally hung up his Sennheisers with a valedictory set at London’s Fabric in 2003. ‘My skillset just seemed so old compared to these guys that could DJ for six hours without one high-hat out of place using Ableton or something,’ he notes admiringly.

Who is Fin Greenall? All of the above. 

Yes, the now-Brighton-based musician acknowledges, he has done – does do – all of those things. ‘But none of that is as important as how I feel when I write songs like "Fear is Like Fire" and "Perfect Darkness". The Fink thing is my main thing.’

As a kid, the one thing of his dad’s that Fin Greenall wasn’t allowed to touch was the old Martin acoustic guitar. ‘It was his one possession where he said, “everything in this house is owned by everybody – apart from that.”’ But with age – and the burgeoning of his son’s skills as a player – came a relaxation of the exclusion zone: Greenall plays the Martin on the punchy, Jeff Buckley-covering-Radiohead-esque "Fear Is Like Fire". It’s sure to become a live stand-out on Fink’s upcoming, 18-month-long world tour. ‘It’s all about trying to look at fear and be optimistic – you can be really negative or fucking embrace it and use it. 

‘The great thing about growing up in a house where music is a big factor,’ he continues, ‘was the fact that music being part of your life was a perfectly natural thing.’ 

Music, it seems, became more than that: it was Greenall’s life. He hoovered up the sounds he heard on John Peel: ‘The Cure, The Smiths, The Orb, African music, Japanese hardcore’. He embraced skateboarding, the music and the fashion – ‘it was an awesome way to grow your own culture’. At university in Leeds, electronic and dance music became everything. 

‘It was definitely about wanting to be part of a revolution that I could call my own,’ he recalls. ‘A couple of friends and I clubbed together our student loans and bought equipment to make ambient techno – we were really inspired by Aphex Twin and The Orb and Moby. We were amazed at how fucking easy it was to make ambient techno. It wasn’t easy to make good ambient techno,’ he laughs. ‘But it was easy enough to make techno good enough to get us signed after six months of mucking around at uni.’ 

The young techno warrior was messianic. 

‘I thought the song was dead, the chorus was dead, playing drums and guitar and bass was so old-school and outdated and why would you want to do that? Dylan did that 50 years ago! We should be part of this new revolution, instrumentalism, acid house, rave culture, techno – this stuff is a brave new avant-garde frontier and you should be involved.’ 

His ardour and his skills saw Greenall become part of the Ninja Tune family – first signed on the back of a cassette-tape demo - as artist, DJ, writer, producer, and remixer. 

‘Brilliant times,’ he sighs nostalgically. ‘Sometimes you’d just have to pinch yourself. Then, other times, you wake up in Bratislava on a Tuesday morning and you’re reminded that there is hard work to all of this.’ All that crate-digging wasn’t all it’s cracked up to be either: ‘You can’t be shit!’ Greenall grins. ‘And because of the community that Ninja has worldwide, if you are shit everybody knows about it the next day. Eight years of DJing have given me an obscenely huge record collection. I just cleared out the breaks section – four crates of twelves that were total pony!’ 

So the wheels of steel started to fall off. 

‘It wasn’t until I’d run that right the way through to its natural conclusion – I’m an international DJ on the biggest DJ label in the world – that I thought: I’m kinda over it. And it was actually working with a young artist straight out of school called Amy Winehouse that inspired me to go, “wow, songs are great! Now I get how difficult it is, and how much talent there is involved in this. It’s more of a challenge than clubbing.”’ 

Greenall melted down his turntables and recast them as a guitar and a stool. Metaphorically speaking. His parents were pleased. ‘My career only made sense to them when I picked up a guitar and started to sing,’ he says. ‘All of a sudden I was doing music, I wasn’t just mucking around. But in my rave days, DJing techno and breaks, they didn’t get that at all. That’s probably why I did it in the first place. 

‘But I realised: if your music had songs in it, it had a much greater reach. Not in business terms, but if a singer of, say, Amy’s calibre sings over this beat, it becomes so much bigger than just a beat. I can’t get rid of my clubbing past, not that I’d want to. But the linear nature of some of my music is definitely because of all those years spent clubbing and DJing, when a very simple idea can make the best club record. And it’s the same with songs – I’m after a really simple riff or really simple lyric or melody. And it’s about keeping that beautiful moment going for as long as you can.’

[links_clean] =>

Fink Website

Facebook
Twitter
Soundcloud

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Busdriver is fixed as one of LA music’s most dynamic indie artist. From his years as a cyher phenom at Project Blowed to his years as a recording artist on Epitaph to his current role as co-head of Hellfyre Club, Busdriver has always challenged rap in the most particular and thoughful of ways.

BD’s first record, Memoirs of the Elephantman, was self released thru Afterlife records (a Project Blowed subcrew at the time)in 1999. Not until his second self-released record, Temporary Forever, came out in 2002 did Busdriver step on the world stage. Sleeper hit "Imaginary Places" turned him into one of many beacons of left-leaning hip-hop at the moment. During this time he was also emceeing at the Hiphop/Drum’n’bass night weekly Concrete Jungle with Daddy Kev, Myka 9, edit and DJ Hive.

After the new success of Temporary Forever, Busdriver signed with Mush records to do a collaborative album with beat/production guru Daedelus and quirky rap talent Radioinactive in 2003. The project was called ‘The Weather’. Their album toyed with daring disjointed production and dexterous rap writing in a way that Busdriver hadn’t in the past. The project amassed a small cult following all its own and aligned Driver’s taste with the output of LA’s electronic music scene.

In 2004, Busdriver began his relationship with Big Dada by releasing with them the Daddy Kev-produced mini-LP, Cosmic Cleavage. This was followed by Busdriver’s official 3rd album, Fear of a Black Tangent, released via Big Dada in the EU and on Mush in the US.

Busdriver’s label dealings grew outside of the rap arena in 2007 when he signed to indie-punk mega-label Epitaph and eventually, it’s more indie-music driven sister label, Anti-. Through them he released RoadKillOvercoat in 2007 and Jhellibeam in 2009. Both albums featured production from DJ Nobody, Nosaj Thing, Free the Robots and Boom Bip. During these years, rap producer culture was in flux in LA and the newly founded Low End Theory began gaining momentum. Producer eDIT (who becomes the head of Glitch Mob) featured Busdriver on "Crunk De Gaulle" (also featuring TTC) off his Alpha Pup debut, Certified Air Raid Material.

Computer Cooties came out in 2010 after BD parted with Anti-. It was a free mixtape featuring collaborations with Flying Lotus, Anti-Pop Consortium, Sister Crayon, Daedelus and Open Mike Eagle. He followed this by joining Hellfyre Club and forming Flash Bang Grenada, a two-man group made of Nocando (founder of Hellfyre Club and original resident of Low End Theory) and himself, created solely to let their musings on popular rap themes run amok. They released their debut 10 Haters in 2011.

In 2012, BD released Beaus$Eros through Fake Four. The album was produced entirely by Loden and had features from Cocorosie and Mike Ladd. It was a departure from rap writing into microclimates of experimental pop but then completely not also. The record was coupled with Regan Farquhar aka Busdriver(Driver) fronting an progressive power pop outfit briefly called Physiccal Forms.

That same year Driver released Arguments with Dreams, an EP marking a return to Big Dada. It was mostly self-produced with stand-out appearances from Das Racist on “Firehydrant” and HFC members Nocando and Mike Eagle on “Wernor Herzog”.

In 2013, Driver helmed and oversaw the production of Dorner Vs. Tookie, the joint mixtape featuring efforts from all the members of Hellfyre Club (Nocando, Busdriver, Open Mike Eagle, milo, Rheteric Ramirez, Kail, VerBS, Taurus Scott, The Kleerz). While doing this Busdriver completed his 8th proper studio album, Perfect Hair. The album features production from Mono/Poly, Jeremiah Jae, Great Dane, Kenny Segal and Riley Lake with guest performances from Danny Brown, Aesop Rock and Mike Eagle. A follow up mixtape from Hellfyre Club in collaboration with producer collective Team Supreme is planned for 2014. But it is only it is pre-production stages now.

More recently Driver has done collaborations with Modeselektor, Son Lux, Latyrx, Kool AD, Lapalux, Sonnymoon, P.O.S, and others on various albums.

[links] =>

Facebook
Twitter
SoundCloud
Dorner Vs. Tookie Mixtape

[image_upload_id] => 19576 [label_id] => 2 [twitter_username] => Busdriverr [instagram_id] => 7648195 [instagram_username] => busdriverr [link] => [listed] => 1 [sortname] => Busdriver [created] => 2010-07-17 22:15:58 [modified] => 2014-06-16 17:41:15 [slug] => busdriver [fuga_id] => [description_clean] =>

Busdriver is fixed as one of LA music’s most dynamic indie artist. From his years as a cyher phenom at Project Blowed to his years as a recording artist on Epitaph to his current role as co-head of Hellfyre Club, Busdriver has always challenged rap in the most particular and thoughful of ways.

BD’s first record, Memoirs of the Elephantman, was self released thru Afterlife records (a Project Blowed subcrew at the time)in 1999. Not until his second self-released record, Temporary Forever, came out in 2002 did Busdriver step on the world stage. Sleeper hit "Imaginary Places" turned him into one of many beacons of left-leaning hip-hop at the moment. During this time he was also emceeing at the Hiphop/Drum’n’bass night weekly Concrete Jungle with Daddy Kev, Myka 9, edit and DJ Hive.

After the new success of Temporary Forever, Busdriver signed with Mush records to do a collaborative album with beat/production guru Daedelus and quirky rap talent Radioinactive in 2003. The project was called ‘The Weather’. Their album toyed with daring disjointed production and dexterous rap writing in a way that Busdriver hadn’t in the past. The project amassed a small cult following all its own and aligned Driver’s taste with the output of LA’s electronic music scene.

In 2004, Busdriver began his relationship with Big Dada by releasing with them the Daddy Kev-produced mini-LP, Cosmic Cleavage. This was followed by Busdriver’s official 3rd album, Fear of a Black Tangent, released via Big Dada in the EU and on Mush in the US.

Busdriver’s label dealings grew outside of the rap arena in 2007 when he signed to indie-punk mega-label Epitaph and eventually, it’s more indie-music driven sister label, Anti-. Through them he released RoadKillOvercoat in 2007 and Jhellibeam in 2009. Both albums featured production from DJ Nobody, Nosaj Thing, Free the Robots and Boom Bip. During these years, rap producer culture was in flux in LA and the newly founded Low End Theory began gaining momentum. Producer eDIT (who becomes the head of Glitch Mob) featured Busdriver on "Crunk De Gaulle" (also featuring TTC) off his Alpha Pup debut, Certified Air Raid Material.

Computer Cooties came out in 2010 after BD parted with Anti-. It was a free mixtape featuring collaborations with Flying Lotus, Anti-Pop Consortium, Sister Crayon, Daedelus and Open Mike Eagle. He followed this by joining Hellfyre Club and forming Flash Bang Grenada, a two-man group made of Nocando (founder of Hellfyre Club and original resident of Low End Theory) and himself, created solely to let their musings on popular rap themes run amok. They released their debut 10 Haters in 2011.

In 2012, BD released Beaus$Eros through Fake Four. The album was produced entirely by Loden and had features from Cocorosie and Mike Ladd. It was a departure from rap writing into microclimates of experimental pop but then completely not also. The record was coupled with Regan Farquhar aka Busdriver(Driver) fronting an progressive power pop outfit briefly called Physiccal Forms.

That same year Driver released Arguments with Dreams, an EP marking a return to Big Dada. It was mostly self-produced with stand-out appearances from Das Racist on “Firehydrant” and HFC members Nocando and Mike Eagle on “Wernor Herzog”.

In 2013, Driver helmed and oversaw the production of Dorner Vs. Tookie, the joint mixtape featuring efforts from all the members of Hellfyre Club (Nocando, Busdriver, Open Mike Eagle, milo, Rheteric Ramirez, Kail, VerBS, Taurus Scott, The Kleerz). While doing this Busdriver completed his 8th proper studio album, Perfect Hair. The album features production from Mono/Poly, Jeremiah Jae, Great Dane, Kenny Segal and Riley Lake with guest performances from Danny Brown, Aesop Rock and Mike Eagle. A follow up mixtape from Hellfyre Club in collaboration with producer collective Team Supreme is planned for 2014. But it is only it is pre-production stages now.

More recently Driver has done collaborations with Modeselektor, Son Lux, Latyrx, Kool AD, Lapalux, Sonnymoon, P.O.S, and others on various albums.

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Dorner Vs. Tookie Mixtape

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Fin Greenall, who is the voice and heart behind Fink, often gets mistaken for other people. 

At the BMI Awards in the US, a ‘roomful of gangstas and playas’ were convinced the Cornwall-born, Bristol-raised Englishman was a lawyer, and not a songwriter picking up an ‘American Urban’ gong – one of three BMIs he received for his work with John Legend on the soul singer’s Evolver album.

In Berlin, clubbing capital of the world, they think he helps run a small minimal techno label. In certain London circles he’s known as the hardworking insider whose past roles at DefJam, Sony Music, Talkin’ Loud, and Source saw him work with a range of artists longer than the horizon. At the BBC, they imagine Fink as perhaps the only musician who has played both the Electric Proms and the actual Proms (was that really the same guy leading a 120-piece orchestra at the Royal Albert Hall in an ‘immense’ cover of Roy Ayers’ Everybody Loves The Sunshine?). 

