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The young electronic musician known as Romare wears his inspiration on his sleeve – in fact, he takes his very name from it. Having studied African American Visual Culture at University, he had his ‘Sex Pistols moment’ when he came across the work of Romare Bearden. The African American’s collaged, cut’n’paste artworks inspired the young musician to apply a similar technique to music – an approach that was hugely fruitful, and remains central to his work today. After stints as a drummer and guitarist throughout school and university, he moved to Paris where he picked up the turntables and began mixing his own music with samples from second hand records. Romare the musician was born and the template for his debut record.

Underground hothouse Black Acre signed him in 2012, adding him to a formidable roster that included Loops Haunt, Fantastic Mr Fox, Blue Daisy and Dark Sky. The imprint put out his first release Meditations on Afrocentrism in March of that year. He began to play shows, making enough money to finance a move to London. Ensconced in the vast musical melting pot of the capital, he began work on his second EP Love Songs: Part One. Romare’s songs were included on compilations by heavyweights such as Bonobo and Tiga, as well as the Brownswood Recordings imprint.

His debut album, Projections, is named after a pivotal exhibition of his namesake and likewise explores various elements of American life. The album is in many ways a homage to the cycle of cultural appropriation in America. “Work Song” is a tribute to the classic American and namesake work song, whilst “Rainbow” is a celebration of disco. Projections expertly catalogues the movements of influence within music. The album doesn’t just sample music and vocal snatches, but also other sources such as documentaries and marries live instrumentation with the sampling palette.

With fierce support from by the likes of Benji B, Gilles Peterson and Huw Stephens, Romare’s music has, rightfully, already caused a stir. The stage is now set for his stunning debut album, Projections.

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The young electronic musician known as Romare wears his inspiration on his sleeve – in fact, he takes his very name from it. Having studied African American Visual Culture at University, he had his ‘Sex Pistols moment’ when he came across the work of Romare Bearden. The African American’s collaged, cut’n’paste artworks inspired the young musician to apply a similar technique to music – an approach that was hugely fruitful, and remains central to his work today. After stints as a drummer and guitarist throughout school and university, he moved to Paris where he picked up the turntables and began mixing his own music with samples from second hand records. Romare the musician was born and the template for his debut record.

Underground hothouse Black Acre signed him in 2012, adding him to a formidable roster that included Loops Haunt, Fantastic Mr Fox, Blue Daisy and Dark Sky. The imprint put out his first release Meditations on Afrocentrism in March of that year. He began to play shows, making enough money to finance a move to London. Ensconced in the vast musical melting pot of the capital, he began work on his second EP Love Songs: Part One. Romare’s songs were included on compilations by heavyweights such as Bonobo and Tiga, as well as the Brownswood Recordings imprint.

His debut album, Projections, is named after a pivotal exhibition of his namesake and likewise explores various elements of American life. The album is in many ways a homage to the cycle of cultural appropriation in America. “Work Song” is a tribute to the classic American and namesake work song, whilst “Rainbow” is a celebration of disco. Projections expertly catalogues the movements of influence within music. The album doesn’t just sample music and vocal snatches, but also other sources such as documentaries and marries live instrumentation with the sampling palette.

With fierce support from by the likes of Benji B, Gilles Peterson and Huw Stephens, Romare’s music has, rightfully, already caused a stir. The stage is now set for his stunning debut album, Projections.

[links_clean] =>

Website
Facebook
Twitter
SoundCloud
YouTube

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Richard Kylea Cowie (born 19 January 1979), better known by his stage name Wiley, is perhaps the most prolific British producer, rapper and recording artist to emerge in the last twenty years. He has made pioneering music in the fields of jungle, drum & bass and UK garage, but is best known as the originator and Godfather of Grime, the uniquely British take on rap music which roared out of east London in the early noughties. Since then he has straddled the mainstream and the underground, irritated and amazed people in equal measure and carved out a unique career path which he has more or less had to make up as he has  gone along.

Wiley's earliest recordings date back to 1997, when he featured on pirate radio rapping over jungle beats. In 2000, Wiley joined with "The Hit Squad" garage crew with school friends DJ Target and MC Maxwell D. They achieved some success on the UKG scene but then decided to combine with rival crew Pay As U Go to become a "super crew," containing the Ladies Hit Squad members plus DJ Slimzee and MC's Major Ace and Plague. God's Gift, Flow Dan and Riko joined soon after. In 2002 the collective achieved a top 40 hit with "Champagne Dance"

Soon after, the crew disintegrated due to individual members having differing ideas of the direction the crew should take. Wiley went on to form the Roll Deep collective, which included Dizzee Rascal and Tinchy Stryder as MCs. Wiley’s vision saw him stripping the generic melodies and sickly harmonies out of garage music and developing the drums and basslines. For a while there was no name for the genre he did more than anyone to create, but eventually the label "grime" was the one that stuck.  From 2001, Wiley produced a slew of instrumental singles on his WileyKat Record label, the best known being "Eskimo", "Avalanche" and "Ice Rink". The underground notoriety he achieved led to his being offered a recording deal with the legendary XL Recordings.

In 2004, Wiley released his debut album, 'Treddin' on Thin Ice' with his new label. Singles from the album included, "Wot Do U Call It?" which mocked the various names given to his music, and "Pies”, which showed his humorous side. Reviews such as in Pitchfork Media made comparisons between Wiley and his previous labelmate Dizzee Rascal, who had achieved success with Boy in Da Corner the previous year. Alexis Petridis of The Guardian noted the "comically polarised" fanbase Wiley had accrued; "At one extreme, its sonic experimentation has attracted the kind of people who run music blogs... [where] lengthy essays are posted on issues as the differentiation between Humean and Kantian views of motivation in the lyrics of Bonnie Prince Billy. At the other extreme, it is favoured by inner city teens who appear to communicate entirely in an impenetrable mix of street slang and patois."

During this period, Wiley occasionally referred to his music as "Eski", short for 'Eskibeat' – the name he initially gave to grime. He also released mixtapes under the name "Eskiboy". He explained his choice of name for his music and the continuing theme in his song and album titles such as 'Treddin' on Thin Ice', partly because he likes the wintertime, but mainly meaning cold in spirit. "Sometimes I just feel cold hearted. I felt cold at that time, towards my family, towards everyone. That's why I used those names.”

Many of Wiley's early vinyl releases, such as 'Eskimo', were released under the alias "Wiley Kat", this name was derived from a character in the cartoon Thundercats. However, the 'Kat' is never officially used by Wiley anymore, only being mentioned loosely in some of his songs.

In 2006, Wiley released his second album 'Da 2nd Phaze' on the Boy Better Know label. The album consists of 20 tracks that had been put together by Wiley from the past three years of work, including exclusive bonus tracks from God’s Gift, Alex Mills and More Fire Crew, the latter signaling the end of the Wiley-Lethal Bizzle feud.

This was followed in by Wiley's third album, 'Playtime is Over'  on Big Dada Records, which combined artistic control for Wiley with a full scale release on a recognised label. Wiley was thrilled at the opportunity to be allowed to make a grime record as he saw it, and he formed a relationship with the label that outlasted any other he’s had in the industry.

In May 2008, Wiley found mainstream chart success with the hit single, "Wearing My Rolex". The instrumentation (such as the slower, house style beat and lack of sub bass) caused some unrest within the Grime scene, as Wiley had publicly vowed that he would never leave grime music to break into the mainstream. In the same month, Wiley released his fourth album entitled Grime Wave, which was described by The Times as a "very pre-Rolex album. With its roots firmly based in the harsh, bass-heavy rhythms of the scene".  

This album was followed by See Clear Now, in October 2008 which included the mainstream hits "Wearing My Rolex", "Cash In My Pocket" and "Summertime". This album took Wiley in a mainstream direction. Despite its success, Wiley has disowned the album as he was "very angry" with the label, Asylum, about the production and also unhappy about his management at the time.

Now on his own label, Wiley went on to make another album, Race Against Time. This was released eight months after his previous album in June 2009, on Eskibeat Recordings and again he had much more creative control, if little time and few resources to organise the release effectively. The album includes the 2009 hit "Too Many Man", featuring Boy Better Know.

In 2010 Wiley released 11 Zip Files for free download on his Twitter page, containing over 200 tracks of old and unreleased music, including tracks from the forthcoming album 'The Elusive'. The following year, Wiley announced his return to the Big Dada label, and the release of '100% Publishing' . The album is perhaps best remembered for “Numbers In Action” and its innovative video, for which Wiley won a Video Music Award. 

Less than six months later, he released his third album with Big Dada, 'Evolve Or Be Extinct' , including skits set in taxi cabs and at immigration as well as lighthearted bangers like “Boom Blast” and “I’m Skanking” alongside harder material such as “Scar”. Soon after the record’s release Wiley began leaking grime freestyles over grime beats and releasing them for free via Twitter. This collection was released chronologically with the names "Step 1", "Step 2" and so on. After "Step 10", all of the freestyles were compiled and released as a mixtape titled It's All Fun and Games Till, Vol. 1. Alongside working on his "Step" freestyles, various other promo songs were released. Wiley carried on with his "Step" freestyles, releasing Vol. 2 of It's All Fun and Games Till.

