Array ( [Event] => Array ( [id] => 13037 [date] => 2014-07-24 [artist] => Kelis [city] => Melbourne [state] => [country] => AU [venue] => The Prince Bandroom [promoter] => [description] => [ticket_url] => http://tickets.oztix.com.au/?Event=43692&utm_source=songkick [image_upload_id] => 19296 [created] => 2014-06-05 17:44:16 [modified] => 2014-06-05 17:44:16 [year_slug] => 2014 [month_slug] => jul [day_slug] => 24 [slug] => kelis-melbourne-the-prince-bandroom [description_clean] => [products_count] => 0 [hidden] => 0 ) [Image] => Array ( [id] => 19296 [media_type] => image [artist] => Kelis [title] => Kelis Artist Shot 2014 [credits] => [buy_link] => [filename] => images/kelis/TRU1157610-OliviaMalone.jpg [checksum] => 1f91e83bcbbdef637395883f88449493 [mime_type] => image/jpeg [size] => 8769221 [external_url] => http://media.ninjatune.net/images/kelis/TRU1157610-OliviaMalone.jpg [image_upload_id] => [first_track_id] => [first_release_id] => [listed] => 0 [active] => 0 [processed] => 1 [artist_slug] => kelis [slug] => kelis-artist-shot-2014 [created] => 2014-04-09 17:06:02 [modified] => 2014-04-09 17:07:52 [embed] => ) [Country] => Array ( [id] => 238 [name] => Australia [longname] => Australia [numcode] => 36 [iso] => AU [iso3] => AUS [currency] => AUD [active] => 1 [parent_id] => 237 [lft] => 473 [rght] => 474 [level] => 2 ) [Product] => Array ( ) [Artist] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => 200 [name] => Kelis [description] =>

Kelis describes her sixth album as “a kind of unspoken lovefest”, albeit one involving two unlikely partners. On the one hand, there is Kelis Rogers, who first came to prominence singing the hook of Ol’ Dirty Bastard’s 1999 hit "Got Your Money"; whose debut album Kaleidoscope helped usher in the wave of sharp, thrillingly futuristic r’n’b that dominated the charts in the early Noughties: as exemplified by her global hit, 2003’s "Milkshake"; whose last album was a pop-dance extravaganza featuring production from will.i.am and David Guetta. On the other, there was Dave Sitek, guitarist in acclaimed Brooklyn experimentalists TV On The Radio; producer by appointment to a certain kind of smart, arty indie band: the Yeah Yeah Yeahs, Foals, Liars. “It’s like we’re such different people,” says Kelis, “but I met him and he’s really just this brilliant, strange creature. I musically fell in love with him and I think he’s just a divine person. It’s ridiculous how much we speak the same language, musically and food-wise.”

Ah, food. As you may have gathered from the title, and indeed the tracks "Jerk Ribs", "Friday Fish Fry", "Biscuits n’ Gravy" and "Cobbler", food has quite a large role to play in Kelis’ sixth album, and indeed her life. She is a qualified chef, who took a cordon bleu course in 2008, after a traumatic battle with her then-record label came to an end: “I’d been trying to get off the label for four years. It was all-out war. I was in combat mode. I’d fought them for years, then one Friday I got this call telling me they were finally releasing me from my contract. I was sitting in my kitchen, watching TV, an ad came on for culinary school and I was like, “yeah, I’m going” I started class Monday morning. A year and a half course, seven hours a day, five days a week and Saturdays and Sundays you’ve got to get on the line, ready to be hired in a restaurant.”

Despite her reservations about having to wear “a stupid hat and chef’s getup”, she loved it. She’s about to launch her own range of sauces in the US called Feast – “at school I realized sauce is my thing, I personally think everything is better either smothered or poured” – and there’s talk of a TV cookery series, for which she’s just filmed a pilot episode: “a lifestyle show, it’s my life, and there really is no separation for me between the food and the music.”

You can tell as much from her hugely, infectiously enthusiastic descriptions of the session at which Food was recorded. “First of all, it was recorded at Dave’s house, which is like two minutes from my house in L.A.: ideal because we’re both borderline hermits, so that worked out really nice,” she laughs. “So I’d get there, and he’d be like, “oh, are you hungry?” And I’m like “yes, what do you have?” and I’d go and look in his kitchen. He used to start playing stuff, sitting at the piano, in the living room, right next to the kitchen, and I’d start singing a melody to it, while I’m chopping something. So then I’m frying something or whatever, and he’s playing another melody and I’m like “I love that”, so he says he’s going to call Todd. Todd’s this ridiculously good trumpet player who comes over and does this stupid freakin’ beautiful horn arrangement...