In record company circles, he’s the producer who worked on the first demos by Amy Winehouse and the writer who’s been crafting hooks for Professor Green. In big-room booths around the world, he’s the internationally-renowned DJ and Ninja Tune stalwart who finally hung up his Sennheisers with a valedictory set at London’s Fabric in 2003. ‘My skillset just seemed so old compared to these guys that could DJ for six hours without one high-hat out of place using Ableton or something,’ he notes admiringly.

Who is Fin Greenall? All of the above. 

Yes, the now-Brighton-based musician acknowledges, he has done – does do – all of those things. ‘But none of that is as important as how I feel when I write songs like "Fear is Like Fire" and "Perfect Darkness". The Fink thing is my main thing.’

As a kid, the one thing of his dad’s that Fin Greenall wasn’t allowed to touch was the old Martin acoustic guitar. ‘It was his one possession where he said, “everything in this house is owned by everybody – apart from that.”’ But with age – and the burgeoning of his son’s skills as a player – came a relaxation of the exclusion zone: Greenall plays the Martin on the punchy, Jeff Buckley-covering-Radiohead-esque "Fear Is Like Fire". It’s sure to become a live stand-out on Fink’s upcoming, 18-month-long world tour. ‘It’s all about trying to look at fear and be optimistic – you can be really negative or fucking embrace it and use it. 

‘The great thing about growing up in a house where music is a big factor,’ he continues, ‘was the fact that music being part of your life was a perfectly natural thing.’ 

Music, it seems, became more than that: it was Greenall’s life. He hoovered up the sounds he heard on John Peel: ‘The Cure, The Smiths, The Orb, African music, Japanese hardcore’. He embraced skateboarding, the music and the fashion – ‘it was an awesome way to grow your own culture’. At university in Leeds, electronic and dance music became everything. 

‘It was definitely about wanting to be part of a revolution that I could call my own,’ he recalls. ‘A couple of friends and I clubbed together our student loans and bought equipment to make ambient techno – we were really inspired by Aphex Twin and The Orb and Moby. We were amazed at how fucking easy it was to make ambient techno. It wasn’t easy to make good ambient techno,’ he laughs. ‘But it was easy enough to make techno good enough to get us signed after six months of mucking around at uni.’ 

The young techno warrior was messianic. 

‘I thought the song was dead, the chorus was dead, playing drums and guitar and bass was so old-school and outdated and why would you want to do that? Dylan did that 50 years ago! We should be part of this new revolution, instrumentalism, acid house, rave culture, techno – this stuff is a brave new avant-garde frontier and you should be involved.’ 

His ardour and his skills saw Greenall become part of the Ninja Tune family – first signed on the back of a cassette-tape demo - as artist, DJ, writer, producer, and remixer. 

‘Brilliant times,’ he sighs nostalgically. ‘Sometimes you’d just have to pinch yourself. Then, other times, you wake up in Bratislava on a Tuesday morning and you’re reminded that there is hard work to all of this.’ All that crate-digging wasn’t all it’s cracked up to be either: ‘You can’t be shit!’ Greenall grins. ‘And because of the community that Ninja has worldwide, if you are shit everybody knows about it the next day. Eight years of DJing have given me an obscenely huge record collection. I just cleared out the breaks section – four crates of twelves that were total pony!’ 

So the wheels of steel started to fall off. 

‘It wasn’t until I’d run that right the way through to its natural conclusion – I’m an international DJ on the biggest DJ label in the world – that I thought: I’m kinda over it. And it was actually working with a young artist straight out of school called Amy Winehouse that inspired me to go, “wow, songs are great! Now I get how difficult it is, and how much talent there is involved in this. It’s more of a challenge than clubbing.”’ 

Greenall melted down his turntables and recast them as a guitar and a stool. Metaphorically speaking. His parents were pleased. ‘My career only made sense to them when I picked up a guitar and started to sing,’ he says. ‘All of a sudden I was doing music, I wasn’t just mucking around. But in my rave days, DJing techno and breaks, they didn’t get that at all. That’s probably why I did it in the first place. 

‘But I realised: if your music had songs in it, it had a much greater reach. Not in business terms, but if a singer of, say, Amy’s calibre sings over this beat, it becomes so much bigger than just a beat. I can’t get rid of my clubbing past, not that I’d want to. But the linear nature of some of my music is definitely because of all those years spent clubbing and DJing, when a very simple idea can make the best club record. And it’s the same with songs – I’m after a really simple riff or really simple lyric or melody. And it’s about keeping that beautiful moment going for as long as you can.’

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[image_upload_id] => 19785 [label_id] => 13 [twitter_username] => Finkmusic [instagram_id] => [instagram_username] => [link] => [listed] => 1 [sortname] => Fink [created] => 2010-07-17 22:15:58 [modified] => 2014-08-11 14:09:15 [slug] => fink [fuga_id] => [description_clean] =>

Fin Greenall, who is the voice and heart behind Fink, often gets mistaken for other people. 

At the BMI Awards in the US, a ‘roomful of gangstas and playas’ were convinced the Cornwall-born, Bristol-raised Englishman was a lawyer, and not a songwriter picking up an ‘American Urban’ gong – one of three BMIs he received for his work with John Legend on the soul singer’s Evolver album.

In Berlin, clubbing capital of the world, they think he helps run a small minimal techno label. In certain London circles he’s known as the hardworking insider whose past roles at DefJam, Sony Music, Talkin’ Loud, and Source saw him work with a range of artists longer than the horizon. At the BBC, they imagine Fink as perhaps the only musician who has played both the Electric Proms and the actual Proms (was that really the same guy leading a 120-piece orchestra at the Royal Albert Hall in an ‘immense’ cover of Roy Ayers’ Everybody Loves The Sunshine?). 

In record company circles, he’s the producer who worked on the first demos by Amy Winehouse and the writer who’s been crafting hooks for Professor Green. In big-room booths around the world, he’s the internationally-renowned DJ and Ninja Tune stalwart who finally hung up his Sennheisers with a valedictory set at London’s Fabric in 2003. ‘My skillset just seemed so old compared to these guys that could DJ for six hours without one high-hat out of place using Ableton or something,’ he notes admiringly.

Who is Fin Greenall? All of the above. 

Yes, the now-Brighton-based musician acknowledges, he has done – does do – all of those things. ‘But none of that is as important as how I feel when I write songs like "Fear is Like Fire" and "Perfect Darkness". The Fink thing is my main thing.’

As a kid, the one thing of his dad’s that Fin Greenall wasn’t allowed to touch was the old Martin acoustic guitar. ‘It was his one possession where he said, “everything in this house is owned by everybody – apart from that.”’ But with age – and the burgeoning of his son’s skills as a player – came a relaxation of the exclusion zone: Greenall plays the Martin on the punchy, Jeff Buckley-covering-Radiohead-esque "Fear Is Like Fire". It’s sure to become a live stand-out on Fink’s upcoming, 18-month-long world tour. ‘It’s all about trying to look at fear and be optimistic – you can be really negative or fucking embrace it and use it. 

‘The great thing about growing up in a house where music is a big factor,’ he continues, ‘was the fact that music being part of your life was a perfectly natural thing.’ 

Music, it seems, became more than that: it was Greenall’s life. He hoovered up the sounds he heard on John Peel: ‘The Cure, The Smiths, The Orb, African music, Japanese hardcore’. He embraced skateboarding, the music and the fashion – ‘it was an awesome way to grow your own culture’. At university in Leeds, electronic and dance music became everything. 

‘It was definitely about wanting to be part of a revolution that I could call my own,’ he recalls. ‘A couple of friends and I clubbed together our student loans and bought equipment to make ambient techno – we were really inspired by Aphex Twin and The Orb and Moby. We were amazed at how fucking easy it was to make ambient techno. It wasn’t easy to make good ambient techno,’ he laughs. ‘But it was easy enough to make techno good enough to get us signed after six months of mucking around at uni.’ 

The young techno warrior was messianic. 

‘I thought the song was dead, the chorus was dead, playing drums and guitar and bass was so old-school and outdated and why would you want to do that? Dylan did that 50 years ago! We should be part of this new revolution, instrumentalism, acid house, rave culture, techno – this stuff is a brave new avant-garde frontier and you should be involved.’ 

His ardour and his skills saw Greenall become part of the Ninja Tune family – first signed on the back of a cassette-tape demo - as artist, DJ, writer, producer, and remixer. 

‘Brilliant times,’ he sighs nostalgically. ‘Sometimes you’d just have to pinch yourself. Then, other times, you wake up in Bratislava on a Tuesday morning and you’re reminded that there is hard work to all of this.’ All that crate-digging wasn’t all it’s cracked up to be either: ‘You can’t be shit!’ Greenall grins. ‘And because of the community that Ninja has worldwide, if you are shit everybody knows about it the next day. Eight years of DJing have given me an obscenely huge record collection. I just cleared out the breaks section – four crates of twelves that were total pony!’ 

So the wheels of steel started to fall off. 

‘It wasn’t until I’d run that right the way through to its natural conclusion – I’m an international DJ on the biggest DJ label in the world – that I thought: I’m kinda over it. And it was actually working with a young artist straight out of school called Amy Winehouse that inspired me to go, “wow, songs are great! Now I get how difficult it is, and how much talent there is involved in this. It’s more of a challenge than clubbing.”’ 

Greenall melted down his turntables and recast them as a guitar and a stool. Metaphorically speaking. His parents were pleased. ‘My career only made sense to them when I picked up a guitar and started to sing,’ he says. ‘All of a sudden I was doing music, I wasn’t just mucking around. But in my rave days, DJing techno and breaks, they didn’t get that at all. That’s probably why I did it in the first place. 

‘But I realised: if your music had songs in it, it had a much greater reach. Not in business terms, but if a singer of, say, Amy’s calibre sings over this beat, it becomes so much bigger than just a beat. I can’t get rid of my clubbing past, not that I’d want to. But the linear nature of some of my music is definitely because of all those years spent clubbing and DJing, when a very simple idea can make the best club record. And it’s the same with songs – I’m after a really simple riff or really simple lyric or melody. And it’s about keeping that beautiful moment going for as long as you can.’

[links_clean] =>

Fink Website

Facebook
Twitter
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Busdriver is fixed as one of LA music’s most dynamic indie artist. From his years as a cyher phenom at Project Blowed to his years as a recording artist on Epitaph to his current role as co-head of Hellfyre Club, Busdriver has always challenged rap in the most particular and thoughful of ways.

BD’s first record, Memoirs of the Elephantman, was self released thru Afterlife records (a Project Blowed subcrew at the time)in 1999. Not until his second self-released record, Temporary Forever, came out in 2002 did Busdriver step on the world stage. Sleeper hit "Imaginary Places" turned him into one of many beacons of left-leaning hip-hop at the moment. During this time he was also emceeing at the Hiphop/Drum’n’bass night weekly Concrete Jungle with Daddy Kev, Myka 9, edit and DJ Hive.

After the new success of Temporary Forever, Busdriver signed with Mush records to do a collaborative album with beat/production guru Daedelus and quirky rap talent Radioinactive in 2003. The project was called ‘The Weather’. Their album toyed with daring disjointed production and dexterous rap writing in a way that Busdriver hadn’t in the past. The project amassed a small cult following all its own and aligned Driver’s taste with the output of LA’s electronic music scene.

In 2004, Busdriver began his relationship with Big Dada by releasing with them the Daddy Kev-produced mini-LP, Cosmic Cleavage. This was followed by Busdriver’s official 3rd album, Fear of a Black Tangent, released via Big Dada in the EU and on Mush in the US.

Busdriver’s label dealings grew outside of the rap arena in 2007 when he signed to indie-punk mega-label Epitaph and eventually, it’s more indie-music driven sister label, Anti-. Through them he released RoadKillOvercoat in 2007 and Jhellibeam in 2009. Both albums featured production from DJ Nobody, Nosaj Thing, Free the Robots and Boom Bip. During these years, rap producer culture was in flux in LA and the newly founded Low End Theory began gaining momentum. Producer eDIT (who becomes the head of Glitch Mob) featured Busdriver on "Crunk De Gaulle" (also featuring TTC) off his Alpha Pup debut, Certified Air Raid Material.

Computer Cooties came out in 2010 after BD parted with Anti-. It was a free mixtape featuring collaborations with Flying Lotus, Anti-Pop Consortium, Sister Crayon, Daedelus and Open Mike Eagle. He followed this by joining Hellfyre Club and forming Flash Bang Grenada, a two-man group made of Nocando (founder of Hellfyre Club and original resident of Low End Theory) and himself, created solely to let their musings on popular rap themes run amok. They released their debut 10 Haters in 2011.

In 2012, BD released Beaus$Eros through Fake Four. The album was produced entirely by Loden and had features from Cocorosie and Mike Ladd. It was a departure from rap writing into microclimates of experimental pop but then completely not also. The record was coupled with Regan Farquhar aka Busdriver(Driver) fronting an progressive power pop outfit briefly called Physiccal Forms.

That same year Driver released Arguments with Dreams, an EP marking a return to Big Dada. It was mostly self-produced with stand-out appearances from Das Racist on “Firehydrant” and HFC members Nocando and Mike Eagle on “Wernor Herzog”.