In June 2012, Wiley released his summer single "Heatwave", featuring Ms D and produced by Rymez. On 5 August 2012, "Heatwave" peaked at number 1 on the UK Singles Chart, making this Wiley's first solo number 1, selling an impressive 114,000 copies. His next single, announced in late August, titled "Can You Hear Me" featuring Skepta, JME and Ms D, was released in October 2012. The song was renamed to "Can You Hear Me (Ayayaya)".

Alongside a series of harder-edged releases on Big Dada, Wiley devoted much of 2013 to the promotion of his Warner album, ‘The Ascent’, inclduing his infamous appearance at Glastonbury that summer, culminating in his all-time classic Tweet: “Fuck them and their farm.” On 11 October 2013, a petition was presented to Tower Hamlets' mayor Lutfur Rahman signed by over 2,000 Wiley fans, requesting that a monument to the artist be erected in Bow. On 19 October 2013, Wiley was awarded 'Best Male' at the MOBO Award's 18th Anniversary. 

Wiley remains one of the biggest characters and wildest talents in British music. Whether helping younger artists break through (Dizzee, Chipmunk, Tinchy), offloading hundreds of unreleashed tracks on Twitter, rowing with detractors or doling out private insights on the web – he is always in the studio. Ultimately a workaholic, he’s the kind of artist one can imagine making groundbreaking, avant-garde music well into his old age. A true maverick and an artist in the truest sense of the word, we’re lucky to have Wiley. We should make the most of it. But he probably won’t let us.

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Richard Kylea Cowie (born 19 January 1979), better known by his stage name Wiley, is perhaps the most prolific British producer, rapper and recording artist to emerge in the last twenty years. He has made pioneering music in the fields of jungle, drum & bass and UK garage, but is best known as the originator and Godfather of Grime, the uniquely British take on rap music which roared out of east London in the early noughties. Since then he has straddled the mainstream and the underground, irritated and amazed people in equal measure and carved out a unique career path which he has more or less had to make up as he has  gone along.

Wiley's earliest recordings date back to 1997, when he featured on pirate radio rapping over jungle beats. In 2000, Wiley joined with "The Hit Squad" garage crew with school friends DJ Target and MC Maxwell D. They achieved some success on the UKG scene but then decided to combine with rival crew Pay As U Go to become a "super crew," containing the Ladies Hit Squad members plus DJ Slimzee and MC's Major Ace and Plague. God's Gift, Flow Dan and Riko joined soon after. In 2002 the collective achieved a top 40 hit with "Champagne Dance"

Soon after, the crew disintegrated due to individual members having differing ideas of the direction the crew should take. Wiley went on to form the Roll Deep collective, which included Dizzee Rascal and Tinchy Stryder as MCs. Wiley’s vision saw him stripping the generic melodies and sickly harmonies out of garage music and developing the drums and basslines. For a while there was no name for the genre he did more than anyone to create, but eventually the label "grime" was the one that stuck.  From 2001, Wiley produced a slew of instrumental singles on his WileyKat Record label, the best known being "Eskimo", "Avalanche" and "Ice Rink". The underground notoriety he achieved led to his being offered a recording deal with the legendary XL Recordings.

In 2004, Wiley released his debut album, 'Treddin' on Thin Ice' with his new label. Singles from the album included, "Wot Do U Call It?" which mocked the various names given to his music, and "Pies”, which showed his humorous side. Reviews such as in Pitchfork Media made comparisons between Wiley and his previous labelmate Dizzee Rascal, who had achieved success with Boy in Da Corner the previous year. Alexis Petridis of The Guardian noted the "comically polarised" fanbase Wiley had accrued; "At one extreme, its sonic experimentation has attracted the kind of people who run music blogs... [where] lengthy essays are posted on issues as the differentiation between Humean and Kantian views of motivation in the lyrics of Bonnie Prince Billy. At the other extreme, it is favoured by inner city teens who appear to communicate entirely in an impenetrable mix of street slang and patois."

During this period, Wiley occasionally referred to his music as "Eski", short for 'Eskibeat' – the name he initially gave to grime. He also released mixtapes under the name "Eskiboy". He explained his choice of name for his music and the continuing theme in his song and album titles such as 'Treddin' on Thin Ice', partly because he likes the wintertime, but mainly meaning cold in spirit. "Sometimes I just feel cold hearted. I felt cold at that time, towards my family, towards everyone. That's why I used those names.”

Many of Wiley's early vinyl releases, such as 'Eskimo', were released under the alias "Wiley Kat", this name was derived from a character in the cartoon Thundercats. However, the 'Kat' is never officially used by Wiley anymore, only being mentioned loosely in some of his songs.

In 2006, Wiley released his second album 'Da 2nd Phaze' on the Boy Better Know label. The album consists of 20 tracks that had been put together by Wiley from the past three years of work, including exclusive bonus tracks from God’s Gift, Alex Mills and More Fire Crew, the latter signaling the end of the Wiley-Lethal Bizzle feud.

This was followed in by Wiley's third album, 'Playtime is Over'  on Big Dada Records, which combined artistic control for Wiley with a full scale release on a recognised label. Wiley was thrilled at the opportunity to be allowed to make a grime record as he saw it, and he formed a relationship with the label that outlasted any other he’s had in the industry.

In May 2008, Wiley found mainstream chart success with the hit single, "Wearing My Rolex". The instrumentation (such as the slower, house style beat and lack of sub bass) caused some unrest within the Grime scene, as Wiley had publicly vowed that he would never leave grime music to break into the mainstream. In the same month, Wiley released his fourth album entitled Grime Wave, which was described by The Times as a "very pre-Rolex album. With its roots firmly based in the harsh, bass-heavy rhythms of the scene".  

This album was followed by See Clear Now, in October 2008 which included the mainstream hits "Wearing My Rolex", "Cash In My Pocket" and "Summertime". This album took Wiley in a mainstream direction. Despite its success, Wiley has disowned the album as he was "very angry" with the label, Asylum, about the production and also unhappy about his management at the time.

Now on his own label, Wiley went on to make another album, Race Against Time. This was released eight months after his previous album in June 2009, on Eskibeat Recordings and again he had much more creative control, if little time and few resources to organise the release effectively. The album includes the 2009 hit "Too Many Man", featuring Boy Better Know.

In 2010 Wiley released 11 Zip Files for free download on his Twitter page, containing over 200 tracks of old and unreleased music, including tracks from the forthcoming album 'The Elusive'. The following year, Wiley announced his return to the Big Dada label, and the release of '100% Publishing' . The album is perhaps best remembered for “Numbers In Action” and its innovative video, for which Wiley won a Video Music Award. 

Less than six months later, he released his third album with Big Dada, 'Evolve Or Be Extinct' , including skits set in taxi cabs and at immigration as well as lighthearted bangers like “Boom Blast” and “I’m Skanking” alongside harder material such as “Scar”. Soon after the record’s release Wiley began leaking grime freestyles over grime beats and releasing them for free via Twitter. This collection was released chronologically with the names "Step 1", "Step 2" and so on. After "Step 10", all of the freestyles were compiled and released as a mixtape titled It's All Fun and Games Till, Vol. 1. Alongside working on his "Step" freestyles, various other promo songs were released. Wiley carried on with his "Step" freestyles, releasing Vol. 2 of It's All Fun and Games Till.

In June 2012, Wiley released his summer single "Heatwave", featuring Ms D and produced by Rymez. On 5 August 2012, "Heatwave" peaked at number 1 on the UK Singles Chart, making this Wiley's first solo number 1, selling an impressive 114,000 copies. His next single, announced in late August, titled "Can You Hear Me" featuring Skepta, JME and Ms D, was released in October 2012. The song was renamed to "Can You Hear Me (Ayayaya)".

Alongside a series of harder-edged releases on Big Dada, Wiley devoted much of 2013 to the promotion of his Warner album, ‘The Ascent’, inclduing his infamous appearance at Glastonbury that summer, culminating in his all-time classic Tweet: “Fuck them and their farm.” On 11 October 2013, a petition was presented to Tower Hamlets' mayor Lutfur Rahman signed by over 2,000 Wiley fans, requesting that a monument to the artist be erected in Bow. On 19 October 2013, Wiley was awarded 'Best Male' at the MOBO Award's 18th Anniversary. 

Wiley remains one of the biggest characters and wildest talents in British music. Whether helping younger artists break through (Dizzee, Chipmunk, Tinchy), offloading hundreds of unreleashed tracks on Twitter, rowing with detractors or doling out private insights on the web – he is always in the studio. Ultimately a workaholic, he’s the kind of artist one can imagine making groundbreaking, avant-garde music well into his old age. A true maverick and an artist in the truest sense of the word, we’re lucky to have Wiley. We should make the most of it. But he probably won’t let us.

[links_clean] =>

www.wileymusic.co.uk

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Fin Greenall, who is the voice and heart behind Fink, often gets mistaken for other people. 

At the BMI Awards in the US, a ‘roomful of gangstas and playas’ were convinced the Cornwall-born, Bristol-raised Englishman was a lawyer, and not a songwriter picking up an ‘American Urban’ gong – one of three BMIs he received for his work with John Legend on the soul singer’s Evolver album.