And the next thing you know, I’m cooking pies and there’s all these random musicians arriving, and it’s very calm and chilled, food’s being put on the table in the living room, another guy’s got an idea for a melody and I’m like, “I love that, it makes me think of this” and by the end of the night, we’ve got 11, 12 musicians there and everybody’s stuffed and the music is blaring, the songs are playing, it’s like a freaking zoo in there because he’s got three dogs and two Bengal cats, but it’s also like a freakin’ commune, because he’s got these girls staying there who are in this band CSS, so they’re from Brazil and now they’re cooking, they’re mixing micheladas…” Her voice trails off, happily. “It’s was great. No ego. They guys from TV On The Radio are there, and they’re working with me, and everyone is like: “I know who I am, I know who you are, I’ll do what I do and you’ll do what you do and we’ll do something that knocks everybody out in here.” And in the midst of that, we’ll eat.” She chuckles. “Literally every day, that’s what it was.”

Between mouthfuls, they devised an album entirely unlike anything Kelis has released before: a quick spin of the Simon And Garfunkel-esque ballad "Bless The Telephone" will underline that. It mints a sound that’s rootsy without ever being self-consciously retro, that pitches live horns and gospel-y organ against electronics, that for all its classic soul and funk influences, couldn’t have been made any time but now. “The one thing we did say at the beginning of this record is that whatever we do, we’re not copy cats” says Kelis. “The music I listen to and love, I can’t duplicate it, I would never try. I don’t want to make a copy of an old-school record. It doesn’t make any sense. It almost comes off as disrespectful to think that I could actually recreate what was already created masterfully.

That was never my goal. But what I will say is that thinking about moments of my life growing up, I think about what my parents listened to, what was just playing around the block, in my neighbourhood – half of it I don’t remember, but I remember the essence of it, the smile that it provides.Dave’s wonderful at grabbing a moment as opposed to trying to recreate something that doesn’t need to be recreated. That’s what we wanted to do. It’s not about, “let me duplicate this record”. It’s like, hell, we did something because it was authentic and it was beautiful and it’s rich and it’s flawed and I love it.”

In a way, it shouldn’t come as a surprise that Kelis’ music has taken another unpredictable shift: she hasn’t exactly shied away from pushing at the boundaries of the public’s perception of her from the start (“do I think that record labels in the past have had trouble knowing what to do with me and being unable to pigeonhole me?” she ponders, “um, in short: yes”). Her then-record label thought her second album, Wanderland, was too experimental and eclectic to release in America, while she’s probably the only artist in history to take a David Guetta pop-rave track and turn it into a paen to the joys of new motherhood: "Acappella", a song about the birth of her son Knight in 2009. This time, the results aren’t just unexpected, but highly personal.

Food is about more than just Kelis’ culinary passion, it’s an album about life, relationships and the uncertainty of that – “sure I’m self-sufficient, blah blah, independent,” she sings on "Floyd", “truthfully I’ve got some space I want that man to fill it” - and ridding yourself of anger and bitterness as expressed on Change. I think it’s just about where I’m at right now, and what’s going on around me and wanting to make a record that… that I believe. That I can sit down on a stool and sing for a long time.”

Understandably, she thinks she’s succeeded. “Being as arrogant as I can be, no one on Food is new to this, no one there gives a crap, everybody is literally like, “I do this because I’m good at it, I love it and it’s a blessing, and if I can do this with you, then bring it, let’s do it.” It’s like, OK, we’ve all had big budgets, we’ve all done big studios, that’s nice and whatever, but I’m also like, “I’m great, I don’t need any of that, I’ll go on my own schedule.” It would be a waste of energy throwing money at it, because everyone is there is so well-seasoned. There’s not a second of insecurity, not a second of doubt. The reality is that we’re too talented, too old and too good for any of that.” She hoots with laughter. “Like I said,” she smiles, “that’s putting it as arrogantly as I can.”

[links] =>

Website
Facebook
Twitter
Instagram
SoundCloud
YouTube

[image_upload_id] => 18971 [label_id] => 1 [twitter_username] => iamkelis [instagram_id] => 364983301 [instagram_username] => sausageandboots [link] => [listed] => 1 [sortname] => Kelis [created] => 2013-12-11 10:50:59 [modified] => 2014-04-11 14:51:15 [slug] => kelis [fuga_id] => [description_clean] =>

Kelis describes her sixth album as “a kind of unspoken lovefest”, albeit one involving two unlikely partners. On the one hand, there is Kelis Rogers, who first came to prominence singing the hook of Ol’ Dirty Bastard’s 1999 hit "Got Your Money"; whose debut album Kaleidoscope helped usher in the wave of sharp, thrillingly futuristic r’n’b that dominated the charts in the early Noughties: as exemplified by her global hit, 2003’s "Milkshake"; whose last album was a pop-dance extravaganza featuring production from will.i.am and David Guetta. On the other, there was Dave Sitek, guitarist in acclaimed Brooklyn experimentalists TV On The Radio; producer by appointment to a certain kind of smart, arty indie band: the Yeah Yeah Yeahs, Foals, Liars. “It’s like we’re such different people,” says Kelis, “but I met him and he’s really just this brilliant, strange creature. I musically fell in love with him and I think he’s just a divine person. It’s ridiculous how much we speak the same language, musically and food-wise.”