In 2013, Driver helmed and oversaw the production of Dorner Vs. Tookie, the joint mixtape featuring efforts from all the members of Hellfyre Club (Nocando, Busdriver, Open Mike Eagle, milo, Rheteric Ramirez, Kail, VerBS, Taurus Scott, The Kleerz). While doing this Busdriver completed his 8th proper studio album, Perfect Hair. The album features production from Mono/Poly, Jeremiah Jae, Great Dane, Kenny Segal and Riley Lake with guest performances from Danny Brown, Aesop Rock and Mike Eagle. A follow up mixtape from Hellfyre Club in collaboration with producer collective Team Supreme is planned for 2014. But it is only it is pre-production stages now.

More recently Driver has done collaborations with Modeselektor, Son Lux, Latyrx, Kool AD, Lapalux, Sonnymoon, P.O.S, and others on various albums.

[links] =>

Facebook
Twitter
SoundCloud
Dorner Vs. Tookie Mixtape

[image_upload_id] => 19576 [label_id] => 2 [twitter_username] => Busdriverr [instagram_id] => 7648195 [instagram_username] => busdriverr [link] => [listed] => 1 [sortname] => Busdriver [created] => 2010-07-17 22:15:58 [modified] => 2014-06-16 17:41:15 [slug] => busdriver [fuga_id] => [description_clean] =>

Busdriver is fixed as one of LA music’s most dynamic indie artist. From his years as a cyher phenom at Project Blowed to his years as a recording artist on Epitaph to his current role as co-head of Hellfyre Club, Busdriver has always challenged rap in the most particular and thoughful of ways.

BD’s first record, Memoirs of the Elephantman, was self released thru Afterlife records (a Project Blowed subcrew at the time)in 1999. Not until his second self-released record, Temporary Forever, came out in 2002 did Busdriver step on the world stage. Sleeper hit "Imaginary Places" turned him into one of many beacons of left-leaning hip-hop at the moment. During this time he was also emceeing at the Hiphop/Drum’n’bass night weekly Concrete Jungle with Daddy Kev, Myka 9, edit and DJ Hive.

After the new success of Temporary Forever, Busdriver signed with Mush records to do a collaborative album with beat/production guru Daedelus and quirky rap talent Radioinactive in 2003. The project was called ‘The Weather’. Their album toyed with daring disjointed production and dexterous rap writing in a way that Busdriver hadn’t in the past. The project amassed a small cult following all its own and aligned Driver’s taste with the output of LA’s electronic music scene.

In 2004, Busdriver began his relationship with Big Dada by releasing with them the Daddy Kev-produced mini-LP, Cosmic Cleavage. This was followed by Busdriver’s official 3rd album, Fear of a Black Tangent, released via Big Dada in the EU and on Mush in the US.

Busdriver’s label dealings grew outside of the rap arena in 2007 when he signed to indie-punk mega-label Epitaph and eventually, it’s more indie-music driven sister label, Anti-. Through them he released RoadKillOvercoat in 2007 and Jhellibeam in 2009. Both albums featured production from DJ Nobody, Nosaj Thing, Free the Robots and Boom Bip. During these years, rap producer culture was in flux in LA and the newly founded Low End Theory began gaining momentum. Producer eDIT (who becomes the head of Glitch Mob) featured Busdriver on "Crunk De Gaulle" (also featuring TTC) off his Alpha Pup debut, Certified Air Raid Material.

Computer Cooties came out in 2010 after BD parted with Anti-. It was a free mixtape featuring collaborations with Flying Lotus, Anti-Pop Consortium, Sister Crayon, Daedelus and Open Mike Eagle. He followed this by joining Hellfyre Club and forming Flash Bang Grenada, a two-man group made of Nocando (founder of Hellfyre Club and original resident of Low End Theory) and himself, created solely to let their musings on popular rap themes run amok. They released their debut 10 Haters in 2011.

In 2012, BD released Beaus$Eros through Fake Four. The album was produced entirely by Loden and had features from Cocorosie and Mike Ladd. It was a departure from rap writing into microclimates of experimental pop but then completely not also. The record was coupled with Regan Farquhar aka Busdriver(Driver) fronting an progressive power pop outfit briefly called Physiccal Forms.

That same year Driver released Arguments with Dreams, an EP marking a return to Big Dada. It was mostly self-produced with stand-out appearances from Das Racist on “Firehydrant” and HFC members Nocando and Mike Eagle on “Wernor Herzog”.

In 2013, Driver helmed and oversaw the production of Dorner Vs. Tookie, the joint mixtape featuring efforts from all the members of Hellfyre Club (Nocando, Busdriver, Open Mike Eagle, milo, Rheteric Ramirez, Kail, VerBS, Taurus Scott, The Kleerz). While doing this Busdriver completed his 8th proper studio album, Perfect Hair. The album features production from Mono/Poly, Jeremiah Jae, Great Dane, Kenny Segal and Riley Lake with guest performances from Danny Brown, Aesop Rock and Mike Eagle. A follow up mixtape from Hellfyre Club in collaboration with producer collective Team Supreme is planned for 2014. But it is only it is pre-production stages now.

More recently Driver has done collaborations with Modeselektor, Son Lux, Latyrx, Kool AD, Lapalux, Sonnymoon, P.O.S, and others on various albums.

[links_clean] =>

Facebook
Twitter
SoundCloud
Dorner Vs. Tookie Mixtape

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Fin Greenall, who is the voice and heart behind Fink, often gets mistaken for other people. 

At the BMI Awards in the US, a ‘roomful of gangstas and playas’ were convinced the Cornwall-born, Bristol-raised Englishman was a lawyer, and not a songwriter picking up an ‘American Urban’ gong – one of three BMIs he received for his work with John Legend on the soul singer’s Evolver album.

In Berlin, clubbing capital of the world, they think he helps run a small minimal techno label. In certain London circles he’s known as the hardworking insider whose past roles at DefJam, Sony Music, Talkin’ Loud, and Source saw him work with a range of artists longer than the horizon. At the BBC, they imagine Fink as perhaps the only musician who has played both the Electric Proms and the actual Proms (was that really the same guy leading a 120-piece orchestra at the Royal Albert Hall in an ‘immense’ cover of Roy Ayers’ Everybody Loves The Sunshine?). 

In record company circles, he’s the producer who worked on the first demos by Amy Winehouse and the writer who’s been crafting hooks for Professor Green. In big-room booths around the world, he’s the internationally-renowned DJ and Ninja Tune stalwart who finally hung up his Sennheisers with a valedictory set at London’s Fabric in 2003. ‘My skillset just seemed so old compared to these guys that could DJ for six hours without one high-hat out of place using Ableton or something,’ he notes admiringly.

Who is Fin Greenall? All of the above. 

Yes, the now-Brighton-based musician acknowledges, he has done – does do – all of those things. ‘But none of that is as important as how I feel when I write songs like "Fear is Like Fire" and "Perfect Darkness". The Fink thing is my main thing.’

As a kid, the one thing of his dad’s that Fin Greenall wasn’t allowed to touch was the old Martin acoustic guitar. ‘It was his one possession where he said, “everything in this house is owned by everybody – apart from that.”’ But with age – and the burgeoning of his son’s skills as a player – came a relaxation of the exclusion zone: Greenall plays the Martin on the punchy, Jeff Buckley-covering-Radiohead-esque "Fear Is Like Fire". It’s sure to become a live stand-out on Fink’s upcoming, 18-month-long world tour. ‘It’s all about trying to look at fear and be optimistic – you can be really negative or fucking embrace it and use it. 

‘The great thing about growing up in a house where music is a big factor,’ he continues, ‘was the fact that music being part of your life was a perfectly natural thing.’ 

Music, it seems, became more than that: it was Greenall’s life. He hoovered up the sounds he heard on John Peel: ‘The Cure, The Smiths, The Orb, African music, Japanese hardcore’. He embraced skateboarding, the music and the fashion – ‘it was an awesome way to grow your own culture’. At university in Leeds, electronic and dance music became everything. 

‘It was definitely about wanting to be part of a revolution that I could call my own,’ he recalls. ‘A couple of friends and I clubbed together our student loans and bought equipment to make ambient techno – we were really inspired by Aphex Twin and The Orb and Moby. We were amazed at how fucking easy it was to make ambient techno. It wasn’t easy to make good ambient techno,’ he laughs. ‘But it was easy enough to make techno good enough to get us signed after six months of mucking around at uni.’ 

The young techno warrior was messianic. 

‘I thought the song was dead, the chorus was dead, playing drums and guitar and bass was so old-school and outdated and why would you want to do that? Dylan did that 50 years ago! We should be part of this new revolution, instrumentalism, acid house, rave culture, techno – this stuff is a brave new avant-garde frontier and you should be involved.’ 

His ardour and his skills saw Greenall become part of the Ninja Tune family – first signed on the back of a cassette-tape demo - as artist, DJ, writer, producer, and remixer. 

‘Brilliant times,’ he sighs nostalgically. ‘Sometimes you’d just have to pinch yourself. Then, other times, you wake up in Bratislava on a Tuesday morning and you’re reminded that there is hard work to all of this.’ All that crate-digging wasn’t all it’s cracked up to be either: ‘You can’t be shit!’ Greenall grins. ‘And because of the community that Ninja has worldwide, if you are shit everybody knows about it the next day. Eight years of DJing have given me an obscenely huge record collection. I just cleared out the breaks section – four crates of twelves that were total pony!’ 

So the wheels of steel started to fall off. 

‘It wasn’t until I’d run that right the way through to its natural conclusion – I’m an international DJ on the biggest DJ label in the world – that I thought: I’m kinda over it. And it was actually working with a young artist straight out of school called Amy Winehouse that inspired me to go, “wow, songs are great! Now I get how difficult it is, and how much talent there is involved in this. It’s more of a challenge than clubbing.”’ 

Greenall melted down his turntables and recast them as a guitar and a stool. Metaphorically speaking. His parents were pleased. ‘My career only made sense to them when I picked up a guitar and started to sing,’ he says. ‘All of a sudden I was doing music, I wasn’t just mucking around. But in my rave days, DJing techno and breaks, they didn’t get that at all. That’s probably why I did it in the first place. 

‘But I realised: if your music had songs in it, it had a much greater reach. Not in business terms, but if a singer of, say, Amy’s calibre sings over this beat, it becomes so much bigger than just a beat. I can’t get rid of my clubbing past, not that I’d want to. But the linear nature of some of my music is definitely because of all those years spent clubbing and DJing, when a very simple idea can make the best club record. And it’s the same with songs – I’m after a really simple riff or really simple lyric or melody. And it’s about keeping that beautiful moment going for as long as you can.’

[links] =>

Fink Website

Facebook
Twitter
Soundcloud

[image_upload_id] => 19785 [label_id] => 13 [twitter_username] => Finkmusic [instagram_id] => [instagram_username] => [link] => [listed] => 1 [sortname] => Fink [created] => 2010-07-17 22:15:58 [modified] => 2014-08-11 14:09:15 [slug] => fink [fuga_id] => [description_clean] =>

Fin Greenall, who is the voice and heart behind Fink, often gets mistaken for other people. 

At the BMI Awards in the US, a ‘roomful of gangstas and playas’ were convinced the Cornwall-born, Bristol-raised Englishman was a lawyer, and not a songwriter picking up an ‘American Urban’ gong – one of three BMIs he received for his work with John Legend on the soul singer’s Evolver album.

In Berlin, clubbing capital of the world, they think he helps run a small minimal techno label. In certain London circles he’s known as the hardworking insider whose past roles at DefJam, Sony Music, Talkin’ Loud, and Source saw him work with a range of artists longer than the horizon. At the BBC, they imagine Fink as perhaps the only musician who has played both the Electric Proms and the actual Proms (was that really the same guy leading a 120-piece orchestra at the Royal Albert Hall in an ‘immense’ cover of Roy Ayers’ Everybody Loves The Sunshine?). 

In record company circles, he’s the producer who worked on the first demos by Amy Winehouse and the writer who’s been crafting hooks for Professor Green. In big-room booths around the world, he’s the internationally-renowned DJ and Ninja Tune stalwart who finally hung up his Sennheisers with a valedictory set at London’s Fabric in 2003. ‘My skillset just seemed so old compared to these guys that could DJ for six hours without one high-hat out of place using Ableton or something,’ he notes admiringly.

Who is Fin Greenall? All of the above. 

Yes, the now-Brighton-based musician acknowledges, he has done – does do – all of those things. ‘But none of that is as important as how I feel when I write songs like "Fear is Like Fire" and "Perfect Darkness". The Fink thing is my main thing.’

As a kid, the one thing of his dad’s that Fin Greenall wasn’t allowed to touch was the old Martin acoustic guitar. ‘It was his one possession where he said, “everything in this house is owned by everybody – apart from that.”’ But with age – and the burgeoning of his son’s skills as a player – came a relaxation of the exclusion zone: Greenall plays the Martin on the punchy, Jeff Buckley-covering-Radiohead-esque "Fear Is Like Fire". It’s sure to become a live stand-out on Fink’s upcoming, 18-month-long world tour. ‘It’s all about trying to look at fear and be optimistic – you can be really negative or fucking embrace it and use it. 

‘The great thing about growing up in a house where music is a big factor,’ he continues, ‘was the fact that music being part of your life was a perfectly natural thing.’ 

Music, it seems, became more than that: it was Greenall’s life. He hoovered up the sounds he heard on John Peel: ‘The Cure, The Smiths, The Orb, African music, Japanese hardcore’. He embraced skateboarding, the music and the fashion – ‘it was an awesome way to grow your own culture’. At university in Leeds, electronic and dance music became everything. 