In Berlin, clubbing capital of the world, they think he helps run a small minimal techno label. In certain London circles he’s known as the hardworking insider whose past roles at DefJam, Sony Music, Talkin’ Loud, and Source saw him work with a range of artists longer than the horizon. At the BBC, they imagine Fink as perhaps the only musician who has played both the Electric Proms and the actual Proms (was that really the same guy leading a 120-piece orchestra at the Royal Albert Hall in an ‘immense’ cover of Roy Ayers’ Everybody Loves The Sunshine?). 

In record company circles, he’s the producer who worked on the first demos by Amy Winehouse and the writer who’s been crafting hooks for Professor Green. In big-room booths around the world, he’s the internationally-renowned DJ and Ninja Tune stalwart who finally hung up his Sennheisers with a valedictory set at London’s Fabric in 2003. ‘My skillset just seemed so old compared to these guys that could DJ for six hours without one high-hat out of place using Ableton or something,’ he notes admiringly.

Who is Fin Greenall? All of the above. 

Yes, the now-Brighton-based musician acknowledges, he has done – does do – all of those things. ‘But none of that is as important as how I feel when I write songs like "Fear is Like Fire" and "Perfect Darkness". The Fink thing is my main thing.’

As a kid, the one thing of his dad’s that Fin Greenall wasn’t allowed to touch was the old Martin acoustic guitar. ‘It was his one possession where he said, “everything in this house is owned by everybody – apart from that.”’ But with age – and the burgeoning of his son’s skills as a player – came a relaxation of the exclusion zone: Greenall plays the Martin on the punchy, Jeff Buckley-covering-Radiohead-esque "Fear Is Like Fire". It’s sure to become a live stand-out on Fink’s upcoming, 18-month-long world tour. ‘It’s all about trying to look at fear and be optimistic – you can be really negative or fucking embrace it and use it. 

‘The great thing about growing up in a house where music is a big factor,’ he continues, ‘was the fact that music being part of your life was a perfectly natural thing.’ 

Music, it seems, became more than that: it was Greenall’s life. He hoovered up the sounds he heard on John Peel: ‘The Cure, The Smiths, The Orb, African music, Japanese hardcore’. He embraced skateboarding, the music and the fashion – ‘it was an awesome way to grow your own culture’. At university in Leeds, electronic and dance music became everything. 

‘It was definitely about wanting to be part of a revolution that I could call my own,’ he recalls. ‘A couple of friends and I clubbed together our student loans and bought equipment to make ambient techno – we were really inspired by Aphex Twin and The Orb and Moby. We were amazed at how fucking easy it was to make ambient techno. It wasn’t easy to make good ambient techno,’ he laughs. ‘But it was easy enough to make techno good enough to get us signed after six months of mucking around at uni.’ 

The young techno warrior was messianic. 

‘I thought the song was dead, the chorus was dead, playing drums and guitar and bass was so old-school and outdated and why would you want to do that? Dylan did that 50 years ago! We should be part of this new revolution, instrumentalism, acid house, rave culture, techno – this stuff is a brave new avant-garde frontier and you should be involved.’ 

His ardour and his skills saw Greenall become part of the Ninja Tune family – first signed on the back of a cassette-tape demo - as artist, DJ, writer, producer, and remixer. 

‘Brilliant times,’ he sighs nostalgically. ‘Sometimes you’d just have to pinch yourself. Then, other times, you wake up in Bratislava on a Tuesday morning and you’re reminded that there is hard work to all of this.’ All that crate-digging wasn’t all it’s cracked up to be either: ‘You can’t be shit!’ Greenall grins. ‘And because of the community that Ninja has worldwide, if you are shit everybody knows about it the next day. Eight years of DJing have given me an obscenely huge record collection. I just cleared out the breaks section – four crates of twelves that were total pony!’ 

So the wheels of steel started to fall off. 

‘It wasn’t until I’d run that right the way through to its natural conclusion – I’m an international DJ on the biggest DJ label in the world – that I thought: I’m kinda over it. And it was actually working with a young artist straight out of school called Amy Winehouse that inspired me to go, “wow, songs are great! Now I get how difficult it is, and how much talent there is involved in this. It’s more of a challenge than clubbing.”’ 

Greenall melted down his turntables and recast them as a guitar and a stool. Metaphorically speaking. His parents were pleased. ‘My career only made sense to them when I picked up a guitar and started to sing,’ he says. ‘All of a sudden I was doing music, I wasn’t just mucking around. But in my rave days, DJing techno and breaks, they didn’t get that at all. That’s probably why I did it in the first place. 

‘But I realised: if your music had songs in it, it had a much greater reach. Not in business terms, but if a singer of, say, Amy’s calibre sings over this beat, it becomes so much bigger than just a beat. I can’t get rid of my clubbing past, not that I’d want to. But the linear nature of some of my music is definitely because of all those years spent clubbing and DJing, when a very simple idea can make the best club record. And it’s the same with songs – I’m after a really simple riff or really simple lyric or melody. And it’s about keeping that beautiful moment going for as long as you can.’

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Fin Greenall, who is the voice and heart behind Fink, often gets mistaken for other people. 

At the BMI Awards in the US, a ‘roomful of gangstas and playas’ were convinced the Cornwall-born, Bristol-raised Englishman was a lawyer, and not a songwriter picking up an ‘American Urban’ gong – one of three BMIs he received for his work with John Legend on the soul singer’s Evolver album.

In Berlin, clubbing capital of the world, they think he helps run a small minimal techno label. In certain London circles he’s known as the hardworking insider whose past roles at DefJam, Sony Music, Talkin’ Loud, and Source saw him work with a range of artists longer than the horizon. At the BBC, they imagine Fink as perhaps the only musician who has played both the Electric Proms and the actual Proms (was that really the same guy leading a 120-piece orchestra at the Royal Albert Hall in an ‘immense’ cover of Roy Ayers’ Everybody Loves The Sunshine?). 

In record company circles, he’s the producer who worked on the first demos by Amy Winehouse and the writer who’s been crafting hooks for Professor Green. In big-room booths around the world, he’s the internationally-renowned DJ and Ninja Tune stalwart who finally hung up his Sennheisers with a valedictory set at London’s Fabric in 2003. ‘My skillset just seemed so old compared to these guys that could DJ for six hours without one high-hat out of place using Ableton or something,’ he notes admiringly.

Who is Fin Greenall? All of the above. 

Yes, the now-Brighton-based musician acknowledges, he has done – does do – all of those things. ‘But none of that is as important as how I feel when I write songs like "Fear is Like Fire" and "Perfect Darkness". The Fink thing is my main thing.’

As a kid, the one thing of his dad’s that Fin Greenall wasn’t allowed to touch was the old Martin acoustic guitar. ‘It was his one possession where he said, “everything in this house is owned by everybody – apart from that.”’ But with age – and the burgeoning of his son’s skills as a player – came a relaxation of the exclusion zone: Greenall plays the Martin on the punchy, Jeff Buckley-covering-Radiohead-esque "Fear Is Like Fire". It’s sure to become a live stand-out on Fink’s upcoming, 18-month-long world tour. ‘It’s all about trying to look at fear and be optimistic – you can be really negative or fucking embrace it and use it. 

‘The great thing about growing up in a house where music is a big factor,’ he continues, ‘was the fact that music being part of your life was a perfectly natural thing.’ 

Music, it seems, became more than that: it was Greenall’s life. He hoovered up the sounds he heard on John Peel: ‘The Cure, The Smiths, The Orb, African music, Japanese hardcore’. He embraced skateboarding, the music and the fashion – ‘it was an awesome way to grow your own culture’. At university in Leeds, electronic and dance music became everything. 

‘It was definitely about wanting to be part of a revolution that I could call my own,’ he recalls. ‘A couple of friends and I clubbed together our student loans and bought equipment to make ambient techno – we were really inspired by Aphex Twin and The Orb and Moby. We were amazed at how fucking easy it was to make ambient techno. It wasn’t easy to make good ambient techno,’ he laughs. ‘But it was easy enough to make techno good enough to get us signed after six months of mucking around at uni.’ 

The young techno warrior was messianic. 

‘I thought the song was dead, the chorus was dead, playing drums and guitar and bass was so old-school and outdated and why would you want to do that? Dylan did that 50 years ago! We should be part of this new revolution, instrumentalism, acid house, rave culture, techno – this stuff is a brave new avant-garde frontier and you should be involved.’ 

His ardour and his skills saw Greenall become part of the Ninja Tune family – first signed on the back of a cassette-tape demo - as artist, DJ, writer, producer, and remixer. 

‘Brilliant times,’ he sighs nostalgically. ‘Sometimes you’d just have to pinch yourself. Then, other times, you wake up in Bratislava on a Tuesday morning and you’re reminded that there is hard work to all of this.’ All that crate-digging wasn’t all it’s cracked up to be either: ‘You can’t be shit!’ Greenall grins. ‘And because of the community that Ninja has worldwide, if you are shit everybody knows about it the next day. Eight years of DJing have given me an obscenely huge record collection. I just cleared out the breaks section – four crates of twelves that were total pony!’ 