Ah, food. As you may have gathered from the title, and indeed the tracks "Jerk Ribs", "Friday Fish Fry", "Biscuits n’ Gravy" and "Cobbler", food has quite a large role to play in Kelis’ sixth album, and indeed her life. She is a qualified chef, who took a cordon bleu course in 2008, after a traumatic battle with her then-record label came to an end: “I’d been trying to get off the label for four years. It was all-out war. I was in combat mode. I’d fought them for years, then one Friday I got this call telling me they were finally releasing me from my contract. I was sitting in my kitchen, watching TV, an ad came on for culinary school and I was like, “yeah, I’m going” I started class Monday morning. A year and a half course, seven hours a day, five days a week and Saturdays and Sundays you’ve got to get on the line, ready to be hired in a restaurant.”

Despite her reservations about having to wear “a stupid hat and chef’s getup”, she loved it. She’s about to launch her own range of sauces in the US called Feast – “at school I realized sauce is my thing, I personally think everything is better either smothered or poured” – and there’s talk of a TV cookery series, for which she’s just filmed a pilot episode: “a lifestyle show, it’s my life, and there really is no separation for me between the food and the music.”

You can tell as much from her hugely, infectiously enthusiastic descriptions of the session at which Food was recorded. “First of all, it was recorded at Dave’s house, which is like two minutes from my house in L.A.: ideal because we’re both borderline hermits, so that worked out really nice,” she laughs. “So I’d get there, and he’d be like, “oh, are you hungry?” And I’m like “yes, what do you have?” and I’d go and look in his kitchen. He used to start playing stuff, sitting at the piano, in the living room, right next to the kitchen, and I’d start singing a melody to it, while I’m chopping something. So then I’m frying something or whatever, and he’s playing another melody and I’m like “I love that”, so he says he’s going to call Todd. Todd’s this ridiculously good trumpet player who comes over and does this stupid freakin’ beautiful horn arrangement...

And the next thing you know, I’m cooking pies and there’s all these random musicians arriving, and it’s very calm and chilled, food’s being put on the table in the living room, another guy’s got an idea for a melody and I’m like, “I love that, it makes me think of this” and by the end of the night, we’ve got 11, 12 musicians there and everybody’s stuffed and the music is blaring, the songs are playing, it’s like a freaking zoo in there because he’s got three dogs and two Bengal cats, but it’s also like a freakin’ commune, because he’s got these girls staying there who are in this band CSS, so they’re from Brazil and now they’re cooking, they’re mixing micheladas…” Her voice trails off, happily. “It’s was great. No ego. They guys from TV On The Radio are there, and they’re working with me, and everyone is like: “I know who I am, I know who you are, I’ll do what I do and you’ll do what you do and we’ll do something that knocks everybody out in here.” And in the midst of that, we’ll eat.” She chuckles. “Literally every day, that’s what it was.”

Between mouthfuls, they devised an album entirely unlike anything Kelis has released before: a quick spin of the Simon And Garfunkel-esque ballad "Bless The Telephone" will underline that. It mints a sound that’s rootsy without ever being self-consciously retro, that pitches live horns and gospel-y organ against electronics, that for all its classic soul and funk influences, couldn’t have been made any time but now. “The one thing we did say at the beginning of this record is that whatever we do, we’re not copy cats” says Kelis. “The music I listen to and love, I can’t duplicate it, I would never try. I don’t want to make a copy of an old-school record. It doesn’t make any sense. It almost comes off as disrespectful to think that I could actually recreate what was already created masterfully.

That was never my goal. But what I will say is that thinking about moments of my life growing up, I think about what my parents listened to, what was just playing around the block, in my neighbourhood – half of it I don’t remember, but I remember the essence of it, the smile that it provides.Dave’s wonderful at grabbing a moment as opposed to trying to recreate something that doesn’t need to be recreated. That’s what we wanted to do. It’s not about, “let me duplicate this record”. It’s like, hell, we did something because it was authentic and it was beautiful and it’s rich and it’s flawed and I love it.”

In a way, it shouldn’t come as a surprise that Kelis’ music has taken another unpredictable shift: she hasn’t exactly shied away from pushing at the boundaries of the public’s perception of her from the start (“do I think that record labels in the past have had trouble knowing what to do with me and being unable to pigeonhole me?” she ponders, “um, in short: yes”). Her then-record label thought her second album, Wanderland, was too experimental and eclectic to release in America, while she’s probably the only artist in history to take a David Guetta pop-rave track and turn it into a paen to the joys of new motherhood: "Acappella", a song about the birth of her son Knight in 2009. This time, the results aren’t just unexpected, but highly personal.