‘It was definitely about wanting to be part of a revolution that I could call my own,’ he recalls. ‘A couple of friends and I clubbed together our student loans and bought equipment to make ambient techno – we were really inspired by Aphex Twin and The Orb and Moby. We were amazed at how fucking easy it was to make ambient techno. It wasn’t easy to make good ambient techno,’ he laughs. ‘But it was easy enough to make techno good enough to get us signed after six months of mucking around at uni.’ 

The young techno warrior was messianic. 

‘I thought the song was dead, the chorus was dead, playing drums and guitar and bass was so old-school and outdated and why would you want to do that? Dylan did that 50 years ago! We should be part of this new revolution, instrumentalism, acid house, rave culture, techno – this stuff is a brave new avant-garde frontier and you should be involved.’ 

His ardour and his skills saw Greenall become part of the Ninja Tune family – first signed on the back of a cassette-tape demo - as artist, DJ, writer, producer, and remixer. 

‘Brilliant times,’ he sighs nostalgically. ‘Sometimes you’d just have to pinch yourself. Then, other times, you wake up in Bratislava on a Tuesday morning and you’re reminded that there is hard work to all of this.’ All that crate-digging wasn’t all it’s cracked up to be either: ‘You can’t be shit!’ Greenall grins. ‘And because of the community that Ninja has worldwide, if you are shit everybody knows about it the next day. Eight years of DJing have given me an obscenely huge record collection. I just cleared out the breaks section – four crates of twelves that were total pony!’ 

So the wheels of steel started to fall off. 

‘It wasn’t until I’d run that right the way through to its natural conclusion – I’m an international DJ on the biggest DJ label in the world – that I thought: I’m kinda over it. And it was actually working with a young artist straight out of school called Amy Winehouse that inspired me to go, “wow, songs are great! Now I get how difficult it is, and how much talent there is involved in this. It’s more of a challenge than clubbing.”’ 

Greenall melted down his turntables and recast them as a guitar and a stool. Metaphorically speaking. His parents were pleased. ‘My career only made sense to them when I picked up a guitar and started to sing,’ he says. ‘All of a sudden I was doing music, I wasn’t just mucking around. But in my rave days, DJing techno and breaks, they didn’t get that at all. That’s probably why I did it in the first place. 

‘But I realised: if your music had songs in it, it had a much greater reach. Not in business terms, but if a singer of, say, Amy’s calibre sings over this beat, it becomes so much bigger than just a beat. I can’t get rid of my clubbing past, not that I’d want to. But the linear nature of some of my music is definitely because of all those years spent clubbing and DJing, when a very simple idea can make the best club record. And it’s the same with songs – I’m after a really simple riff or really simple lyric or melody. And it’s about keeping that beautiful moment going for as long as you can.’

[links_clean] =>

Fink Website

Facebook
Twitter
Soundcloud

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Photo: Eric Coleman

Residing in Los Angeles, California, Seven Davis Jr was raised on the classics – from Michael Jackson and Prince to Stevie Wonder and Aretha Franklin. His early self-released output, however, was more closely aligned to the city’s vibrant left-leaning electronic underground. The past 18 months have seen Seven skip from a retrospective EP via Kutmah’s IZWID imprint to 12"s with Must Have Records, Classic, Ten Thousand Yen (alongside Doc Daneeka) and Funkineven’s Apron Records on a Peven Everett vs. Sa-Ra vs. Derrick Carter flex.

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Photo: Eric Coleman

Residing in Los Angeles, California, Seven Davis Jr was raised on the classics – from Michael Jackson and Prince to Stevie Wonder and Aretha Franklin. His early self-released output, however, was more closely aligned to the city’s vibrant left-leaning electronic underground. The past 18 months have seen Seven skip from a retrospective EP via Kutmah’s IZWID imprint to 12"s with Must Have Records, Classic, Ten Thousand Yen (alongside Doc Daneeka) and Funkineven’s Apron Records on a Peven Everett vs. Sa-Ra vs. Derrick Carter flex.

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Busdriver is fixed as one of LA music’s most dynamic indie artist. From his years as a cyher phenom at Project Blowed to his years as a recording artist on Epitaph to his current role as co-head of Hellfyre Club, Busdriver has always challenged rap in the most particular and thoughful of ways.

BD’s first record, Memoirs of the Elephantman, was self released thru Afterlife records (a Project Blowed subcrew at the time)in 1999. Not until his second self-released record, Temporary Forever, came out in 2002 did Busdriver step on the world stage. Sleeper hit "Imaginary Places" turned him into one of many beacons of left-leaning hip-hop at the moment. During this time he was also emceeing at the Hiphop/Drum’n’bass night weekly Concrete Jungle with Daddy Kev, Myka 9, edit and DJ Hive.

After the new success of Temporary Forever, Busdriver signed with Mush records to do a collaborative album with beat/production guru Daedelus and quirky rap talent Radioinactive in 2003. The project was called ‘The Weather’. Their album toyed with daring disjointed production and dexterous rap writing in a way that Busdriver hadn’t in the past. The project amassed a small cult following all its own and aligned Driver’s taste with the output of LA’s electronic music scene.

In 2004, Busdriver began his relationship with Big Dada by releasing with them the Daddy Kev-produced mini-LP, Cosmic Cleavage. This was followed by Busdriver’s official 3rd album, Fear of a Black Tangent, released via Big Dada in the EU and on Mush in the US.

Busdriver’s label dealings grew outside of the rap arena in 2007 when he signed to indie-punk mega-label Epitaph and eventually, it’s more indie-music driven sister label, Anti-. Through them he released RoadKillOvercoat in 2007 and Jhellibeam in 2009. Both albums featured production from DJ Nobody, Nosaj Thing, Free the Robots and Boom Bip. During these years, rap producer culture was in flux in LA and the newly founded Low End Theory began gaining momentum. Producer eDIT (who becomes the head of Glitch Mob) featured Busdriver on "Crunk De Gaulle" (also featuring TTC) off his Alpha Pup debut, Certified Air Raid Material.

Computer Cooties came out in 2010 after BD parted with Anti-. It was a free mixtape featuring collaborations with Flying Lotus, Anti-Pop Consortium, Sister Crayon, Daedelus and Open Mike Eagle. He followed this by joining Hellfyre Club and forming Flash Bang Grenada, a two-man group made of Nocando (founder of Hellfyre Club and original resident of Low End Theory) and himself, created solely to let their musings on popular rap themes run amok. They released their debut 10 Haters in 2011.

In 2012, BD released Beaus$Eros through Fake Four. The album was produced entirely by Loden and had features from Cocorosie and Mike Ladd. It was a departure from rap writing into microclimates of experimental pop but then completely not also. The record was coupled with Regan Farquhar aka Busdriver(Driver) fronting an progressive power pop outfit briefly called Physiccal Forms.

That same year Driver released Arguments with Dreams, an EP marking a return to Big Dada. It was mostly self-produced with stand-out appearances from Das Racist on “Firehydrant” and HFC members Nocando and Mike Eagle on “Wernor Herzog”.

In 2013, Driver helmed and oversaw the production of Dorner Vs. Tookie, the joint mixtape featuring efforts from all the members of Hellfyre Club (Nocando, Busdriver, Open Mike Eagle, milo, Rheteric Ramirez, Kail, VerBS, Taurus Scott, The Kleerz). While doing this Busdriver completed his 8th proper studio album, Perfect Hair. The album features production from Mono/Poly, Jeremiah Jae, Great Dane, Kenny Segal and Riley Lake with guest performances from Danny Brown, Aesop Rock and Mike Eagle. A follow up mixtape from Hellfyre Club in collaboration with producer collective Team Supreme is planned for 2014. But it is only it is pre-production stages now.

More recently Driver has done collaborations with Modeselektor, Son Lux, Latyrx, Kool AD, Lapalux, Sonnymoon, P.O.S, and others on various albums.

[links] =>

Facebook
Twitter
SoundCloud
Dorner Vs. Tookie Mixtape

[image_upload_id] => 19576 [label_id] => 2 [twitter_username] => Busdriverr [instagram_id] => 7648195 [instagram_username] => busdriverr [link] => [listed] => 1 [sortname] => Busdriver [created] => 2010-07-17 22:15:58 [modified] => 2014-06-16 17:41:15 [slug] => busdriver [fuga_id] => [description_clean] =>

Busdriver is fixed as one of LA music’s most dynamic indie artist. From his years as a cyher phenom at Project Blowed to his years as a recording artist on Epitaph to his current role as co-head of Hellfyre Club, Busdriver has always challenged rap in the most particular and thoughful of ways.

BD’s first record, Memoirs of the Elephantman, was self released thru Afterlife records (a Project Blowed subcrew at the time)in 1999. Not until his second self-released record, Temporary Forever, came out in 2002 did Busdriver step on the world stage. Sleeper hit "Imaginary Places" turned him into one of many beacons of left-leaning hip-hop at the moment. During this time he was also emceeing at the Hiphop/Drum’n’bass night weekly Concrete Jungle with Daddy Kev, Myka 9, edit and DJ Hive.

After the new success of Temporary Forever, Busdriver signed with Mush records to do a collaborative album with beat/production guru Daedelus and quirky rap talent Radioinactive in 2003. The project was called ‘The Weather’. Their album toyed with daring disjointed production and dexterous rap writing in a way that Busdriver hadn’t in the past. The project amassed a small cult following all its own and aligned Driver’s taste with the output of LA’s electronic music scene.

In 2004, Busdriver began his relationship with Big Dada by releasing with them the Daddy Kev-produced mini-LP, Cosmic Cleavage. This was followed by Busdriver’s official 3rd album, Fear of a Black Tangent, released via Big Dada in the EU and on Mush in the US.

Busdriver’s label dealings grew outside of the rap arena in 2007 when he signed to indie-punk mega-label Epitaph and eventually, it’s more indie-music driven sister label, Anti-. Through them he released RoadKillOvercoat in 2007 and Jhellibeam in 2009. Both albums featured production from DJ Nobody, Nosaj Thing, Free the Robots and Boom Bip. During these years, rap producer culture was in flux in LA and the newly founded Low End Theory began gaining momentum. Producer eDIT (who becomes the head of Glitch Mob) featured Busdriver on "Crunk De Gaulle" (also featuring TTC) off his Alpha Pup debut, Certified Air Raid Material.

Computer Cooties came out in 2010 after BD parted with Anti-. It was a free mixtape featuring collaborations with Flying Lotus, Anti-Pop Consortium, Sister Crayon, Daedelus and Open Mike Eagle. He followed this by joining Hellfyre Club and forming Flash Bang Grenada, a two-man group made of Nocando (founder of Hellfyre Club and original resident of Low End Theory) and himself, created solely to let their musings on popular rap themes run amok. They released their debut 10 Haters in 2011.

In 2012, BD released Beaus$Eros through Fake Four. The album was produced entirely by Loden and had features from Cocorosie and Mike Ladd. It was a departure from rap writing into microclimates of experimental pop but then completely not also. The record was coupled with Regan Farquhar aka Busdriver(Driver) fronting an progressive power pop outfit briefly called Physiccal Forms.

That same year Driver released Arguments with Dreams, an EP marking a return to Big Dada. It was mostly self-produced with stand-out appearances from Das Racist on “Firehydrant” and HFC members Nocando and Mike Eagle on “Wernor Herzog”.

In 2013, Driver helmed and oversaw the production of Dorner Vs. Tookie, the joint mixtape featuring efforts from all the members of Hellfyre Club (Nocando, Busdriver, Open Mike Eagle, milo, Rheteric Ramirez, Kail, VerBS, Taurus Scott, The Kleerz). While doing this Busdriver completed his 8th proper studio album, Perfect Hair. The album features production from Mono/Poly, Jeremiah Jae, Great Dane, Kenny Segal and Riley Lake with guest performances from Danny Brown, Aesop Rock and Mike Eagle. A follow up mixtape from Hellfyre Club in collaboration with producer collective Team Supreme is planned for 2014. But it is only it is pre-production stages now.

More recently Driver has done collaborations with Modeselektor, Son Lux, Latyrx, Kool AD, Lapalux, Sonnymoon, P.O.S, and others on various albums.

[links_clean] =>

Facebook
Twitter
SoundCloud
Dorner Vs. Tookie Mixtape

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Mr. Scruff: DJ, Producer & Cartoonist

As a DJ, Andy Carthy aka Mr. Scruff plays across the board, flitting between soul, funk, hip hop, jazz, reggae, latin, african, ska, disco, house, funk, breaks, soundtracks and loads more. As a producer he makes music that draws on these influences, with a large dose of cheek and good humour. His cartoon drawings illustrate gig flyers, record sleeves and CD covers, and usually accompany him at gigs as live animated visuals.

Carthy’s first encounter with mixing was as a 12 year old in late 1984, when a friend played him some of his uncle's electro records, notably the Streetsounds LP Crucial Electro Volume 1, opening his eyes and ears to the art of mixing records. Soon after he was constructing his own crude pause-button mixtapes, inspired by the electro compilations and various radio shows on stations such as Piccadilly, Radio Lancashire & Southside that exposed him to electro and hip-hop, soul, reggae and early house music. Shouts to John Peel (of course), Greg Wilson, Robbie Vincent, Richard Searling, Stu Allan, Lee Browne, Ranking Miss P, Scotty, Tony the Greek, Steve Barker, Gary Hickson, Sam Brown & Waxmaster.