So the wheels of steel started to fall off. 

‘It wasn’t until I’d run that right the way through to its natural conclusion – I’m an international DJ on the biggest DJ label in the world – that I thought: I’m kinda over it. And it was actually working with a young artist straight out of school called Amy Winehouse that inspired me to go, “wow, songs are great! Now I get how difficult it is, and how much talent there is involved in this. It’s more of a challenge than clubbing.”’ 

Greenall melted down his turntables and recast them as a guitar and a stool. Metaphorically speaking. His parents were pleased. ‘My career only made sense to them when I picked up a guitar and started to sing,’ he says. ‘All of a sudden I was doing music, I wasn’t just mucking around. But in my rave days, DJing techno and breaks, they didn’t get that at all. That’s probably why I did it in the first place. 

‘But I realised: if your music had songs in it, it had a much greater reach. Not in business terms, but if a singer of, say, Amy’s calibre sings over this beat, it becomes so much bigger than just a beat. I can’t get rid of my clubbing past, not that I’d want to. But the linear nature of some of my music is definitely because of all those years spent clubbing and DJing, when a very simple idea can make the best club record. And it’s the same with songs – I’m after a really simple riff or really simple lyric or melody. And it’s about keeping that beautiful moment going for as long as you can.’

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Kieren Gallear aka DELS is a new type of rapper (which is another way of saying that he’s more than just a rapper). Applying the kind of attention to detail, micro-management and macro-vision which Jay-Z used to build a business empire, DELS makes art. Popular art mind you, but art all the same, an album of emotional peaks, musical innovation and surreal, brilliant lyrics, held together by a strong, unique vision.

Gallear “never set out to be a rapper. It just happened. I was always obsessed with words. I was always cutting out random letterforms from newspapers or books because I liked the way that they sat on the page visually. This lead to me scribbling random thoughts into the back of school books and eventually picking up the mic to record those thoughts on a beat. I loved the freedom of how words can sit together in hip hop.”

An early break came when Suffolk resident John Peel heard DELS and his crew rapping at a local event and asked them to come on to his show on Radio 1. Ten years later and Gallear was back recording a session for the DJ’s spiritual heir at the station, Huw Stephens. But the intervening decade wasn’t wasted on selling weed, or unemployment, or running with a gang or any of the cliches of “urban” music. In his methodical, thoughtful way, Gallear put his efforts into his education. “Studying illustration, film, photography and Graphic Design. Attempting to forge a career within the arts, which then led to me combining it all with my music. ‘I’d been working on GOB since 2007, behind the scenes,” he says of his 2011 debut LP.

Gallear worked with three complementary but very different producers on his debut album. One of the people listening in on that Peel session was Joe Goddard, then of an unknown band called Hot Chip. He got in touch and the two began working together, cementing a friendship which finds its pinnacle in their collaborations on GOB. Micachu, on the other hand, is best known for her work with her band The Shapes, their classification as “indie” largely ignoring her classical training and long-term interest in grime. Kwes, recently signed to Warp Records in his own right, has worked with Damon Albarn, The XX, The Invisible and Speech Debelle. “They all provided me with challenging, but very inspiring music that enabled me to roam free creatively,” DELS explains. “Kwes, Joe Goddard and Micachu helped me shape a sound that is very difficult to box within one specific genre tag, which is exactly what I wanted with that album. I wanted the music to take on a life of it’s own. And not take itself too seriously!”

After the record's release, Gallear went on the road with a three piece band which completely re-wrote the rules of live hip hop, finding a sound which was as near to New Order as it was to the Roots. He has toured all over Europe, playing festivals and clubs and developing further his reputation for a kind of emotional openness which is pretty much unique in hip hop. Over the last few months, DELS has begun to work furiously on a new album. The Black Salad EP, which received repeat plays from Zane Lowe, Annie Mac and Huw Stephens at Radio 1, is a taster of what's to come. Lead track Bird Milk made its debut in an earlier form on the Kwesachu Volume 2 mixtape and DELS is keeping the same core of collaborators while reaching out to new producers for his second album.

That album is now complete. A stunning consolidation of everything that makes DELS great, as well as a giant leap forward sonically and imaginatively, Petals Have Fallen is an ultra-modern hip-hop masterpiece.

Kwes took a more hands-on, directorial role on this record, stepping forward to executive produce the album. Other collaborators represent the renaissance of fruitful, purposeful experimental music that’s come of age in London of late. Rosie Lowe, singer, songwriter and instrumentalist, recently signed to Paul Epworth’s Wolf Tone label, lends her shimmering vocal skill to the starkly beautiful Burning Beaches. Micachu, fresh from creating one of the most startling and effective soundtracks of recent years for Jonathan Glazer’s Under the Skin, re-appears to lend her inimitable, visceral sonic genius to standout RGB.

South London avant-songstress Kerry Leatham has one of the finest voices and most original approaches to her craft that the capital has produced in recent years - she lends her considerable talent to Pulls. Add electronic music powerhouse and Ninja Tune legend Bonobo into the mix, as well as Mizz Beats, Eli-T and Kwes’ brilliant younger brother Coby Sey, and Kwes had a potent arsenal of musicians at his executive producer’s fingertips.

The album was recorded and produced in Kwes’ shipping container studio in London’s docklands, over a period of 18 months. Most of the actual writing took place in DELS’ flat in Peckham. ‘I found it difficult to write during the day,’ DELS says. ‘The songs always seemed to come together late at night as I laid bed, writing down my thoughts on my phone.’ Though this may have been a tortuous method for the writer, it’s an approach that’s delivered in spades for the listener. Petals Have Fallen is imbued with a late-night, soul-baring intimacy that’s rare on any sort of album, let alone in hip-hop. Like all the best records, the album is a self-contained universe, a window into DELS world that draws you gratefully in.

The album is also highly visual, casually littered with striking images. ‘The most ritualistic thing I did whilst I wrote the songs was pinning up visuals around me for inspiration. I’d often have movies that have meant so much to me over the years, like Akira, Blade Runner, Alien and The Shining, on in the background with no sound,’ DELS says. ‘I also had a few of my own landscape portraits and illustrations pinned up on the walls too.’

Petals Have Fallen is one of the first classic albums from a scene of musicians that has been years in the making, and marks a true resurgence of artistically worthwhile but viscerally thrilling music from London.

"I met most of the artists and producers that contributed to this album on MySpace back in 2005," DELS remembers. We had a page called “Loners", where myself and the likes of Kwes, Micachu, Ghostpoet, Sampha, Coby Sey, Elan Tamara were all featured – way before anybody knew who we were. We always said that we'd do a proper album together eventually. Petals Have Fallen is probably the closest thing to that collaborative album happening to date’

Petals Have Fallen is a classic album from this astonishing musician, and his talented crop of friends.

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Kieren Gallear aka DELS is a new type of rapper (which is another way of saying that he’s more than just a rapper). Applying the kind of attention to detail, micro-management and macro-vision which Jay-Z used to build a business empire, DELS makes art. Popular art mind you, but art all the same, an album of emotional peaks, musical innovation and surreal, brilliant lyrics, held together by a strong, unique vision.

Gallear “never set out to be a rapper. It just happened. I was always obsessed with words. I was always cutting out random letterforms from newspapers or books because I liked the way that they sat on the page visually. This lead to me scribbling random thoughts into the back of school books and eventually picking up the mic to record those thoughts on a beat. I loved the freedom of how words can sit together in hip hop.”

An early break came when Suffolk resident John Peel heard DELS and his crew rapping at a local event and asked them to come on to his show on Radio 1. Ten years later and Gallear was back recording a session for the DJ’s spiritual heir at the station, Huw Stephens. But the intervening decade wasn’t wasted on selling weed, or unemployment, or running with a gang or any of the cliches of “urban” music. In his methodical, thoughtful way, Gallear put his efforts into his education. “Studying illustration, film, photography and Graphic Design. Attempting to forge a career within the arts, which then led to me combining it all with my music. ‘I’d been working on GOB since 2007, behind the scenes,” he says of his 2011 debut LP.

Gallear worked with three complementary but very different producers on his debut album. One of the people listening in on that Peel session was Joe Goddard, then of an unknown band called Hot Chip. He got in touch and the two began working together, cementing a friendship which finds its pinnacle in their collaborations on GOB. Micachu, on the other hand, is best known for her work with her band The Shapes, their classification as “indie” largely ignoring her classical training and long-term interest in grime. Kwes, recently signed to Warp Records in his own right, has worked with Damon Albarn, The XX, The Invisible and Speech Debelle. “They all provided me with challenging, but very inspiring music that enabled me to roam free creatively,” DELS explains. “Kwes, Joe Goddard and Micachu helped me shape a sound that is very difficult to box within one specific genre tag, which is exactly what I wanted with that album. I wanted the music to take on a life of it’s own. And not take itself too seriously!”