Food is about more than just Kelis’ culinary passion, it’s an album about life, relationships and the uncertainty of that – “sure I’m self-sufficient, blah blah, independent,” she sings on "Floyd", “truthfully I’ve got some space I want that man to fill it” - and ridding yourself of anger and bitterness as expressed on Change. I think it’s just about where I’m at right now, and what’s going on around me and wanting to make a record that… that I believe. That I can sit down on a stool and sing for a long time.”

Understandably, she thinks she’s succeeded. “Being as arrogant as I can be, no one on Food is new to this, no one there gives a crap, everybody is literally like, “I do this because I’m good at it, I love it and it’s a blessing, and if I can do this with you, then bring it, let’s do it.” It’s like, OK, we’ve all had big budgets, we’ve all done big studios, that’s nice and whatever, but I’m also like, “I’m great, I don’t need any of that, I’ll go on my own schedule.” It would be a waste of energy throwing money at it, because everyone is there is so well-seasoned. There’s not a second of insecurity, not a second of doubt. The reality is that we’re too talented, too old and too good for any of that.” She hoots with laughter. “Like I said,” she smiles, “that’s putting it as arrogantly as I can.”

[links_clean] =>

Website
Facebook
Twitter
Instagram
SoundCloud
YouTube

) ) ) [1] => Array ( [Event] => Array ( [id] => 13126 [date] => 2014-07-24 [artist] => The Gaslamp Killer [city] => Utrecht [state] => [country] => NL [venue] => Tivoli [promoter] => [description] => [ticket_url] => [image_upload_id] => 19645 [created] => 2014-07-03 11:11:43 [modified] => 2014-07-03 11:11:43 [year_slug] => 2014 [month_slug] => jul [day_slug] => 24 [slug] => the-gaslamp-killer-utrecht-tivoli [description_clean] => [products_count] => 0 [hidden] => 0 ) [Image] => Array ( [id] => 19645 [media_type] => image [artist] => The Gaslamp Killer [title] => European Tour 2014 [credits] => [buy_link] => [filename] => images/the-gaslamp-killer/GaslampEU2014tour430.jpg [checksum] => c57cfeeff2d2c2d7e91120c862d26d9e [mime_type] => image/jpeg [size] => 71479 [external_url] => http://media.ninjatune.net/images/the-gaslamp-killer/GaslampEU2014tour430.jpg [image_upload_id] => [first_track_id] => [first_release_id] => [listed] => 0 [active] => 1 [processed] => 1 [artist_slug] => the-gaslamp-killer [slug] => european-tour-2014-2 [created] => 2014-07-03 10:55:40 [modified] => 2014-07-03 10:57:45 [embed] => ) [Country] => Array ( [id] => 234 [name] => Netherlands [longname] => Netherlands [numcode] => 528 [iso] => NL [iso3] => NLD [currency] => EUR [active] => 1 [parent_id] => 226 [lft] => 465 [rght] => 466 [level] => 2 ) [Product] => Array ( ) [Artist] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => 131 [name] => The Gaslamp Killer [description] =>

LA’s William Bensussen, aka The Gaslamp Killer, is many things at once. The San Diego native is a bonafide one-off; an artist and human being that can never be repeated. With an unparalleled energy, the DJ, producer, promoter and curator brings a different level of performance and showmanship to electronic music. 

"I always felt drawn to party time ever since I was little. Any kind of opportunity; a wedding, bar mitzvah, holiday. Whatever kind of event that was going on in my little community in San Diego, if there was music, I was dancing. It's just the way it was. I've always been into the energy and the happiness that it brings.”

Being a true music lover, and a complete obsessive, as a DJ/selector Bensussen has opened minds around the world to music that wouldn’t otherwise get heard. In his own words: “As artists, it's our job to entertain as well as educate.” Alongside co-founder Daddy Kev, GLK has put Southern California on the music map for years to come, with their beat mecca Low End Theory and the vibrant creative community they’ve built around it. The weekly Wednesday club night has brought together different scenes and generations, breaking new artists while also getting the likes of Thom Yorke and Erykah Badu to play DJ sets to the fevered Low End crowd, who often wait hours to get in. 

Over the last ten years, Gaslamp Killer’s iconoclastic attitude has led him beyond LA to far-reaching corners of the globe, one stage at a time: from Pitch in Amsterdam, to Sonar in Barcelona, to Austin Psych Fest, to Roskilde in Denmark, to Coachella. Holding a collection of well over 13,000 vinyl records, GLK’s untamed, unpredictable sets take traditional genres of rock into the outer reaches of hip-hop and the deep into the cosmic pressure of the heaviest electronic beats, with plenty of obscurity and bizarreness in-between. 