Little by little Andy was building a collection fuelled by this knowledge, all the while improving his DJ skills. By 1987 he was proficient at turntable mixing and editing, although he was still using primitive home hi-fi gear. His first break came in 1994, when he met Barney Doodlebug, a DJ/Doodler who gave him his first Manchester gig, on a Sunday night in a venue called Dry Bar. He also passed on a demo tape to local label Rob's Records, which resulted in them releasing the first Mr. Scruff 12" single.

A regular on the Manchester scene through ’94-’95, he released a string of 12”s on Rob's Records subsidiary Pleasure, as well as sides for Echo Drop, Grand Central & Cup of Tea. His work for Grand Central with Mark Rae inspired some four-deck club performances, including friendly “battles” with DJ Food, which introduced him to the Ninja Tune fold.

Gigging across the UK (with Electric Chair, Off Centre, Fat City and Tru Thoughts) and Europe (with Grand Central), Mr. Scruff signed to Ninja Tune in 1998. His debut album Keep It Unreal arrived a year later, featuring the certified classic "Get A Move On", kick-starting his Manchester club night of the same name, borne of a desire to play exactly what he wanted, rather than having to fit in with the music policies of other club nights.

These were the beginnings of his famed “all-night-long” DJ sets cheerfully spanning blues, jazz, soul, funk, 60s R&B, disco, boogie, deep house, reggae, ska, rocksteady, dancehall, electronica, electro, hip hop, African, Latin, drum & bass, breakbeat… and bolstered his standing as a passionate, digger, collector and, above all, an unrivalled selector of the good stuff.

Trouser Jazz (2002); the epic mix CD Keep It Solid Steel (2004); and Ninja Tuna (2008) cemented Scruff’s rep as a premium freaker of frequencies, the latter featuring collaborations with the likes of Quantic, Danny Breaks, Alice Russell, Andreya Triana, Pete Simpson, Kaidi Tatham and Roots Manuva.

A fistful of EPs and singles populated 2009-2013 including Wobble Control (2011), Feel It / Bounce (2011) and Be The Music (2012).

In 2010 Big Chill Festival invited Mr. Scruff to host his own tent, testament to his inimitable raw dancefloor magnetism as are his regularly rammed-to-the-rafters Keep It Unreal sessions at Band On The Wall (Manchester) and KOKO (London).

After receiving a mighty nudge by the giant elbow of Ninja, the majority of 2013 was spent in the studio recording new album Friendly Bacteria, featuring Denis Jones, Matthew Halsall, Phil France, Vanessa Freeman & Robert Owens.

[links] =>

www.mrscruff.com

Facebook
Twitter
Soundcloud

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Mr. Scruff: DJ, Producer & Cartoonist

As a DJ, Andy Carthy aka Mr. Scruff plays across the board, flitting between soul, funk, hip hop, jazz, reggae, latin, african, ska, disco, house, funk, breaks, soundtracks and loads more. As a producer he makes music that draws on these influences, with a large dose of cheek and good humour. His cartoon drawings illustrate gig flyers, record sleeves and CD covers, and usually accompany him at gigs as live animated visuals.

Carthy’s first encounter with mixing was as a 12 year old in late 1984, when a friend played him some of his uncle's electro records, notably the Streetsounds LP Crucial Electro Volume 1, opening his eyes and ears to the art of mixing records. Soon after he was constructing his own crude pause-button mixtapes, inspired by the electro compilations and various radio shows on stations such as Piccadilly, Radio Lancashire & Southside that exposed him to electro and hip-hop, soul, reggae and early house music. Shouts to John Peel (of course), Greg Wilson, Robbie Vincent, Richard Searling, Stu Allan, Lee Browne, Ranking Miss P, Scotty, Tony the Greek, Steve Barker, Gary Hickson, Sam Brown & Waxmaster.

Little by little Andy was building a collection fuelled by this knowledge, all the while improving his DJ skills. By 1987 he was proficient at turntable mixing and editing, although he was still using primitive home hi-fi gear. His first break came in 1994, when he met Barney Doodlebug, a DJ/Doodler who gave him his first Manchester gig, on a Sunday night in a venue called Dry Bar. He also passed on a demo tape to local label Rob's Records, which resulted in them releasing the first Mr. Scruff 12" single.

A regular on the Manchester scene through ’94-’95, he released a string of 12”s on Rob's Records subsidiary Pleasure, as well as sides for Echo Drop, Grand Central & Cup of Tea. His work for Grand Central with Mark Rae inspired some four-deck club performances, including friendly “battles” with DJ Food, which introduced him to the Ninja Tune fold.

Gigging across the UK (with Electric Chair, Off Centre, Fat City and Tru Thoughts) and Europe (with Grand Central), Mr. Scruff signed to Ninja Tune in 1998. His debut album Keep It Unreal arrived a year later, featuring the certified classic "Get A Move On", kick-starting his Manchester club night of the same name, borne of a desire to play exactly what he wanted, rather than having to fit in with the music policies of other club nights.

These were the beginnings of his famed “all-night-long” DJ sets cheerfully spanning blues, jazz, soul, funk, 60s R&B, disco, boogie, deep house, reggae, ska, rocksteady, dancehall, electronica, electro, hip hop, African, Latin, drum & bass, breakbeat… and bolstered his standing as a passionate, digger, collector and, above all, an unrivalled selector of the good stuff.

Trouser Jazz (2002); the epic mix CD Keep It Solid Steel (2004); and Ninja Tuna (2008) cemented Scruff’s rep as a premium freaker of frequencies, the latter featuring collaborations with the likes of Quantic, Danny Breaks, Alice Russell, Andreya Triana, Pete Simpson, Kaidi Tatham and Roots Manuva.

A fistful of EPs and singles populated 2009-2013 including Wobble Control (2011), Feel It / Bounce (2011) and Be The Music (2012).

In 2010 Big Chill Festival invited Mr. Scruff to host his own tent, testament to his inimitable raw dancefloor magnetism as are his regularly rammed-to-the-rafters Keep It Unreal sessions at Band On The Wall (Manchester) and KOKO (London).

After receiving a mighty nudge by the giant elbow of Ninja, the majority of 2013 was spent in the studio recording new album Friendly Bacteria, featuring Denis Jones, Matthew Halsall, Phil France, Vanessa Freeman & Robert Owens.

[links_clean] =>

www.mrscruff.com

Facebook
Twitter
Soundcloud

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The young electronic musician known as Romare wears his inspiration on his sleeve – in fact, he takes his very name from it. Having studied African American Visual Culture at University, he had his ‘Sex Pistols moment’ when he came across the work of Romare Bearden. The African American’s collaged, cut’n’paste artworks inspired the young musician to apply a similar technique to music – an approach that was hugely fruitful, and remains central to his work today. After stints as a drummer and guitarist throughout school and university, he moved to Paris where he picked up the turntables and began mixing his own music with samples from second hand records. Romare the musician was born and the template for his debut record.

Underground hothouse Black Acre signed him in 2012, adding him to a formidable roster that included Loops Haunt, Fantastic Mr Fox, Blue Daisy and Dark Sky. The imprint put out his first release Meditations on Afrocentrism in March of that year. He began to play shows, making enough money to finance a move to London. Ensconced in the vast musical melting pot of the capital, he began work on his second EP Love Songs: Part One. Romare’s songs were included on compilations by heavyweights such as Bonobo and Tiga, as well as the Brownswood Recordings imprint.

His debut album, Projections, is named after a pivotal exhibition of his namesake and likewise explores various elements of American life. The album is in many ways a homage to the cycle of cultural appropriation in America. “Work Song” is a tribute to the classic American and namesake work song, whilst “Rainbow” is a celebration of disco. Projections expertly catalogues the movements of influence within music. The album doesn’t just sample music and vocal snatches, but also other sources such as documentaries and marries live instrumentation with the sampling palette.

With fierce support from by the likes of Benji B, Gilles Peterson and Huw Stephens, Romare’s music has, rightfully, already caused a stir. The stage is now set for his stunning debut album, Projections.

[links] =>

Website
Facebook
Twitter
SoundCloud
YouTube

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The young electronic musician known as Romare wears his inspiration on his sleeve – in fact, he takes his very name from it. Having studied African American Visual Culture at University, he had his ‘Sex Pistols moment’ when he came across the work of Romare Bearden. The African American’s collaged, cut’n’paste artworks inspired the young musician to apply a similar technique to music – an approach that was hugely fruitful, and remains central to his work today. After stints as a drummer and guitarist throughout school and university, he moved to Paris where he picked up the turntables and began mixing his own music with samples from second hand records. Romare the musician was born and the template for his debut record.

Underground hothouse Black Acre signed him in 2012, adding him to a formidable roster that included Loops Haunt, Fantastic Mr Fox, Blue Daisy and Dark Sky. The imprint put out his first release Meditations on Afrocentrism in March of that year. He began to play shows, making enough money to finance a move to London. Ensconced in the vast musical melting pot of the capital, he began work on his second EP Love Songs: Part One. Romare’s songs were included on compilations by heavyweights such as Bonobo and Tiga, as well as the Brownswood Recordings imprint.

His debut album, Projections, is named after a pivotal exhibition of his namesake and likewise explores various elements of American life. The album is in many ways a homage to the cycle of cultural appropriation in America. “Work Song” is a tribute to the classic American and namesake work song, whilst “Rainbow” is a celebration of disco. Projections expertly catalogues the movements of influence within music. The album doesn’t just sample music and vocal snatches, but also other sources such as documentaries and marries live instrumentation with the sampling palette.

With fierce support from by the likes of Benji B, Gilles Peterson and Huw Stephens, Romare’s music has, rightfully, already caused a stir. The stage is now set for his stunning debut album, Projections.

[links_clean] =>

Website
Facebook
Twitter
SoundCloud
YouTube

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Kate Tempest started out when she was 16, rapping at strangers on night busses and pestering mc's to let her on the mic at raves. Ten years later she is a published playwright, novelist, poet and respected recording artist. Her work includes Balance, her first album with band Sound of Rum; Everything Speaks in its Own Way her first collection of poems, the critically acclaimed playsWasted, Glasshouse and Hopelessly Devoted.  Brand New Ancients, her self-performed epic poem to a live score, won the Ted Hughes prize 2013 and the Herald Angel at Edinburgh Fringe.It has sold out tours in the UK and New York and is published by Picador. Her second collection of poetry, Hold Your Own, will be published by Picador on October 2014. Her debut novel, The Bricks That Built The Houses, sold in a highly competitive auction to Bloomsbury and will be published in territories including the UK, US, France, Holland and Brazil in Spring 2015. Excitingly, each track on the record correlates with a chapter in the novel, in a groundbreaking cross-genre experience. 

Her single Our Town, with producers letthemusicplay was recently released on Greco-Roman records. Kate has featured on songs with Sinead O Connor, Bastille, the King Blues, Damien Dempsey and Landslide. She has toured extensively, supporting Billy Bragg on his UK tour, as well as supporting Scroobius Pip, Femi Kuti, Saul Williams and John Cooper Clarke. She is 2 x slam winner at the prestigious Nu-Yorican poetry cafe in New York and has played all the major UK and European music festivals either solo or with Sound of Rum. She's headlined Latitude festival and has been featured on the BBC's Glastonbury highlights, Channel 4, BBC Radio 1,4 and 6, as well as XFM and the Charlie Rose Show (Bloomberg) in the US.

Kate's new album Everybody Down is released in May 2014 on Big Dada records.  It was produced by Dan Carey aka Mr Dan who is one of the UK’s best known and most highly-rated producers. When the two met, Carey invited Tempest to come through to his South London studio to muck about on a track or two. In a burst of intense creativity, they put down the whole twelve track album in a fortnight having spent almost a year developing the characters and story. Kate is currently working on a new collection of poems, (to be published by Picador in 2014). 

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Kate Tempest started out when she was 16, rapping at strangers on night busses and pestering mc's to let her on the mic at raves. Ten years later she is a published playwright, novelist, poet and respected recording artist. Her work includes Balance, her first album with band Sound of Rum; Everything Speaks in its Own Way her first collection of poems, the critically acclaimed playsWasted, Glasshouse and Hopelessly Devoted.  Brand New Ancients, her self-performed epic poem to a live score, won the Ted Hughes prize 2013 and the Herald Angel at Edinburgh Fringe.It has sold out tours in the UK and New York and is published by Picador. Her second collection of poetry, Hold Your Own, will be published by Picador on October 2014. Her debut novel, The Bricks That Built The Houses, sold in a highly competitive auction to Bloomsbury and will be published in territories including the UK, US, France, Holland and Brazil in Spring 2015. Excitingly, each track on the record correlates with a chapter in the novel, in a groundbreaking cross-genre experience. 

Her single Our Town, with producers letthemusicplay was recently released on Greco-Roman records. Kate has featured on songs with Sinead O Connor, Bastille, the King Blues, Damien Dempsey and Landslide. She has toured extensively, supporting Billy Bragg on his UK tour, as well as supporting Scroobius Pip, Femi Kuti, Saul Williams and John Cooper Clarke. She is 2 x slam winner at the prestigious Nu-Yorican poetry cafe in New York and has played all the major UK and European music festivals either solo or with Sound of Rum. She's headlined Latitude festival and has been featured on the BBC's Glastonbury highlights, Channel 4, BBC Radio 1,4 and 6, as well as XFM and the Charlie Rose Show (Bloomberg) in the US.