After the record's release, Gallear went on the road with a three piece band which completely re-wrote the rules of live hip hop, finding a sound which was as near to New Order as it was to the Roots. He has toured all over Europe, playing festivals and clubs and developing further his reputation for a kind of emotional openness which is pretty much unique in hip hop. Over the last few months, DELS has begun to work furiously on a new album. The Black Salad EP, which received repeat plays from Zane Lowe, Annie Mac and Huw Stephens at Radio 1, is a taster of what's to come. Lead track Bird Milk made its debut in an earlier form on the Kwesachu Volume 2 mixtape and DELS is keeping the same core of collaborators while reaching out to new producers for his second album.

That album is now complete. A stunning consolidation of everything that makes DELS great, as well as a giant leap forward sonically and imaginatively, Petals Have Fallen is an ultra-modern hip-hop masterpiece.

Kwes took a more hands-on, directorial role on this record, stepping forward to executive produce the album. Other collaborators represent the renaissance of fruitful, purposeful experimental music that’s come of age in London of late. Rosie Lowe, singer, songwriter and instrumentalist, recently signed to Paul Epworth’s Wolf Tone label, lends her shimmering vocal skill to the starkly beautiful Burning Beaches. Micachu, fresh from creating one of the most startling and effective soundtracks of recent years for Jonathan Glazer’s Under the Skin, re-appears to lend her inimitable, visceral sonic genius to standout RGB.

South London avant-songstress Kerry Leatham has one of the finest voices and most original approaches to her craft that the capital has produced in recent years - she lends her considerable talent to Pulls. Add electronic music powerhouse and Ninja Tune legend Bonobo into the mix, as well as Mizz Beats, Eli-T and Kwes’ brilliant younger brother Coby Sey, and Kwes had a potent arsenal of musicians at his executive producer’s fingertips.

The album was recorded and produced in Kwes’ shipping container studio in London’s docklands, over a period of 18 months. Most of the actual writing took place in DELS’ flat in Peckham. ‘I found it difficult to write during the day,’ DELS says. ‘The songs always seemed to come together late at night as I laid bed, writing down my thoughts on my phone.’ Though this may have been a tortuous method for the writer, it’s an approach that’s delivered in spades for the listener. Petals Have Fallen is imbued with a late-night, soul-baring intimacy that’s rare on any sort of album, let alone in hip-hop. Like all the best records, the album is a self-contained universe, a window into DELS world that draws you gratefully in.

The album is also highly visual, casually littered with striking images. ‘The most ritualistic thing I did whilst I wrote the songs was pinning up visuals around me for inspiration. I’d often have movies that have meant so much to me over the years, like Akira, Blade Runner, Alien and The Shining, on in the background with no sound,’ DELS says. ‘I also had a few of my own landscape portraits and illustrations pinned up on the walls too.’

Petals Have Fallen is one of the first classic albums from a scene of musicians that has been years in the making, and marks a true resurgence of artistically worthwhile but viscerally thrilling music from London.

"I met most of the artists and producers that contributed to this album on MySpace back in 2005," DELS remembers. We had a page called “Loners", where myself and the likes of Kwes, Micachu, Ghostpoet, Sampha, Coby Sey, Elan Tamara were all featured – way before anybody knew who we were. We always said that we'd do a proper album together eventually. Petals Have Fallen is probably the closest thing to that collaborative album happening to date’

Petals Have Fallen is a classic album from this astonishing musician, and his talented crop of friends.

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Photo: Eric Coleman

Residing in Los Angeles, California, Seven Davis Jr was raised on the classics – from Michael Jackson and Prince to Stevie Wonder and Aretha Franklin. His early self-released output, however, was more closely aligned to the city’s vibrant left-leaning electronic underground. The past 18 months have seen Seven skip from a retrospective EP via Kutmah’s IZWID imprint to 12"s with Must Have Records, Classic, Ten Thousand Yen (alongside Doc Daneeka) and Funkineven’s Apron Records on a Peven Everett vs. Sa-Ra vs. Derrick Carter flex.

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Photo: Eric Coleman

Residing in Los Angeles, California, Seven Davis Jr was raised on the classics – from Michael Jackson and Prince to Stevie Wonder and Aretha Franklin. His early self-released output, however, was more closely aligned to the city’s vibrant left-leaning electronic underground. The past 18 months have seen Seven skip from a retrospective EP via Kutmah’s IZWID imprint to 12"s with Must Have Records, Classic, Ten Thousand Yen (alongside Doc Daneeka) and Funkineven’s Apron Records on a Peven Everett vs. Sa-Ra vs. Derrick Carter flex.

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The young electronic musician known as Romare wears his inspiration on his sleeve – in fact, he takes his very name from it. Having studied African American Visual Culture at University, he had his ‘Sex Pistols moment’ when he came across the work of Romare Bearden. The African American’s collaged, cut’n’paste artworks inspired the young musician to apply a similar technique to music – an approach that was hugely fruitful, and remains central to his work today. After stints as a drummer and guitarist throughout school and university, he moved to Paris where he picked up the turntables and began mixing his own music with samples from second hand records. Romare the musician was born and the template for his debut record.

Underground hothouse Black Acre signed him in 2012, adding him to a formidable roster that included Loops Haunt, Fantastic Mr Fox, Blue Daisy and Dark Sky. The imprint put out his first release Meditations on Afrocentrism in March of that year. He began to play shows, making enough money to finance a move to London. Ensconced in the vast musical melting pot of the capital, he began work on his second EP Love Songs: Part One. Romare’s songs were included on compilations by heavyweights such as Bonobo and Tiga, as well as the Brownswood Recordings imprint.

His debut album, Projections, is named after a pivotal exhibition of his namesake and likewise explores various elements of American life. The album is in many ways a homage to the cycle of cultural appropriation in America. “Work Song” is a tribute to the classic American and namesake work song, whilst “Rainbow” is a celebration of disco. Projections expertly catalogues the movements of influence within music. The album doesn’t just sample music and vocal snatches, but also other sources such as documentaries and marries live instrumentation with the sampling palette.

With fierce support from by the likes of Benji B, Gilles Peterson and Huw Stephens, Romare’s music has, rightfully, already caused a stir. The stage is now set for his stunning debut album, Projections.

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The young electronic musician known as Romare wears his inspiration on his sleeve – in fact, he takes his very name from it. Having studied African American Visual Culture at University, he had his ‘Sex Pistols moment’ when he came across the work of Romare Bearden. The African American’s collaged, cut’n’paste artworks inspired the young musician to apply a similar technique to music – an approach that was hugely fruitful, and remains central to his work today. After stints as a drummer and guitarist throughout school and university, he moved to Paris where he picked up the turntables and began mixing his own music with samples from second hand records. Romare the musician was born and the template for his debut record.

Underground hothouse Black Acre signed him in 2012, adding him to a formidable roster that included Loops Haunt, Fantastic Mr Fox, Blue Daisy and Dark Sky. The imprint put out his first release Meditations on Afrocentrism in March of that year. He began to play shows, making enough money to finance a move to London. Ensconced in the vast musical melting pot of the capital, he began work on his second EP Love Songs: Part One. Romare’s songs were included on compilations by heavyweights such as Bonobo and Tiga, as well as the Brownswood Recordings imprint.

His debut album, Projections, is named after a pivotal exhibition of his namesake and likewise explores various elements of American life. The album is in many ways a homage to the cycle of cultural appropriation in America. “Work Song” is a tribute to the classic American and namesake work song, whilst “Rainbow” is a celebration of disco. Projections expertly catalogues the movements of influence within music. The album doesn’t just sample music and vocal snatches, but also other sources such as documentaries and marries live instrumentation with the sampling palette.

With fierce support from by the likes of Benji B, Gilles Peterson and Huw Stephens, Romare’s music has, rightfully, already caused a stir. The stage is now set for his stunning debut album, Projections.

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Richard Kylea Cowie (born 19 January 1979), better known by his stage name Wiley, is perhaps the most prolific British producer, rapper and recording artist to emerge in the last twenty years. He has made pioneering music in the fields of jungle, drum & bass and UK garage, but is best known as the originator and Godfather of Grime, the uniquely British take on rap music which roared out of east London in the early noughties. Since then he has straddled the mainstream and the underground, irritated and amazed people in equal measure and carved out a unique career path which he has more or less had to make up as he has  gone along.

Wiley's earliest recordings date back to 1997, when he featured on pirate radio rapping over jungle beats. In 2000, Wiley joined with "The Hit Squad" garage crew with school friends DJ Target and MC Maxwell D. They achieved some success on the UKG scene but then decided to combine with rival crew Pay As U Go to become a "super crew," containing the Ladies Hit Squad members plus DJ Slimzee and MC's Major Ace and Plague. God's Gift, Flow Dan and Riko joined soon after. In 2002 the collective achieved a top 40 hit with "Champagne Dance"

Soon after, the crew disintegrated due to individual members having differing ideas of the direction the crew should take. Wiley went on to form the Roll Deep collective, which included Dizzee Rascal and Tinchy Stryder as MCs. Wiley’s vision saw him stripping the generic melodies and sickly harmonies out of garage music and developing the drums and basslines. For a while there was no name for the genre he did more than anyone to create, but eventually the label "grime" was the one that stuck.  From 2001, Wiley produced a slew of instrumental singles on his WileyKat Record label, the best known being "Eskimo", "Avalanche" and "Ice Rink". The underground notoriety he achieved led to his being offered a recording deal with the legendary XL Recordings.