The now rare, GLK collectables I Spit On Your Grave and All Killer inspired a new generation of DJs to appreciate the art of a mixtape. Dusted Magazine described his follow-up mix, Hell And The Lake Of Fire Are Waiting For You, with words that describe GLK as a DJ in general: “Trying to figure out what’s going on is half the draw.” 

"The music that I grew up with influences me today enormously still. I love classic rock, I still love Dub and I still love Rap. Real rap. Gansta rap. I love bands, live bands, it's the music I grew up with. I don't think there are that many bands that can compare to Jimi Hendrix, Led Zeppelin, Pink Floyd, The Doors. They're not popular for no reason. I play The Beatles in my sets all the time still. Their music is a huge influence on me. I still play Dr Dre in my set all the time. His beats and the rhymes, the energy, they just affect me so much. They are a part of me. As well as Hip Hop, as well as Rock, and Blues, and Soul, and Jazz, and Reggae, and Dub. That kind of music I think lends to everything that we are all into today. All of us are fueled by that. The formulas that they laid and the foundations that they laid are used by musicians forever and will continue to be used forever.”

As a producer, The Gaslamp Killer has worked with artists such as Gonjasufi, Prefuse 73 and Flying Lotus. His own experimental solo material pushes the borders of genre as much as his performances, particularly with his heavy-weighted EP My Troubled Mind (Brainfeeder) and the monster Death Gate EP (Brainfeeder), which featured Gonjasufi, Computer Jay and Mophono

Breakthrough will mark the debut full-length album from the Gaslamp Killer. Blending California-inspired psych with widespread global influences, on Breakthrough GLK brings together a potent cast of friends to contribute to the album, with guest appearances from Gonjasufi, Adrian Younge, Dimlite, Daedelus, SAMIYAM and more. A musical anachronism and unconstrained compilation from a wandering spirit.

[links] =>

Website

Facebook
Twitter
Soundcloud

[image_upload_id] => 15025 [label_id] => 7 [twitter_username] => GASLAMPKILLER [instagram_id] => 8233383 [instagram_username] => gaslampkiller [link] => [listed] => 0 [sortname] => Gaslamp Killer [created] => 2010-11-05 15:56:36 [modified] => 2013-05-03 14:57:46 [slug] => the-gaslamp-killer [fuga_id] => [description_clean] =>

LA’s William Bensussen, aka The Gaslamp Killer, is many things at once. The San Diego native is a bonafide one-off; an artist and human being that can never be repeated. With an unparalleled energy, the DJ, producer, promoter and curator brings a different level of performance and showmanship to electronic music. 

"I always felt drawn to party time ever since I was little. Any kind of opportunity; a wedding, bar mitzvah, holiday. Whatever kind of event that was going on in my little community in San Diego, if there was music, I was dancing. It's just the way it was. I've always been into the energy and the happiness that it brings.”

Being a true music lover, and a complete obsessive, as a DJ/selector Bensussen has opened minds around the world to music that wouldn’t otherwise get heard. In his own words: “As artists, it's our job to entertain as well as educate.” Alongside co-founder Daddy Kev, GLK has put Southern California on the music map for years to come, with their beat mecca Low End Theory and the vibrant creative community they’ve built around it. The weekly Wednesday club night has brought together different scenes and generations, breaking new artists while also getting the likes of Thom Yorke and Erykah Badu to play DJ sets to the fevered Low End crowd, who often wait hours to get in. 

Over the last ten years, Gaslamp Killer’s iconoclastic attitude has led him beyond LA to far-reaching corners of the globe, one stage at a time: from Pitch in Amsterdam, to Sonar in Barcelona, to Austin Psych Fest, to Roskilde in Denmark, to Coachella. Holding a collection of well over 13,000 vinyl records, GLK’s untamed, unpredictable sets take traditional genres of rock into the outer reaches of hip-hop and the deep into the cosmic pressure of the heaviest electronic beats, with plenty of obscurity and bizarreness in-between. 

The now rare, GLK collectables I Spit On Your Grave and All Killer inspired a new generation of DJs to appreciate the art of a mixtape. Dusted Magazine described his follow-up mix, Hell And The Lake Of Fire Are Waiting For You, with words that describe GLK as a DJ in general: “Trying to figure out what’s going on is half the draw.” 