Kate's new album Everybody Down is released in May 2014 on Big Dada records.  It was produced by Dan Carey aka Mr Dan who is one of the UK’s best known and most highly-rated producers. When the two met, Carey invited Tempest to come through to his South London studio to muck about on a track or two. In a burst of intense creativity, they put down the whole twelve track album in a fortnight having spent almost a year developing the characters and story. Kate is currently working on a new collection of poems, (to be published by Picador in 2014). 

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Busdriver is fixed as one of LA music’s most dynamic indie artist. From his years as a cyher phenom at Project Blowed to his years as a recording artist on Epitaph to his current role as co-head of Hellfyre Club, Busdriver has always challenged rap in the most particular and thoughful of ways.

BD’s first record, Memoirs of the Elephantman, was self released thru Afterlife records (a Project Blowed subcrew at the time)in 1999. Not until his second self-released record, Temporary Forever, came out in 2002 did Busdriver step on the world stage. Sleeper hit "Imaginary Places" turned him into one of many beacons of left-leaning hip-hop at the moment. During this time he was also emceeing at the Hiphop/Drum’n’bass night weekly Concrete Jungle with Daddy Kev, Myka 9, edit and DJ Hive.

After the new success of Temporary Forever, Busdriver signed with Mush records to do a collaborative album with beat/production guru Daedelus and quirky rap talent Radioinactive in 2003. The project was called ‘The Weather’. Their album toyed with daring disjointed production and dexterous rap writing in a way that Busdriver hadn’t in the past. The project amassed a small cult following all its own and aligned Driver’s taste with the output of LA’s electronic music scene.

In 2004, Busdriver began his relationship with Big Dada by releasing with them the Daddy Kev-produced mini-LP, Cosmic Cleavage. This was followed by Busdriver’s official 3rd album, Fear of a Black Tangent, released via Big Dada in the EU and on Mush in the US.

Busdriver’s label dealings grew outside of the rap arena in 2007 when he signed to indie-punk mega-label Epitaph and eventually, it’s more indie-music driven sister label, Anti-. Through them he released RoadKillOvercoat in 2007 and Jhellibeam in 2009. Both albums featured production from DJ Nobody, Nosaj Thing, Free the Robots and Boom Bip. During these years, rap producer culture was in flux in LA and the newly founded Low End Theory began gaining momentum. Producer eDIT (who becomes the head of Glitch Mob) featured Busdriver on "Crunk De Gaulle" (also featuring TTC) off his Alpha Pup debut, Certified Air Raid Material.

Computer Cooties came out in 2010 after BD parted with Anti-. It was a free mixtape featuring collaborations with Flying Lotus, Anti-Pop Consortium, Sister Crayon, Daedelus and Open Mike Eagle. He followed this by joining Hellfyre Club and forming Flash Bang Grenada, a two-man group made of Nocando (founder of Hellfyre Club and original resident of Low End Theory) and himself, created solely to let their musings on popular rap themes run amok. They released their debut 10 Haters in 2011.

In 2012, BD released Beaus$Eros through Fake Four. The album was produced entirely by Loden and had features from Cocorosie and Mike Ladd. It was a departure from rap writing into microclimates of experimental pop but then completely not also. The record was coupled with Regan Farquhar aka Busdriver(Driver) fronting an progressive power pop outfit briefly called Physiccal Forms.

That same year Driver released Arguments with Dreams, an EP marking a return to Big Dada. It was mostly self-produced with stand-out appearances from Das Racist on “Firehydrant” and HFC members Nocando and Mike Eagle on “Wernor Herzog”.

In 2013, Driver helmed and oversaw the production of Dorner Vs. Tookie, the joint mixtape featuring efforts from all the members of Hellfyre Club (Nocando, Busdriver, Open Mike Eagle, milo, Rheteric Ramirez, Kail, VerBS, Taurus Scott, The Kleerz). While doing this Busdriver completed his 8th proper studio album, Perfect Hair. The album features production from Mono/Poly, Jeremiah Jae, Great Dane, Kenny Segal and Riley Lake with guest performances from Danny Brown, Aesop Rock and Mike Eagle. A follow up mixtape from Hellfyre Club in collaboration with producer collective Team Supreme is planned for 2014. But it is only it is pre-production stages now.

More recently Driver has done collaborations with Modeselektor, Son Lux, Latyrx, Kool AD, Lapalux, Sonnymoon, P.O.S, and others on various albums.

[links] =>

Facebook
Twitter
SoundCloud
Dorner Vs. Tookie Mixtape

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Busdriver is fixed as one of LA music’s most dynamic indie artist. From his years as a cyher phenom at Project Blowed to his years as a recording artist on Epitaph to his current role as co-head of Hellfyre Club, Busdriver has always challenged rap in the most particular and thoughful of ways.

BD’s first record, Memoirs of the Elephantman, was self released thru Afterlife records (a Project Blowed subcrew at the time)in 1999. Not until his second self-released record, Temporary Forever, came out in 2002 did Busdriver step on the world stage. Sleeper hit "Imaginary Places" turned him into one of many beacons of left-leaning hip-hop at the moment. During this time he was also emceeing at the Hiphop/Drum’n’bass night weekly Concrete Jungle with Daddy Kev, Myka 9, edit and DJ Hive.

After the new success of Temporary Forever, Busdriver signed with Mush records to do a collaborative album with beat/production guru Daedelus and quirky rap talent Radioinactive in 2003. The project was called ‘The Weather’. Their album toyed with daring disjointed production and dexterous rap writing in a way that Busdriver hadn’t in the past. The project amassed a small cult following all its own and aligned Driver’s taste with the output of LA’s electronic music scene.

In 2004, Busdriver began his relationship with Big Dada by releasing with them the Daddy Kev-produced mini-LP, Cosmic Cleavage. This was followed by Busdriver’s official 3rd album, Fear of a Black Tangent, released via Big Dada in the EU and on Mush in the US.

Busdriver’s label dealings grew outside of the rap arena in 2007 when he signed to indie-punk mega-label Epitaph and eventually, it’s more indie-music driven sister label, Anti-. Through them he released RoadKillOvercoat in 2007 and Jhellibeam in 2009. Both albums featured production from DJ Nobody, Nosaj Thing, Free the Robots and Boom Bip. During these years, rap producer culture was in flux in LA and the newly founded Low End Theory began gaining momentum. Producer eDIT (who becomes the head of Glitch Mob) featured Busdriver on "Crunk De Gaulle" (also featuring TTC) off his Alpha Pup debut, Certified Air Raid Material.

Computer Cooties came out in 2010 after BD parted with Anti-. It was a free mixtape featuring collaborations with Flying Lotus, Anti-Pop Consortium, Sister Crayon, Daedelus and Open Mike Eagle. He followed this by joining Hellfyre Club and forming Flash Bang Grenada, a two-man group made of Nocando (founder of Hellfyre Club and original resident of Low End Theory) and himself, created solely to let their musings on popular rap themes run amok. They released their debut 10 Haters in 2011.

In 2012, BD released Beaus$Eros through Fake Four. The album was produced entirely by Loden and had features from Cocorosie and Mike Ladd. It was a departure from rap writing into microclimates of experimental pop but then completely not also. The record was coupled with Regan Farquhar aka Busdriver(Driver) fronting an progressive power pop outfit briefly called Physiccal Forms.

That same year Driver released Arguments with Dreams, an EP marking a return to Big Dada. It was mostly self-produced with stand-out appearances from Das Racist on “Firehydrant” and HFC members Nocando and Mike Eagle on “Wernor Herzog”.

In 2013, Driver helmed and oversaw the production of Dorner Vs. Tookie, the joint mixtape featuring efforts from all the members of Hellfyre Club (Nocando, Busdriver, Open Mike Eagle, milo, Rheteric Ramirez, Kail, VerBS, Taurus Scott, The Kleerz). While doing this Busdriver completed his 8th proper studio album, Perfect Hair. The album features production from Mono/Poly, Jeremiah Jae, Great Dane, Kenny Segal and Riley Lake with guest performances from Danny Brown, Aesop Rock and Mike Eagle. A follow up mixtape from Hellfyre Club in collaboration with producer collective Team Supreme is planned for 2014. But it is only it is pre-production stages now.

More recently Driver has done collaborations with Modeselektor, Son Lux, Latyrx, Kool AD, Lapalux, Sonnymoon, P.O.S, and others on various albums.

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Dorner Vs. Tookie Mixtape

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Kate Tempest started out when she was 16, rapping at strangers on night busses and pestering mc's to let her on the mic at raves. Ten years later she is a published playwright, novelist, poet and respected recording artist. Her work includes Balance, her first album with band Sound of Rum; Everything Speaks in its Own Way her first collection of poems, the critically acclaimed playsWasted, Glasshouse and Hopelessly Devoted.  Brand New Ancients, her self-performed epic poem to a live score, won the Ted Hughes prize 2013 and the Herald Angel at Edinburgh Fringe.It has sold out tours in the UK and New York and is published by Picador. Her second collection of poetry, Hold Your Own, will be published by Picador on October 2014. Her debut novel, The Bricks That Built The Houses, sold in a highly competitive auction to Bloomsbury and will be published in territories including the UK, US, France, Holland and Brazil in Spring 2015. Excitingly, each track on the record correlates with a chapter in the novel, in a groundbreaking cross-genre experience. 

Her single Our Town, with producers letthemusicplay was recently released on Greco-Roman records. Kate has featured on songs with Sinead O Connor, Bastille, the King Blues, Damien Dempsey and Landslide. She has toured extensively, supporting Billy Bragg on his UK tour, as well as supporting Scroobius Pip, Femi Kuti, Saul Williams and John Cooper Clarke. She is 2 x slam winner at the prestigious Nu-Yorican poetry cafe in New York and has played all the major UK and European music festivals either solo or with Sound of Rum. She's headlined Latitude festival and has been featured on the BBC's Glastonbury highlights, Channel 4, BBC Radio 1,4 and 6, as well as XFM and the Charlie Rose Show (Bloomberg) in the US.

Kate's new album Everybody Down is released in May 2014 on Big Dada records.  It was produced by Dan Carey aka Mr Dan who is one of the UK’s best known and most highly-rated producers. When the two met, Carey invited Tempest to come through to his South London studio to muck about on a track or two. In a burst of intense creativity, they put down the whole twelve track album in a fortnight having spent almost a year developing the characters and story. Kate is currently working on a new collection of poems, (to be published by Picador in 2014). 

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Kate Tempest started out when she was 16, rapping at strangers on night busses and pestering mc's to let her on the mic at raves. Ten years later she is a published playwright, novelist, poet and respected recording artist. Her work includes Balance, her first album with band Sound of Rum; Everything Speaks in its Own Way her first collection of poems, the critically acclaimed playsWasted, Glasshouse and Hopelessly Devoted.  Brand New Ancients, her self-performed epic poem to a live score, won the Ted Hughes prize 2013 and the Herald Angel at Edinburgh Fringe.It has sold out tours in the UK and New York and is published by Picador. Her second collection of poetry, Hold Your Own, will be published by Picador on October 2014. Her debut novel, The Bricks That Built The Houses, sold in a highly competitive auction to Bloomsbury and will be published in territories including the UK, US, France, Holland and Brazil in Spring 2015. Excitingly, each track on the record correlates with a chapter in the novel, in a groundbreaking cross-genre experience. 

Her single Our Town, with producers letthemusicplay was recently released on Greco-Roman records. Kate has featured on songs with Sinead O Connor, Bastille, the King Blues, Damien Dempsey and Landslide. She has toured extensively, supporting Billy Bragg on his UK tour, as well as supporting Scroobius Pip, Femi Kuti, Saul Williams and John Cooper Clarke. She is 2 x slam winner at the prestigious Nu-Yorican poetry cafe in New York and has played all the major UK and European music festivals either solo or with Sound of Rum. She's headlined Latitude festival and has been featured on the BBC's Glastonbury highlights, Channel 4, BBC Radio 1,4 and 6, as well as XFM and the Charlie Rose Show (Bloomberg) in the US.

Kate's new album Everybody Down is released in May 2014 on Big Dada records.  It was produced by Dan Carey aka Mr Dan who is one of the UK’s best known and most highly-rated producers. When the two met, Carey invited Tempest to come through to his South London studio to muck about on a track or two. In a burst of intense creativity, they put down the whole twelve track album in a fortnight having spent almost a year developing the characters and story. Kate is currently working on a new collection of poems, (to be published by Picador in 2014). 

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Fin Greenall, who is the voice and heart behind Fink, often gets mistaken for other people. 

At the BMI Awards in the US, a ‘roomful of gangstas and playas’ were convinced the Cornwall-born, Bristol-raised Englishman was a lawyer, and not a songwriter picking up an ‘American Urban’ gong – one of three BMIs he received for his work with John Legend on the soul singer’s Evolver album.

In Berlin, clubbing capital of the world, they think he helps run a small minimal techno label. In certain London circles he’s known as the hardworking insider whose past roles at DefJam, Sony Music, Talkin’ Loud, and Source saw him work with a range of artists longer than the horizon. At the BBC, they imagine Fink as perhaps the only musician who has played both the Electric Proms and the actual Proms (was that really the same guy leading a 120-piece orchestra at the Royal Albert Hall in an ‘immense’ cover of Roy Ayers’ Everybody Loves The Sunshine?). 

In record company circles, he’s the producer who worked on the first demos by Amy Winehouse and the writer who’s been crafting hooks for Professor Green. In big-room booths around the world, he’s the internationally-renowned DJ and Ninja Tune stalwart who finally hung up his Sennheisers with a valedictory set at London’s Fabric in 2003. ‘My skillset just seemed so old compared to these guys that could DJ for six hours without one high-hat out of place using Ableton or something,’ he notes admiringly.