In 2004, Wiley released his debut album, 'Treddin' on Thin Ice' with his new label. Singles from the album included, "Wot Do U Call It?" which mocked the various names given to his music, and "Pies”, which showed his humorous side. Reviews such as in Pitchfork Media made comparisons between Wiley and his previous labelmate Dizzee Rascal, who had achieved success with Boy in Da Corner the previous year. Alexis Petridis of The Guardian noted the "comically polarised" fanbase Wiley had accrued; "At one extreme, its sonic experimentation has attracted the kind of people who run music blogs... [where] lengthy essays are posted on issues as the differentiation between Humean and Kantian views of motivation in the lyrics of Bonnie Prince Billy. At the other extreme, it is favoured by inner city teens who appear to communicate entirely in an impenetrable mix of street slang and patois."

During this period, Wiley occasionally referred to his music as "Eski", short for 'Eskibeat' – the name he initially gave to grime. He also released mixtapes under the name "Eskiboy". He explained his choice of name for his music and the continuing theme in his song and album titles such as 'Treddin' on Thin Ice', partly because he likes the wintertime, but mainly meaning cold in spirit. "Sometimes I just feel cold hearted. I felt cold at that time, towards my family, towards everyone. That's why I used those names.”

Many of Wiley's early vinyl releases, such as 'Eskimo', were released under the alias "Wiley Kat", this name was derived from a character in the cartoon Thundercats. However, the 'Kat' is never officially used by Wiley anymore, only being mentioned loosely in some of his songs.

In 2006, Wiley released his second album 'Da 2nd Phaze' on the Boy Better Know label. The album consists of 20 tracks that had been put together by Wiley from the past three years of work, including exclusive bonus tracks from God’s Gift, Alex Mills and More Fire Crew, the latter signaling the end of the Wiley-Lethal Bizzle feud.

This was followed in by Wiley's third album, 'Playtime is Over'  on Big Dada Records, which combined artistic control for Wiley with a full scale release on a recognised label. Wiley was thrilled at the opportunity to be allowed to make a grime record as he saw it, and he formed a relationship with the label that outlasted any other he’s had in the industry.

In May 2008, Wiley found mainstream chart success with the hit single, "Wearing My Rolex". The instrumentation (such as the slower, house style beat and lack of sub bass) caused some unrest within the Grime scene, as Wiley had publicly vowed that he would never leave grime music to break into the mainstream. In the same month, Wiley released his fourth album entitled Grime Wave, which was described by The Times as a "very pre-Rolex album. With its roots firmly based in the harsh, bass-heavy rhythms of the scene".  

This album was followed by See Clear Now, in October 2008 which included the mainstream hits "Wearing My Rolex", "Cash In My Pocket" and "Summertime". This album took Wiley in a mainstream direction. Despite its success, Wiley has disowned the album as he was "very angry" with the label, Asylum, about the production and also unhappy about his management at the time.

Now on his own label, Wiley went on to make another album, Race Against Time. This was released eight months after his previous album in June 2009, on Eskibeat Recordings and again he had much more creative control, if little time and few resources to organise the release effectively. The album includes the 2009 hit "Too Many Man", featuring Boy Better Know.

In 2010 Wiley released 11 Zip Files for free download on his Twitter page, containing over 200 tracks of old and unreleased music, including tracks from the forthcoming album 'The Elusive'. The following year, Wiley announced his return to the Big Dada label, and the release of '100% Publishing' . The album is perhaps best remembered for “Numbers In Action” and its innovative video, for which Wiley won a Video Music Award. 

Less than six months later, he released his third album with Big Dada, 'Evolve Or Be Extinct' , including skits set in taxi cabs and at immigration as well as lighthearted bangers like “Boom Blast” and “I’m Skanking” alongside harder material such as “Scar”. Soon after the record’s release Wiley began leaking grime freestyles over grime beats and releasing them for free via Twitter. This collection was released chronologically with the names "Step 1", "Step 2" and so on. After "Step 10", all of the freestyles were compiled and released as a mixtape titled It's All Fun and Games Till, Vol. 1. Alongside working on his "Step" freestyles, various other promo songs were released. Wiley carried on with his "Step" freestyles, releasing Vol. 2 of It's All Fun and Games Till.

In June 2012, Wiley released his summer single "Heatwave", featuring Ms D and produced by Rymez. On 5 August 2012, "Heatwave" peaked at number 1 on the UK Singles Chart, making this Wiley's first solo number 1, selling an impressive 114,000 copies. His next single, announced in late August, titled "Can You Hear Me" featuring Skepta, JME and Ms D, was released in October 2012. The song was renamed to "Can You Hear Me (Ayayaya)".

Alongside a series of harder-edged releases on Big Dada, Wiley devoted much of 2013 to the promotion of his Warner album, ‘The Ascent’, inclduing his infamous appearance at Glastonbury that summer, culminating in his all-time classic Tweet: “Fuck them and their farm.” On 11 October 2013, a petition was presented to Tower Hamlets' mayor Lutfur Rahman signed by over 2,000 Wiley fans, requesting that a monument to the artist be erected in Bow. On 19 October 2013, Wiley was awarded 'Best Male' at the MOBO Award's 18th Anniversary. 

Wiley remains one of the biggest characters and wildest talents in British music. Whether helping younger artists break through (Dizzee, Chipmunk, Tinchy), offloading hundreds of unreleashed tracks on Twitter, rowing with detractors or doling out private insights on the web – he is always in the studio. Ultimately a workaholic, he’s the kind of artist one can imagine making groundbreaking, avant-garde music well into his old age. A true maverick and an artist in the truest sense of the word, we’re lucky to have Wiley. We should make the most of it. But he probably won’t let us.

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Richard Kylea Cowie (born 19 January 1979), better known by his stage name Wiley, is perhaps the most prolific British producer, rapper and recording artist to emerge in the last twenty years. He has made pioneering music in the fields of jungle, drum & bass and UK garage, but is best known as the originator and Godfather of Grime, the uniquely British take on rap music which roared out of east London in the early noughties. Since then he has straddled the mainstream and the underground, irritated and amazed people in equal measure and carved out a unique career path which he has more or less had to make up as he has  gone along.

Wiley's earliest recordings date back to 1997, when he featured on pirate radio rapping over jungle beats. In 2000, Wiley joined with "The Hit Squad" garage crew with school friends DJ Target and MC Maxwell D. They achieved some success on the UKG scene but then decided to combine with rival crew Pay As U Go to become a "super crew," containing the Ladies Hit Squad members plus DJ Slimzee and MC's Major Ace and Plague. God's Gift, Flow Dan and Riko joined soon after. In 2002 the collective achieved a top 40 hit with "Champagne Dance"

Soon after, the crew disintegrated due to individual members having differing ideas of the direction the crew should take. Wiley went on to form the Roll Deep collective, which included Dizzee Rascal and Tinchy Stryder as MCs. Wiley’s vision saw him stripping the generic melodies and sickly harmonies out of garage music and developing the drums and basslines. For a while there was no name for the genre he did more than anyone to create, but eventually the label "grime" was the one that stuck.  From 2001, Wiley produced a slew of instrumental singles on his WileyKat Record label, the best known being "Eskimo", "Avalanche" and "Ice Rink". The underground notoriety he achieved led to his being offered a recording deal with the legendary XL Recordings.

In 2004, Wiley released his debut album, 'Treddin' on Thin Ice' with his new label. Singles from the album included, "Wot Do U Call It?" which mocked the various names given to his music, and "Pies”, which showed his humorous side. Reviews such as in Pitchfork Media made comparisons between Wiley and his previous labelmate Dizzee Rascal, who had achieved success with Boy in Da Corner the previous year. Alexis Petridis of The Guardian noted the "comically polarised" fanbase Wiley had accrued; "At one extreme, its sonic experimentation has attracted the kind of people who run music blogs... [where] lengthy essays are posted on issues as the differentiation between Humean and Kantian views of motivation in the lyrics of Bonnie Prince Billy. At the other extreme, it is favoured by inner city teens who appear to communicate entirely in an impenetrable mix of street slang and patois."

During this period, Wiley occasionally referred to his music as "Eski", short for 'Eskibeat' – the name he initially gave to grime. He also released mixtapes under the name "Eskiboy". He explained his choice of name for his music and the continuing theme in his song and album titles such as 'Treddin' on Thin Ice', partly because he likes the wintertime, but mainly meaning cold in spirit. "Sometimes I just feel cold hearted. I felt cold at that time, towards my family, towards everyone. That's why I used those names.”

Many of Wiley's early vinyl releases, such as 'Eskimo', were released under the alias "Wiley Kat", this name was derived from a character in the cartoon Thundercats. However, the 'Kat' is never officially used by Wiley anymore, only being mentioned loosely in some of his songs.

In 2006, Wiley released his second album 'Da 2nd Phaze' on the Boy Better Know label. The album consists of 20 tracks that had been put together by Wiley from the past three years of work, including exclusive bonus tracks from God’s Gift, Alex Mills and More Fire Crew, the latter signaling the end of the Wiley-Lethal Bizzle feud.