"The music that I grew up with influences me today enormously still. I love classic rock, I still love Dub and I still love Rap. Real rap. Gansta rap. I love bands, live bands, it's the music I grew up with. I don't think there are that many bands that can compare to Jimi Hendrix, Led Zeppelin, Pink Floyd, The Doors. They're not popular for no reason. I play The Beatles in my sets all the time still. Their music is a huge influence on me. I still play Dr Dre in my set all the time. His beats and the rhymes, the energy, they just affect me so much. They are a part of me. As well as Hip Hop, as well as Rock, and Blues, and Soul, and Jazz, and Reggae, and Dub. That kind of music I think lends to everything that we are all into today. All of us are fueled by that. The formulas that they laid and the foundations that they laid are used by musicians forever and will continue to be used forever.”

As a producer, The Gaslamp Killer has worked with artists such as Gonjasufi, Prefuse 73 and Flying Lotus. His own experimental solo material pushes the borders of genre as much as his performances, particularly with his heavy-weighted EP My Troubled Mind (Brainfeeder) and the monster Death Gate EP (Brainfeeder), which featured Gonjasufi, Computer Jay and Mophono

Breakthrough will mark the debut full-length album from the Gaslamp Killer. Blending California-inspired psych with widespread global influences, on Breakthrough GLK brings together a potent cast of friends to contribute to the album, with guest appearances from Gonjasufi, Adrian Younge, Dimlite, Daedelus, SAMIYAM and more. A musical anachronism and unconstrained compilation from a wandering spirit.

[links_clean] =>

Website

Facebook
Twitter
Soundcloud

) ) ) [2] => Array ( [Event] => Array ( [id] => 13151 [date] => 2014-07-24 [artist] => Teebs [city] => San Francisco [state] => [country] => US [venue] => Mezzanine [promoter] => [description] =>

Tour support for Jon Hopkins.

[ticket_url] => http://mezzaninesf.com/ [image_upload_id] => 19669 [created] => 2014-07-10 11:46:44 [modified] => 2014-07-10 11:49:30 [year_slug] => 2014 [month_slug] => jul [day_slug] => 24 [slug] => teebs-san-francisco-mezzanine [description_clean] =>

Tour support for Jon Hopkins.

[products_count] => 0 [hidden] => 0 ) [Image] => Array ( [id] => 19669 [media_type] => image [artist] => Teebs [title] => Jon Hopkins Support [credits] => [buy_link] => [filename] => images/teebs/10525764-888326627850208-7816317361310213859-n.jpg [checksum] => 164eddad95c2775cc9e531d5422c4027 [mime_type] => image/jpeg [size] => 36724 [external_url] => http://media.ninjatune.net/images/teebs/10525764-888326627850208-7816317361310213859-n.jpg [image_upload_id] => [first_track_id] => [first_release_id] => [listed] => 0 [active] => 0 [processed] => 1 [artist_slug] => teebs [slug] => jon-hopkins-support [created] => 2014-07-09 16:41:29 [modified] => 2014-07-09 16:43:36 [embed] => ) [Country] => Array ( [id] => 122 [name] => United States [longname] => United States of America [numcode] => 840 [iso] => US [iso3] => USA [currency] => USD [active] => 1 [parent_id] => 117 [lft] => 241 [rght] => 242 [level] => 2 ) [Product] => Array ( ) [Artist] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => 133 [name] => Teebs [description] =>

Photo by Theo Jemison

Hypnotic. Warm. Organic. Tumbling. Pastoral. Ramshackle. Blissful. Expansive.

These are just some of the words that have been used to describe the work of Mtendere Mandowa, better known as Teebs.

A producer, a painter, and a key member of Brainfeeder clan, recent years have seen Teebs surge toward the top of the so-called "beat scene", and though his affiliation with Flying Lotus certainly has something to do with his ascent, it's ultimately the music - a billowing brand of beautifully off-kilter, hip-hop-colored beat construction - that has set Mandowa apart from what has become an increasingly crowded field of like-mind producers.

Teebs now makes his home in Northeast Los Angeles, but the 26-year-old producer wasn't always an Angeleno. Born in the Bronx, Mandowa's childhood also included time spent in Georgia and Hartford, Connecticut before his family switched coasts, stopping in Monterey Park, California before settling into the cozy LA suburb of Chino Hills. It was there that Teebs first truly took shape as an artist; he began painting in 2005 and started making music shortly thereafter, both by himself and as part of a collective known as My Hollow Drum.

It didn't take long for people to take notice. Around this time, Teebs linked up with online radio stronghold Dublab, and quickly saw his network increase exponentially. In 2008, he was invited to come to Barcelona and participate in that year's edition of the annual Red Bull Music Academy. This prompted fellow RBMA alum Flying Lotus to look him up; the two actually met at the now-legendary Low End Theory party in Los Angeles, and within six months, Teebs was living in the same apartment complex as FlyLo and sharing a spot with fellow LA beatmaker Samiyam. Watching those two work fueled his own creative impulses, and he began assembling what would eventually become Ardour, his first full-length album.