Who is Fin Greenall? All of the above. 

Yes, the now-Brighton-based musician acknowledges, he has done – does do – all of those things. ‘But none of that is as important as how I feel when I write songs like "Fear is Like Fire" and "Perfect Darkness". The Fink thing is my main thing.’

As a kid, the one thing of his dad’s that Fin Greenall wasn’t allowed to touch was the old Martin acoustic guitar. ‘It was his one possession where he said, “everything in this house is owned by everybody – apart from that.”’ But with age – and the burgeoning of his son’s skills as a player – came a relaxation of the exclusion zone: Greenall plays the Martin on the punchy, Jeff Buckley-covering-Radiohead-esque "Fear Is Like Fire". It’s sure to become a live stand-out on Fink’s upcoming, 18-month-long world tour. ‘It’s all about trying to look at fear and be optimistic – you can be really negative or fucking embrace it and use it. 

‘The great thing about growing up in a house where music is a big factor,’ he continues, ‘was the fact that music being part of your life was a perfectly natural thing.’ 

Music, it seems, became more than that: it was Greenall’s life. He hoovered up the sounds he heard on John Peel: ‘The Cure, The Smiths, The Orb, African music, Japanese hardcore’. He embraced skateboarding, the music and the fashion – ‘it was an awesome way to grow your own culture’. At university in Leeds, electronic and dance music became everything. 

‘It was definitely about wanting to be part of a revolution that I could call my own,’ he recalls. ‘A couple of friends and I clubbed together our student loans and bought equipment to make ambient techno – we were really inspired by Aphex Twin and The Orb and Moby. We were amazed at how fucking easy it was to make ambient techno. It wasn’t easy to make good ambient techno,’ he laughs. ‘But it was easy enough to make techno good enough to get us signed after six months of mucking around at uni.’ 

The young techno warrior was messianic. 

‘I thought the song was dead, the chorus was dead, playing drums and guitar and bass was so old-school and outdated and why would you want to do that? Dylan did that 50 years ago! We should be part of this new revolution, instrumentalism, acid house, rave culture, techno – this stuff is a brave new avant-garde frontier and you should be involved.’ 

His ardour and his skills saw Greenall become part of the Ninja Tune family – first signed on the back of a cassette-tape demo - as artist, DJ, writer, producer, and remixer. 

‘Brilliant times,’ he sighs nostalgically. ‘Sometimes you’d just have to pinch yourself. Then, other times, you wake up in Bratislava on a Tuesday morning and you’re reminded that there is hard work to all of this.’ All that crate-digging wasn’t all it’s cracked up to be either: ‘You can’t be shit!’ Greenall grins. ‘And because of the community that Ninja has worldwide, if you are shit everybody knows about it the next day. Eight years of DJing have given me an obscenely huge record collection. I just cleared out the breaks section – four crates of twelves that were total pony!’ 

So the wheels of steel started to fall off. 

‘It wasn’t until I’d run that right the way through to its natural conclusion – I’m an international DJ on the biggest DJ label in the world – that I thought: I’m kinda over it. And it was actually working with a young artist straight out of school called Amy Winehouse that inspired me to go, “wow, songs are great! Now I get how difficult it is, and how much talent there is involved in this. It’s more of a challenge than clubbing.”’ 

Greenall melted down his turntables and recast them as a guitar and a stool. Metaphorically speaking. His parents were pleased. ‘My career only made sense to them when I picked up a guitar and started to sing,’ he says. ‘All of a sudden I was doing music, I wasn’t just mucking around. But in my rave days, DJing techno and breaks, they didn’t get that at all. That’s probably why I did it in the first place. 

‘But I realised: if your music had songs in it, it had a much greater reach. Not in business terms, but if a singer of, say, Amy’s calibre sings over this beat, it becomes so much bigger than just a beat. I can’t get rid of my clubbing past, not that I’d want to. But the linear nature of some of my music is definitely because of all those years spent clubbing and DJing, when a very simple idea can make the best club record. And it’s the same with songs – I’m after a really simple riff or really simple lyric or melody. And it’s about keeping that beautiful moment going for as long as you can.’

[links] =>

Fink Website

Facebook
Twitter
Soundcloud

[image_upload_id] => 19785 [label_id] => 13 [twitter_username] => Finkmusic [instagram_id] => [instagram_username] => [link] => [listed] => 1 [sortname] => Fink [created] => 2010-07-17 22:15:58 [modified] => 2014-08-11 14:09:15 [slug] => fink [fuga_id] => [description_clean] =>

Fin Greenall, who is the voice and heart behind Fink, often gets mistaken for other people. 

At the BMI Awards in the US, a ‘roomful of gangstas and playas’ were convinced the Cornwall-born, Bristol-raised Englishman was a lawyer, and not a songwriter picking up an ‘American Urban’ gong – one of three BMIs he received for his work with John Legend on the soul singer’s Evolver album.

In Berlin, clubbing capital of the world, they think he helps run a small minimal techno label. In certain London circles he’s known as the hardworking insider whose past roles at DefJam, Sony Music, Talkin’ Loud, and Source saw him work with a range of artists longer than the horizon. At the BBC, they imagine Fink as perhaps the only musician who has played both the Electric Proms and the actual Proms (was that really the same guy leading a 120-piece orchestra at the Royal Albert Hall in an ‘immense’ cover of Roy Ayers’ Everybody Loves The Sunshine?). 

In record company circles, he’s the producer who worked on the first demos by Amy Winehouse and the writer who’s been crafting hooks for Professor Green. In big-room booths around the world, he’s the internationally-renowned DJ and Ninja Tune stalwart who finally hung up his Sennheisers with a valedictory set at London’s Fabric in 2003. ‘My skillset just seemed so old compared to these guys that could DJ for six hours without one high-hat out of place using Ableton or something,’ he notes admiringly.

Who is Fin Greenall? All of the above. 

Yes, the now-Brighton-based musician acknowledges, he has done – does do – all of those things. ‘But none of that is as important as how I feel when I write songs like "Fear is Like Fire" and "Perfect Darkness". The Fink thing is my main thing.’

As a kid, the one thing of his dad’s that Fin Greenall wasn’t allowed to touch was the old Martin acoustic guitar. ‘It was his one possession where he said, “everything in this house is owned by everybody – apart from that.”’ But with age – and the burgeoning of his son’s skills as a player – came a relaxation of the exclusion zone: Greenall plays the Martin on the punchy, Jeff Buckley-covering-Radiohead-esque "Fear Is Like Fire". It’s sure to become a live stand-out on Fink’s upcoming, 18-month-long world tour. ‘It’s all about trying to look at fear and be optimistic – you can be really negative or fucking embrace it and use it. 

‘The great thing about growing up in a house where music is a big factor,’ he continues, ‘was the fact that music being part of your life was a perfectly natural thing.’ 

Music, it seems, became more than that: it was Greenall’s life. He hoovered up the sounds he heard on John Peel: ‘The Cure, The Smiths, The Orb, African music, Japanese hardcore’. He embraced skateboarding, the music and the fashion – ‘it was an awesome way to grow your own culture’. At university in Leeds, electronic and dance music became everything. 

‘It was definitely about wanting to be part of a revolution that I could call my own,’ he recalls. ‘A couple of friends and I clubbed together our student loans and bought equipment to make ambient techno – we were really inspired by Aphex Twin and The Orb and Moby. We were amazed at how fucking easy it was to make ambient techno. It wasn’t easy to make good ambient techno,’ he laughs. ‘But it was easy enough to make techno good enough to get us signed after six months of mucking around at uni.’ 

The young techno warrior was messianic. 

‘I thought the song was dead, the chorus was dead, playing drums and guitar and bass was so old-school and outdated and why would you want to do that? Dylan did that 50 years ago! We should be part of this new revolution, instrumentalism, acid house, rave culture, techno – this stuff is a brave new avant-garde frontier and you should be involved.’ 

His ardour and his skills saw Greenall become part of the Ninja Tune family – first signed on the back of a cassette-tape demo - as artist, DJ, writer, producer, and remixer. 

‘Brilliant times,’ he sighs nostalgically. ‘Sometimes you’d just have to pinch yourself. Then, other times, you wake up in Bratislava on a Tuesday morning and you’re reminded that there is hard work to all of this.’ All that crate-digging wasn’t all it’s cracked up to be either: ‘You can’t be shit!’ Greenall grins. ‘And because of the community that Ninja has worldwide, if you are shit everybody knows about it the next day. Eight years of DJing have given me an obscenely huge record collection. I just cleared out the breaks section – four crates of twelves that were total pony!’ 

So the wheels of steel started to fall off. 

‘It wasn’t until I’d run that right the way through to its natural conclusion – I’m an international DJ on the biggest DJ label in the world – that I thought: I’m kinda over it. And it was actually working with a young artist straight out of school called Amy Winehouse that inspired me to go, “wow, songs are great! Now I get how difficult it is, and how much talent there is involved in this. It’s more of a challenge than clubbing.”’ 

Greenall melted down his turntables and recast them as a guitar and a stool. Metaphorically speaking. His parents were pleased. ‘My career only made sense to them when I picked up a guitar and started to sing,’ he says. ‘All of a sudden I was doing music, I wasn’t just mucking around. But in my rave days, DJing techno and breaks, they didn’t get that at all. That’s probably why I did it in the first place. 

‘But I realised: if your music had songs in it, it had a much greater reach. Not in business terms, but if a singer of, say, Amy’s calibre sings over this beat, it becomes so much bigger than just a beat. I can’t get rid of my clubbing past, not that I’d want to. But the linear nature of some of my music is definitely because of all those years spent clubbing and DJing, when a very simple idea can make the best club record. And it’s the same with songs – I’m after a really simple riff or really simple lyric or melody. And it’s about keeping that beautiful moment going for as long as you can.’

[links_clean] =>

Fink Website

Facebook
Twitter
Soundcloud

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Kate Tempest started out when she was 16, rapping at strangers on night busses and pestering mc's to let her on the mic at raves. Ten years later she is a published playwright, novelist, poet and respected recording artist. Her work includes Balance, her first album with band Sound of Rum; Everything Speaks in its Own Way her first collection of poems, the critically acclaimed playsWasted, Glasshouse and Hopelessly Devoted.  Brand New Ancients, her self-performed epic poem to a live score, won the Ted Hughes prize 2013 and the Herald Angel at Edinburgh Fringe.It has sold out tours in the UK and New York and is published by Picador. Her second collection of poetry, Hold Your Own, will be published by Picador on October 2014. Her debut novel, The Bricks That Built The Houses, sold in a highly competitive auction to Bloomsbury and will be published in territories including the UK, US, France, Holland and Brazil in Spring 2015. Excitingly, each track on the record correlates with a chapter in the novel, in a groundbreaking cross-genre experience. 

Her single Our Town, with producers letthemusicplay was recently released on Greco-Roman records. Kate has featured on songs with Sinead O Connor, Bastille, the King Blues, Damien Dempsey and Landslide. She has toured extensively, supporting Billy Bragg on his UK tour, as well as supporting Scroobius Pip, Femi Kuti, Saul Williams and John Cooper Clarke. She is 2 x slam winner at the prestigious Nu-Yorican poetry cafe in New York and has played all the major UK and European music festivals either solo or with Sound of Rum. She's headlined Latitude festival and has been featured on the BBC's Glastonbury highlights, Channel 4, BBC Radio 1,4 and 6, as well as XFM and the Charlie Rose Show (Bloomberg) in the US.

Kate's new album Everybody Down is released in May 2014 on Big Dada records.  It was produced by Dan Carey aka Mr Dan who is one of the UK’s best known and most highly-rated producers. When the two met, Carey invited Tempest to come through to his South London studio to muck about on a track or two. In a burst of intense creativity, they put down the whole twelve track album in a fortnight having spent almost a year developing the characters and story. Kate is currently working on a new collection of poems, (to be published by Picador in 2014). 

[links] => Website [image_upload_id] => 19166 [label_id] => 2 [twitter_username] => katetempest [instagram_id] => [instagram_username] => [link] => [listed] => 1 [sortname] => Kate Tempest [created] => 2014-02-12 10:55:31 [modified] => 2014-04-07 13:37:03 [slug] => kate-tempest [fuga_id] => [description_clean] =>

Kate Tempest started out when she was 16, rapping at strangers on night busses and pestering mc's to let her on the mic at raves. Ten years later she is a published playwright, novelist, poet and respected recording artist. Her work includes Balance, her first album with band Sound of Rum; Everything Speaks in its Own Way her first collection of poems, the critically acclaimed playsWasted, Glasshouse and Hopelessly Devoted.  Brand New Ancients, her self-performed epic poem to a live score, won the Ted Hughes prize 2013 and the Herald Angel at Edinburgh Fringe.It has sold out tours in the UK and New York and is published by Picador. Her second collection of poetry, Hold Your Own, will be published by Picador on October 2014. Her debut novel, The Bricks That Built The Houses, sold in a highly competitive auction to Bloomsbury and will be published in territories including the UK, US, France, Holland and Brazil in Spring 2015. Excitingly, each track on the record correlates with a chapter in the novel, in a groundbreaking cross-genre experience. 