This was followed in by Wiley's third album, 'Playtime is Over'  on Big Dada Records, which combined artistic control for Wiley with a full scale release on a recognised label. Wiley was thrilled at the opportunity to be allowed to make a grime record as he saw it, and he formed a relationship with the label that outlasted any other he’s had in the industry.

In May 2008, Wiley found mainstream chart success with the hit single, "Wearing My Rolex". The instrumentation (such as the slower, house style beat and lack of sub bass) caused some unrest within the Grime scene, as Wiley had publicly vowed that he would never leave grime music to break into the mainstream. In the same month, Wiley released his fourth album entitled Grime Wave, which was described by The Times as a "very pre-Rolex album. With its roots firmly based in the harsh, bass-heavy rhythms of the scene".  

This album was followed by See Clear Now, in October 2008 which included the mainstream hits "Wearing My Rolex", "Cash In My Pocket" and "Summertime". This album took Wiley in a mainstream direction. Despite its success, Wiley has disowned the album as he was "very angry" with the label, Asylum, about the production and also unhappy about his management at the time.

Now on his own label, Wiley went on to make another album, Race Against Time. This was released eight months after his previous album in June 2009, on Eskibeat Recordings and again he had much more creative control, if little time and few resources to organise the release effectively. The album includes the 2009 hit "Too Many Man", featuring Boy Better Know.

In 2010 Wiley released 11 Zip Files for free download on his Twitter page, containing over 200 tracks of old and unreleased music, including tracks from the forthcoming album 'The Elusive'. The following year, Wiley announced his return to the Big Dada label, and the release of '100% Publishing' . The album is perhaps best remembered for “Numbers In Action” and its innovative video, for which Wiley won a Video Music Award. 

Less than six months later, he released his third album with Big Dada, 'Evolve Or Be Extinct' , including skits set in taxi cabs and at immigration as well as lighthearted bangers like “Boom Blast” and “I’m Skanking” alongside harder material such as “Scar”. Soon after the record’s release Wiley began leaking grime freestyles over grime beats and releasing them for free via Twitter. This collection was released chronologically with the names "Step 1", "Step 2" and so on. After "Step 10", all of the freestyles were compiled and released as a mixtape titled It's All Fun and Games Till, Vol. 1. Alongside working on his "Step" freestyles, various other promo songs were released. Wiley carried on with his "Step" freestyles, releasing Vol. 2 of It's All Fun and Games Till.

In June 2012, Wiley released his summer single "Heatwave", featuring Ms D and produced by Rymez. On 5 August 2012, "Heatwave" peaked at number 1 on the UK Singles Chart, making this Wiley's first solo number 1, selling an impressive 114,000 copies. His next single, announced in late August, titled "Can You Hear Me" featuring Skepta, JME and Ms D, was released in October 2012. The song was renamed to "Can You Hear Me (Ayayaya)".

Alongside a series of harder-edged releases on Big Dada, Wiley devoted much of 2013 to the promotion of his Warner album, ‘The Ascent’, inclduing his infamous appearance at Glastonbury that summer, culminating in his all-time classic Tweet: “Fuck them and their farm.” On 11 October 2013, a petition was presented to Tower Hamlets' mayor Lutfur Rahman signed by over 2,000 Wiley fans, requesting that a monument to the artist be erected in Bow. On 19 October 2013, Wiley was awarded 'Best Male' at the MOBO Award's 18th Anniversary. 

Wiley remains one of the biggest characters and wildest talents in British music. Whether helping younger artists break through (Dizzee, Chipmunk, Tinchy), offloading hundreds of unreleashed tracks on Twitter, rowing with detractors or doling out private insights on the web – he is always in the studio. Ultimately a workaholic, he’s the kind of artist one can imagine making groundbreaking, avant-garde music well into his old age. A true maverick and an artist in the truest sense of the word, we’re lucky to have Wiley. We should make the most of it. But he probably won’t let us.

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Fin Greenall, who is the voice and heart behind Fink, often gets mistaken for other people. 

At the BMI Awards in the US, a ‘roomful of gangstas and playas’ were convinced the Cornwall-born, Bristol-raised Englishman was a lawyer, and not a songwriter picking up an ‘American Urban’ gong – one of three BMIs he received for his work with John Legend on the soul singer’s Evolver album.

In Berlin, clubbing capital of the world, they think he helps run a small minimal techno label. In certain London circles he’s known as the hardworking insider whose past roles at DefJam, Sony Music, Talkin’ Loud, and Source saw him work with a range of artists longer than the horizon. At the BBC, they imagine Fink as perhaps the only musician who has played both the Electric Proms and the actual Proms (was that really the same guy leading a 120-piece orchestra at the Royal Albert Hall in an ‘immense’ cover of Roy Ayers’ Everybody Loves The Sunshine?). 

In record company circles, he’s the producer who worked on the first demos by Amy Winehouse and the writer who’s been crafting hooks for Professor Green. In big-room booths around the world, he’s the internationally-renowned DJ and Ninja Tune stalwart who finally hung up his Sennheisers with a valedictory set at London’s Fabric in 2003. ‘My skillset just seemed so old compared to these guys that could DJ for six hours without one high-hat out of place using Ableton or something,’ he notes admiringly.

Who is Fin Greenall? All of the above. 

Yes, the now-Brighton-based musician acknowledges, he has done – does do – all of those things. ‘But none of that is as important as how I feel when I write songs like "Fear is Like Fire" and "Perfect Darkness". The Fink thing is my main thing.’

As a kid, the one thing of his dad’s that Fin Greenall wasn’t allowed to touch was the old Martin acoustic guitar. ‘It was his one possession where he said, “everything in this house is owned by everybody – apart from that.”’ But with age – and the burgeoning of his son’s skills as a player – came a relaxation of the exclusion zone: Greenall plays the Martin on the punchy, Jeff Buckley-covering-Radiohead-esque "Fear Is Like Fire". It’s sure to become a live stand-out on Fink’s upcoming, 18-month-long world tour. ‘It’s all about trying to look at fear and be optimistic – you can be really negative or fucking embrace it and use it. 

‘The great thing about growing up in a house where music is a big factor,’ he continues, ‘was the fact that music being part of your life was a perfectly natural thing.’ 

Music, it seems, became more than that: it was Greenall’s life. He hoovered up the sounds he heard on John Peel: ‘The Cure, The Smiths, The Orb, African music, Japanese hardcore’. He embraced skateboarding, the music and the fashion – ‘it was an awesome way to grow your own culture’. At university in Leeds, electronic and dance music became everything. 

‘It was definitely about wanting to be part of a revolution that I could call my own,’ he recalls. ‘A couple of friends and I clubbed together our student loans and bought equipment to make ambient techno – we were really inspired by Aphex Twin and The Orb and Moby. We were amazed at how fucking easy it was to make ambient techno. It wasn’t easy to make good ambient techno,’ he laughs. ‘But it was easy enough to make techno good enough to get us signed after six months of mucking around at uni.’ 

The young techno warrior was messianic. 

‘I thought the song was dead, the chorus was dead, playing drums and guitar and bass was so old-school and outdated and why would you want to do that? Dylan did that 50 years ago! We should be part of this new revolution, instrumentalism, acid house, rave culture, techno – this stuff is a brave new avant-garde frontier and you should be involved.’ 

His ardour and his skills saw Greenall become part of the Ninja Tune family – first signed on the back of a cassette-tape demo - as artist, DJ, writer, producer, and remixer. 

‘Brilliant times,’ he sighs nostalgically. ‘Sometimes you’d just have to pinch yourself. Then, other times, you wake up in Bratislava on a Tuesday morning and you’re reminded that there is hard work to all of this.’ All that crate-digging wasn’t all it’s cracked up to be either: ‘You can’t be shit!’ Greenall grins. ‘And because of the community that Ninja has worldwide, if you are shit everybody knows about it the next day. Eight years of DJing have given me an obscenely huge record collection. I just cleared out the breaks section – four crates of twelves that were total pony!’ 

So the wheels of steel started to fall off. 

‘It wasn’t until I’d run that right the way through to its natural conclusion – I’m an international DJ on the biggest DJ label in the world – that I thought: I’m kinda over it. And it was actually working with a young artist straight out of school called Amy Winehouse that inspired me to go, “wow, songs are great! Now I get how difficult it is, and how much talent there is involved in this. It’s more of a challenge than clubbing.”’ 

Greenall melted down his turntables and recast them as a guitar and a stool. Metaphorically speaking. His parents were pleased. ‘My career only made sense to them when I picked up a guitar and started to sing,’ he says. ‘All of a sudden I was doing music, I wasn’t just mucking around. But in my rave days, DJing techno and breaks, they didn’t get that at all. That’s probably why I did it in the first place. 

‘But I realised: if your music had songs in it, it had a much greater reach. Not in business terms, but if a singer of, say, Amy’s calibre sings over this beat, it becomes so much bigger than just a beat. I can’t get rid of my clubbing past, not that I’d want to. But the linear nature of some of my music is definitely because of all those years spent clubbing and DJing, when a very simple idea can make the best club record. And it’s the same with songs – I’m after a really simple riff or really simple lyric or melody. And it’s about keeping that beautiful moment going for as long as you can.’