Ardour may have properly put Teebs on the electronic music map, but the somber release - the LP was partially inspired by the death of his father, which took place in the middle of the record's genesis - was just one of his many noteworthy efforts. He teamed up with fellow LA beatmakers Daedelus and Jeremiah Jae for split releases; he collaborated with UK producer Jackhigh (who now goes by BNJMN) on an intriguing EP called The Tropics and later joined forces with leftfield beat pioneer Prefuse 73 for the Sons of the Morning project and the Speak Soon, Volume One EP; Brainfeeder offered up the explorative and vaguely defined Collections mini-album; and the label arm of My Hollow Drum dropped limited runs of both Ardour B-Sides and the Cecilia Tapes Collection, the later of which collected music pieces that originally soundtracked one of Teebs' art exhibitions. He's also been busy on the road, frequently touring the globe, often in the company of his fellow Brainfeeder affiliates.

Despite all of this activity, on a personal level, the last couple of years have been a time of relative calm for Teebs. It was during this time that he put together E s t a r a, his second proper full-length. As opposed to the turmoil that accompanied the creation of Ardour, his new album is an effort inspired by his life as it stands now, and represents a time when Teebs has finally been able to make music completely on his own terms. The record takes its name from the house where much of the music was created, and it finds Teebs filling his sonic canvasses with the same kind of lush, textured sounds he's always used; the key difference is that he's now operating with a renewed sense of purpose and a streamlined musical narrative. The techniques haven't changed, but Teebs' mastery of them certainly has. In short, he's grown as an artist, and continues to confidently forge his own path forward. 

[links] =>

Big Cartel
Tumblr
Facebook
Instagram
Twitter
Soundcloud

[image_upload_id] => 19016 [label_id] => 7 [twitter_username] => teebsio [instagram_id] => 3173632 [instagram_username] => teebsio [link] => [listed] => 0 [sortname] => Teebs [created] => 2010-11-05 16:40:14 [modified] => 2014-02-06 23:18:29 [slug] => teebs [fuga_id] => [description_clean] =>

Photo by Theo Jemison

Hypnotic. Warm. Organic. Tumbling. Pastoral. Ramshackle. Blissful. Expansive.

These are just some of the words that have been used to describe the work of Mtendere Mandowa, better known as Teebs.

A producer, a painter, and a key member of Brainfeeder clan, recent years have seen Teebs surge toward the top of the so-called "beat scene", and though his affiliation with Flying Lotus certainly has something to do with his ascent, it's ultimately the music - a billowing brand of beautifully off-kilter, hip-hop-colored beat construction - that has set Mandowa apart from what has become an increasingly crowded field of like-mind producers.

Teebs now makes his home in Northeast Los Angeles, but the 26-year-old producer wasn't always an Angeleno. Born in the Bronx, Mandowa's childhood also included time spent in Georgia and Hartford, Connecticut before his family switched coasts, stopping in Monterey Park, California before settling into the cozy LA suburb of Chino Hills. It was there that Teebs first truly took shape as an artist; he began painting in 2005 and started making music shortly thereafter, both by himself and as part of a collective known as My Hollow Drum.

It didn't take long for people to take notice. Around this time, Teebs linked up with online radio stronghold Dublab, and quickly saw his network increase exponentially. In 2008, he was invited to come to Barcelona and participate in that year's edition of the annual Red Bull Music Academy. This prompted fellow RBMA alum Flying Lotus to look him up; the two actually met at the now-legendary Low End Theory party in Los Angeles, and within six months, Teebs was living in the same apartment complex as FlyLo and sharing a spot with fellow LA beatmaker Samiyam. Watching those two work fueled his own creative impulses, and he began assembling what would eventually become Ardour, his first full-length album.

Ardour may have properly put Teebs on the electronic music map, but the somber release - the LP was partially inspired by the death of his father, which took place in the middle of the record's genesis - was just one of his many noteworthy efforts. He teamed up with fellow LA beatmakers Daedelus and Jeremiah Jae for split releases; he collaborated with UK producer Jackhigh (who now goes by BNJMN) on an intriguing EP called The Tropics and later joined forces with leftfield beat pioneer Prefuse 73 for the Sons of the Morning project and the Speak Soon, Volume One EP; Brainfeeder offered up the explorative and vaguely defined Collections mini-album; and the label arm of My Hollow Drum dropped limited runs of both Ardour B-Sides and the Cecilia Tapes Collection, the later of which collected music pieces that originally soundtracked one of Teebs' art exhibitions. He's also been busy on the road, frequently touring the globe, often in the company of his fellow Brainfeeder affiliates.