Her single Our Town, with producers letthemusicplay was recently released on Greco-Roman records. Kate has featured on songs with Sinead O Connor, Bastille, the King Blues, Damien Dempsey and Landslide. She has toured extensively, supporting Billy Bragg on his UK tour, as well as supporting Scroobius Pip, Femi Kuti, Saul Williams and John Cooper Clarke. She is 2 x slam winner at the prestigious Nu-Yorican poetry cafe in New York and has played all the major UK and European music festivals either solo or with Sound of Rum. She's headlined Latitude festival and has been featured on the BBC's Glastonbury highlights, Channel 4, BBC Radio 1,4 and 6, as well as XFM and the Charlie Rose Show (Bloomberg) in the US.

Kate's new album Everybody Down is released in May 2014 on Big Dada records.  It was produced by Dan Carey aka Mr Dan who is one of the UK’s best known and most highly-rated producers. When the two met, Carey invited Tempest to come through to his South London studio to muck about on a track or two. In a burst of intense creativity, they put down the whole twelve track album in a fortnight having spent almost a year developing the characters and story. Kate is currently working on a new collection of poems, (to be published by Picador in 2014). 

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Fin Greenall, who is the voice and heart behind Fink, often gets mistaken for other people. 

At the BMI Awards in the US, a ‘roomful of gangstas and playas’ were convinced the Cornwall-born, Bristol-raised Englishman was a lawyer, and not a songwriter picking up an ‘American Urban’ gong – one of three BMIs he received for his work with John Legend on the soul singer’s Evolver album.

In Berlin, clubbing capital of the world, they think he helps run a small minimal techno label. In certain London circles he’s known as the hardworking insider whose past roles at DefJam, Sony Music, Talkin’ Loud, and Source saw him work with a range of artists longer than the horizon. At the BBC, they imagine Fink as perhaps the only musician who has played both the Electric Proms and the actual Proms (was that really the same guy leading a 120-piece orchestra at the Royal Albert Hall in an ‘immense’ cover of Roy Ayers’ Everybody Loves The Sunshine?). 

In record company circles, he’s the producer who worked on the first demos by Amy Winehouse and the writer who’s been crafting hooks for Professor Green. In big-room booths around the world, he’s the internationally-renowned DJ and Ninja Tune stalwart who finally hung up his Sennheisers with a valedictory set at London’s Fabric in 2003. ‘My skillset just seemed so old compared to these guys that could DJ for six hours without one high-hat out of place using Ableton or something,’ he notes admiringly.

Who is Fin Greenall? All of the above. 

Yes, the now-Brighton-based musician acknowledges, he has done – does do – all of those things. ‘But none of that is as important as how I feel when I write songs like "Fear is Like Fire" and "Perfect Darkness". The Fink thing is my main thing.’

As a kid, the one thing of his dad’s that Fin Greenall wasn’t allowed to touch was the old Martin acoustic guitar. ‘It was his one possession where he said, “everything in this house is owned by everybody – apart from that.”’ But with age – and the burgeoning of his son’s skills as a player – came a relaxation of the exclusion zone: Greenall plays the Martin on the punchy, Jeff Buckley-covering-Radiohead-esque "Fear Is Like Fire". It’s sure to become a live stand-out on Fink’s upcoming, 18-month-long world tour. ‘It’s all about trying to look at fear and be optimistic – you can be really negative or fucking embrace it and use it. 

‘The great thing about growing up in a house where music is a big factor,’ he continues, ‘was the fact that music being part of your life was a perfectly natural thing.’ 

Music, it seems, became more than that: it was Greenall’s life. He hoovered up the sounds he heard on John Peel: ‘The Cure, The Smiths, The Orb, African music, Japanese hardcore’. He embraced skateboarding, the music and the fashion – ‘it was an awesome way to grow your own culture’. At university in Leeds, electronic and dance music became everything. 

‘It was definitely about wanting to be part of a revolution that I could call my own,’ he recalls. ‘A couple of friends and I clubbed together our student loans and bought equipment to make ambient techno – we were really inspired by Aphex Twin and The Orb and Moby. We were amazed at how fucking easy it was to make ambient techno. It wasn’t easy to make good ambient techno,’ he laughs. ‘But it was easy enough to make techno good enough to get us signed after six months of mucking around at uni.’ 

The young techno warrior was messianic. 

‘I thought the song was dead, the chorus was dead, playing drums and guitar and bass was so old-school and outdated and why would you want to do that? Dylan did that 50 years ago! We should be part of this new revolution, instrumentalism, acid house, rave culture, techno – this stuff is a brave new avant-garde frontier and you should be involved.’ 

His ardour and his skills saw Greenall become part of the Ninja Tune family – first signed on the back of a cassette-tape demo - as artist, DJ, writer, producer, and remixer. 

‘Brilliant times,’ he sighs nostalgically. ‘Sometimes you’d just have to pinch yourself. Then, other times, you wake up in Bratislava on a Tuesday morning and you’re reminded that there is hard work to all of this.’ All that crate-digging wasn’t all it’s cracked up to be either: ‘You can’t be shit!’ Greenall grins. ‘And because of the community that Ninja has worldwide, if you are shit everybody knows about it the next day. Eight years of DJing have given me an obscenely huge record collection. I just cleared out the breaks section – four crates of twelves that were total pony!’ 

So the wheels of steel started to fall off. 

‘It wasn’t until I’d run that right the way through to its natural conclusion – I’m an international DJ on the biggest DJ label in the world – that I thought: I’m kinda over it. And it was actually working with a young artist straight out of school called Amy Winehouse that inspired me to go, “wow, songs are great! Now I get how difficult it is, and how much talent there is involved in this. It’s more of a challenge than clubbing.”’ 

Greenall melted down his turntables and recast them as a guitar and a stool. Metaphorically speaking. His parents were pleased. ‘My career only made sense to them when I picked up a guitar and started to sing,’ he says. ‘All of a sudden I was doing music, I wasn’t just mucking around. But in my rave days, DJing techno and breaks, they didn’t get that at all. That’s probably why I did it in the first place. 

‘But I realised: if your music had songs in it, it had a much greater reach. Not in business terms, but if a singer of, say, Amy’s calibre sings over this beat, it becomes so much bigger than just a beat. I can’t get rid of my clubbing past, not that I’d want to. But the linear nature of some of my music is definitely because of all those years spent clubbing and DJing, when a very simple idea can make the best club record. And it’s the same with songs – I’m after a really simple riff or really simple lyric or melody. And it’s about keeping that beautiful moment going for as long as you can.’

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[image_upload_id] => 19785 [label_id] => 13 [twitter_username] => Finkmusic [instagram_id] => [instagram_username] => [link] => [listed] => 1 [sortname] => Fink [created] => 2010-07-17 22:15:58 [modified] => 2014-08-11 14:09:15 [slug] => fink [fuga_id] => [description_clean] =>

Fin Greenall, who is the voice and heart behind Fink, often gets mistaken for other people. 

At the BMI Awards in the US, a ‘roomful of gangstas and playas’ were convinced the Cornwall-born, Bristol-raised Englishman was a lawyer, and not a songwriter picking up an ‘American Urban’ gong – one of three BMIs he received for his work with John Legend on the soul singer’s Evolver album.

In Berlin, clubbing capital of the world, they think he helps run a small minimal techno label. In certain London circles he’s known as the hardworking insider whose past roles at DefJam, Sony Music, Talkin’ Loud, and Source saw him work with a range of artists longer than the horizon. At the BBC, they imagine Fink as perhaps the only musician who has played both the Electric Proms and the actual Proms (was that really the same guy leading a 120-piece orchestra at the Royal Albert Hall in an ‘immense’ cover of Roy Ayers’ Everybody Loves The Sunshine?). 

In record company circles, he’s the producer who worked on the first demos by Amy Winehouse and the writer who’s been crafting hooks for Professor Green. In big-room booths around the world, he’s the internationally-renowned DJ and Ninja Tune stalwart who finally hung up his Sennheisers with a valedictory set at London’s Fabric in 2003. ‘My skillset just seemed so old compared to these guys that could DJ for six hours without one high-hat out of place using Ableton or something,’ he notes admiringly.

Who is Fin Greenall? All of the above. 

Yes, the now-Brighton-based musician acknowledges, he has done – does do – all of those things. ‘But none of that is as important as how I feel when I write songs like "Fear is Like Fire" and "Perfect Darkness". The Fink thing is my main thing.’

As a kid, the one thing of his dad’s that Fin Greenall wasn’t allowed to touch was the old Martin acoustic guitar. ‘It was his one possession where he said, “everything in this house is owned by everybody – apart from that.”’ But with age – and the burgeoning of his son’s skills as a player – came a relaxation of the exclusion zone: Greenall plays the Martin on the punchy, Jeff Buckley-covering-Radiohead-esque "Fear Is Like Fire". It’s sure to become a live stand-out on Fink’s upcoming, 18-month-long world tour. ‘It’s all about trying to look at fear and be optimistic – you can be really negative or fucking embrace it and use it. 

‘The great thing about growing up in a house where music is a big factor,’ he continues, ‘was the fact that music being part of your life was a perfectly natural thing.’ 

Music, it seems, became more than that: it was Greenall’s life. He hoovered up the sounds he heard on John Peel: ‘The Cure, The Smiths, The Orb, African music, Japanese hardcore’. He embraced skateboarding, the music and the fashion – ‘it was an awesome way to grow your own culture’. At university in Leeds, electronic and dance music became everything. 

‘It was definitely about wanting to be part of a revolution that I could call my own,’ he recalls. ‘A couple of friends and I clubbed together our student loans and bought equipment to make ambient techno – we were really inspired by Aphex Twin and The Orb and Moby. We were amazed at how fucking easy it was to make ambient techno. It wasn’t easy to make good ambient techno,’ he laughs. ‘But it was easy enough to make techno good enough to get us signed after six months of mucking around at uni.’ 

The young techno warrior was messianic. 

‘I thought the song was dead, the chorus was dead, playing drums and guitar and bass was so old-school and outdated and why would you want to do that? Dylan did that 50 years ago! We should be part of this new revolution, instrumentalism, acid house, rave culture, techno – this stuff is a brave new avant-garde frontier and you should be involved.’ 

His ardour and his skills saw Greenall become part of the Ninja Tune family – first signed on the back of a cassette-tape demo - as artist, DJ, writer, producer, and remixer. 

‘Brilliant times,’ he sighs nostalgically. ‘Sometimes you’d just have to pinch yourself. Then, other times, you wake up in Bratislava on a Tuesday morning and you’re reminded that there is hard work to all of this.’ All that crate-digging wasn’t all it’s cracked up to be either: ‘You can’t be shit!’ Greenall grins. ‘And because of the community that Ninja has worldwide, if you are shit everybody knows about it the next day. Eight years of DJing have given me an obscenely huge record collection. I just cleared out the breaks section – four crates of twelves that were total pony!’ 

So the wheels of steel started to fall off. 

‘It wasn’t until I’d run that right the way through to its natural conclusion – I’m an international DJ on the biggest DJ label in the world – that I thought: I’m kinda over it. And it was actually working with a young artist straight out of school called Amy Winehouse that inspired me to go, “wow, songs are great! Now I get how difficult it is, and how much talent there is involved in this. It’s more of a challenge than clubbing.”’ 

Greenall melted down his turntables and recast them as a guitar and a stool. Metaphorically speaking. His parents were pleased. ‘My career only made sense to them when I picked up a guitar and started to sing,’ he says. ‘All of a sudden I was doing music, I wasn’t just mucking around. But in my rave days, DJing techno and breaks, they didn’t get that at all. That’s probably why I did it in the first place. 

‘But I realised: if your music had songs in it, it had a much greater reach. Not in business terms, but if a singer of, say, Amy’s calibre sings over this beat, it becomes so much bigger than just a beat. I can’t get rid of my clubbing past, not that I’d want to. But the linear nature of some of my music is definitely because of all those years spent clubbing and DJing, when a very simple idea can make the best club record. And it’s the same with songs – I’m after a really simple riff or really simple lyric or melody. And it’s about keeping that beautiful moment going for as long as you can.’

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Artist Date City Venue Buy
Fink Sunday, Feb 1st Istanbul, TU Babylon Club Buy
Fink Monday, Feb 2nd Sofia, BG Sofia Live Club Buy
Busdriver Tuesday, Feb 3rd Roubaix, FR La Cave Aux Poetes Buy
Fink Wednesday, Feb 4th Bucharest, RO Silver Church Buy
Busdriver Wednesday, Feb 4th Dijon, FR La Vapeur Buy
Fink Thursday, Feb 5th Belgrade, SB Dom Omladine Buy
Busdriver Thursday, Feb 5th Metz, FR Freeeeze Festival Buy
Fink Friday, Feb 6th Zagreb, HR Mocvara Buy
Seven Davis Jr Friday, Feb 6th Liverpool, GB Abandon Silence Buy
Busdriver Friday, Feb 6th Orleans, FR L'Astrolab Buy
Mr. Scruff Friday, Feb 6th Melbourne, AU 170 Russell Buy
Romare Saturday, Feb 7th Monpellier, FR L’antirouille Buy
Kate Tempest Saturday, Feb 7th Portsmouth, GB Wedgewood Rooms Buy
Busdriver Saturday, Feb 7th Evreux, FR L'Abordage Buy
Kate Tempest Sunday, Feb 8th Bristol, GB Motion Buy
Fink Monday, Feb 9th Budapest, HU A38 Buy
Kate Tempest Tuesday, Feb 10th Brighton, GB Concorde 2 Buy
Fink Tuesday, Feb 10th Bratislava, SK Majestic Music Club Buy

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