Despite all of this activity, on a personal level, the last couple of years have been a time of relative calm for Teebs. It was during this time that he put together E s t a r a, his second proper full-length. As opposed to the turmoil that accompanied the creation of Ardour, his new album is an effort inspired by his life as it stands now, and represents a time when Teebs has finally been able to make music completely on his own terms. The record takes its name from the house where much of the music was created, and it finds Teebs filling his sonic canvasses with the same kind of lush, textured sounds he's always used; the key difference is that he's now operating with a renewed sense of purpose and a streamlined musical narrative. The techniques haven't changed, but Teebs' mastery of them certainly has. In short, he's grown as an artist, and continues to confidently forge his own path forward. 

[links_clean] =>

Big Cartel
Tumblr
Facebook
Instagram
Twitter
Soundcloud

) ) ) [3] => Array ( [Event] => Array ( [id] => 13158 [date] => 2014-07-24 [artist] => Romare [city] => London [state] => [country] => GB [venue] => Corsica Studios [promoter] => [description] => [ticket_url] => https://www.facebook.com/events/478924445575501 [image_upload_id] => 19139 [created] => 2014-07-11 16:55:56 [modified] => 2014-07-22 13:47:13 [year_slug] => 2014 [month_slug] => jul [day_slug] => 24 [slug] => romare-london-corsica-studios [description_clean] => [products_count] => 0 [hidden] => 0 ) [Image] => Array ( [id] => 19139 [media_type] => image [artist] => Romare [title] => Romare Press Shot 2014 [credits] => [buy_link] => [filename] => images/romare/Romare-2014.jpg [checksum] => c50e3f6723a9b26544fc01b276a245ab [mime_type] => image/jpeg [size] => 142799 [external_url] => http://media.ninjatune.net/images/romare/Romare-2014.jpg [image_upload_id] => [first_track_id] => [first_release_id] => [listed] => 0 [active] => 1 [processed] => 1 [artist_slug] => romare [slug] => romare-press-shot-2014 [created] => 2014-03-05 14:23:40 [modified] => 2014-03-05 14:25:14 [embed] => ) [Country] => Array ( [id] => 208 [name] => United Kingdom [longname] => United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland [numcode] => 826 [iso] => GB [iso3] => GBR [currency] => GBP [active] => 1 [parent_id] => 191 [lft] => 413 [rght] => 414 [level] => 2 ) [Product] => Array ( ) [Artist] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => 203 [name] => Romare [description] =>

Ninja Tune is very proud to announce the signing of Romare. One of the most exciting British talents to emerge from the electronic world of late, Romare’s music combines a seriousness of intent with a thrilling immediacy.

The discovery of revered American collagist Romare Bearden whilst at university became a lightning bolt moment, as is revealed by the moniker he chose for himself. More importantly, Bearden’s collages inspired the young musician to pursue a similar technique in his productions, harnessing its power to illuminate and assert through re-contextualisation.

With two vinyl EP releases on the excellent Black Acre label - Meditations on Afrocentrism (2012) and Love Songs: Part One (2013) - fiercely supported by the likes of Benji B, Gilles Peterson, Huw Stephens and BonoboRomare’s music has, rightfully, already caused a stir.

A true artist, Romare’s music moves the mind as much as the feet, its sense of detail married to its mood, melody and passion.

[links] =>

Website
Facebook
Twitter
SoundCloud
YouTube

[image_upload_id] => 19139 [label_id] => 1 [twitter_username] => romaremusic [instagram_id] => [instagram_username] => [link] => [listed] => 1 [sortname] => Romare [created] => 2014-03-05 10:29:46 [modified] => 2014-03-06 12:26:09 [slug] => romare [fuga_id] => [description_clean] =>

Ninja Tune is very proud to announce the signing of Romare. One of the most exciting British talents to emerge from the electronic world of late, Romare’s music combines a seriousness of intent with a thrilling immediacy.

The discovery of revered American collagist Romare Bearden whilst at university became a lightning bolt moment, as is revealed by the moniker he chose for himself. More importantly, Bearden’s collages inspired the young musician to pursue a similar technique in his productions, harnessing its power to illuminate and assert through re-contextualisation.

With two vinyl EP releases on the excellent Black Acre label - Meditations on Afrocentrism (2012) and Love Songs: Part One (2013) - fiercely supported by the likes of Benji B, Gilles Peterson, Huw Stephens and BonoboRomare’s music has, rightfully, already caused a stir.

A true artist, Romare’s music moves the mind as much as the feet, its sense of detail married to its mood, melody and passion.

[links_clean] =>

Website
Facebook
Twitter
SoundCloud
YouTube

) ) ) )
<< Previous
Artist Date City Venue Buy
Kelis Thursday, Jul 24th Melbourne, AU The Prince Bandroom Buy
The Gaslamp Killer Thursday, Jul 24th Utrecht, NL Tivoli
Teebs Thursday, Jul 24th San Francisco, US Mezzanine Buy
Romare Thursday, Jul 24th London, GB Corsica Studios Buy
Next >>