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Fin Greenall, who is the voice and heart behind Fink, often gets mistaken for other people. 

At the BMI Awards in the US, a ‘roomful of gangstas and playas’ were convinced the Cornwall-born, Bristol-raised Englishman was a lawyer, and not a songwriter picking up an ‘American Urban’ gong – one of three BMIs he received for his work with John Legend on the soul singer’s Evolver album.

In Berlin, clubbing capital of the world, they think he helps run a small minimal techno label. In certain London circles he’s known as the hardworking insider whose past roles at DefJam, Sony Music, Talkin’ Loud, and Source saw him work with a range of artists longer than the horizon. At the BBC, they imagine Fink as perhaps the only musician who has played both the Electric Proms and the actual Proms (was that really the same guy leading a 120-piece orchestra at the Royal Albert Hall in an ‘immense’ cover of Roy Ayers’ Everybody Loves The Sunshine?). 

In record company circles, he’s the producer who worked on the first demos by Amy Winehouse and the writer who’s been crafting hooks for Professor Green. In big-room booths around the world, he’s the internationally-renowned DJ and Ninja Tune stalwart who finally hung up his Sennheisers with a valedictory set at London’s Fabric in 2003. ‘My skillset just seemed so old compared to these guys that could DJ for six hours without one high-hat out of place using Ableton or something,’ he notes admiringly.

Who is Fin Greenall? All of the above. 

Yes, the now-Brighton-based musician acknowledges, he has done – does do – all of those things. ‘But none of that is as important as how I feel when I write songs like "Fear is Like Fire" and "Perfect Darkness". The Fink thing is my main thing.’

As a kid, the one thing of his dad’s that Fin Greenall wasn’t allowed to touch was the old Martin acoustic guitar. ‘It was his one possession where he said, “everything in this house is owned by everybody – apart from that.”’ But with age – and the burgeoning of his son’s skills as a player – came a relaxation of the exclusion zone: Greenall plays the Martin on the punchy, Jeff Buckley-covering-Radiohead-esque "Fear Is Like Fire". It’s sure to become a live stand-out on Fink’s upcoming, 18-month-long world tour. ‘It’s all about trying to look at fear and be optimistic – you can be really negative or fucking embrace it and use it. 

‘The great thing about growing up in a house where music is a big factor,’ he continues, ‘was the fact that music being part of your life was a perfectly natural thing.’ 

Music, it seems, became more than that: it was Greenall’s life. He hoovered up the sounds he heard on John Peel: ‘The Cure, The Smiths, The Orb, African music, Japanese hardcore’. He embraced skateboarding, the music and the fashion – ‘it was an awesome way to grow your own culture’. At university in Leeds, electronic and dance music became everything. 

‘It was definitely about wanting to be part of a revolution that I could call my own,’ he recalls. ‘A couple of friends and I clubbed together our student loans and bought equipment to make ambient techno – we were really inspired by Aphex Twin and The Orb and Moby. We were amazed at how fucking easy it was to make ambient techno. It wasn’t easy to make good ambient techno,’ he laughs. ‘But it was easy enough to make techno good enough to get us signed after six months of mucking around at uni.’ 

The young techno warrior was messianic. 

‘I thought the song was dead, the chorus was dead, playing drums and guitar and bass was so old-school and outdated and why would you want to do that? Dylan did that 50 years ago! We should be part of this new revolution, instrumentalism, acid house, rave culture, techno – this stuff is a brave new avant-garde frontier and you should be involved.’ 

His ardour and his skills saw Greenall become part of the Ninja Tune family – first signed on the back of a cassette-tape demo - as artist, DJ, writer, producer, and remixer. 

‘Brilliant times,’ he sighs nostalgically. ‘Sometimes you’d just have to pinch yourself. Then, other times, you wake up in Bratislava on a Tuesday morning and you’re reminded that there is hard work to all of this.’ All that crate-digging wasn’t all it’s cracked up to be either: ‘You can’t be shit!’ Greenall grins. ‘And because of the community that Ninja has worldwide, if you are shit everybody knows about it the next day. Eight years of DJing have given me an obscenely huge record collection. I just cleared out the breaks section – four crates of twelves that were total pony!’ 

So the wheels of steel started to fall off. 

‘It wasn’t until I’d run that right the way through to its natural conclusion – I’m an international DJ on the biggest DJ label in the world – that I thought: I’m kinda over it. And it was actually working with a young artist straight out of school called Amy Winehouse that inspired me to go, “wow, songs are great! Now I get how difficult it is, and how much talent there is involved in this. It’s more of a challenge than clubbing.”’ 

Greenall melted down his turntables and recast them as a guitar and a stool. Metaphorically speaking. His parents were pleased. ‘My career only made sense to them when I picked up a guitar and started to sing,’ he says. ‘All of a sudden I was doing music, I wasn’t just mucking around. But in my rave days, DJing techno and breaks, they didn’t get that at all. That’s probably why I did it in the first place. 

‘But I realised: if your music had songs in it, it had a much greater reach. Not in business terms, but if a singer of, say, Amy’s calibre sings over this beat, it becomes so much bigger than just a beat. I can’t get rid of my clubbing past, not that I’d want to. But the linear nature of some of my music is definitely because of all those years spent clubbing and DJing, when a very simple idea can make the best club record. And it’s the same with songs – I’m after a really simple riff or really simple lyric or melody. And it’s about keeping that beautiful moment going for as long as you can.’

[links_clean] =>

Fink Website

Facebook
Twitter
Soundcloud

[counter_player] => [counter_biog] => ) ) ) [8] => Array ( [Event] => Array ( [id] => 13624 [date] => 2015-02-01 [artist] => Fink [city] => Istanbul [state] => [country] => TU [venue] => Babylon Club [promoter] => [description] => [ticket_url] => http://www.biletix.com/etkinlik/SBA04/TURKIYE/tr [image_upload_id] => 19785 [created] => 2014-12-04 15:55:50 [modified] => 2014-12-04 15:55:50 [year_slug] => 2015 [month_slug] => feb [day_slug] => 1 [slug] => fink-istanbul-babylon-club [description_clean] => [products_count] => 0 [hidden] => 0 [soldout] => 0 ) [Image] => Array ( [id] => 19785 [media_type] => image [artist] => Fink [title] => Fink Artist Shot 2014 [credits] => [buy_link] => [filename] => images/fink/Fink-TommyNLance-2014-2-1.jpg [checksum] => f33ac1c81dca48ea7011bb0061a2d804 [mime_type] => image/jpeg [size] => 221775 [external_url] => http://media.ninjatune.net/images/fink/Fink-TommyNLance-2014-2-1.jpg [image_upload_id] => [first_track_id] => [first_release_id] => [listed] => 0 [active] => 1 [processed] => 1 [artist_slug] => fink [slug] => fink-artist-shot-2014 [created] => 2014-08-11 14:07:33 [modified] => 2014-08-11 14:10:27 [embed] => ) [Country] => Array ( [id] => 176 [name] => Turkey [longname] => Turkey [numcode] => 792 [iso] => TU [iso3] => TUR [currency] => GBP [active] => 1 [parent_id] => 160 [lft] => 349 [rght] => 350 [level] => 2 ) [Product] => Array ( ) [Artist] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => 4 [name] => Fink [description] =>

Fin Greenall, who is the voice and heart behind Fink, often gets mistaken for other people. 

At the BMI Awards in the US, a ‘roomful of gangstas and playas’ were convinced the Cornwall-born, Bristol-raised Englishman was a lawyer, and not a songwriter picking up an ‘American Urban’ gong – one of three BMIs he received for his work with John Legend on the soul singer’s Evolver album.

In Berlin, clubbing capital of the world, they think he helps run a small minimal techno label. In certain London circles he’s known as the hardworking insider whose past roles at DefJam, Sony Music, Talkin’ Loud, and Source saw him work with a range of artists longer than the horizon. At the BBC, they imagine Fink as perhaps the only musician who has played both the Electric Proms and the actual Proms (was that really the same guy leading a 120-piece orchestra at the Royal Albert Hall in an ‘immense’ cover of Roy Ayers’ Everybody Loves The Sunshine?). 

In record company circles, he’s the producer who worked on the first demos by Amy Winehouse and the writer who’s been crafting hooks for Professor Green. In big-room booths around the world, he’s the internationally-renowned DJ and Ninja Tune stalwart who finally hung up his Sennheisers with a valedictory set at London’s Fabric in 2003. ‘My skillset just seemed so old compared to these guys that could DJ for six hours without one high-hat out of place using Ableton or something,’ he notes admiringly.

Who is Fin Greenall? All of the above. 

Yes, the now-Brighton-based musician acknowledges, he has done – does do – all of those things. ‘But none of that is as important as how I feel when I write songs like "Fear is Like Fire" and "Perfect Darkness". The Fink thing is my main thing.’

As a kid, the one thing of his dad’s that Fin Greenall wasn’t allowed to touch was the old Martin acoustic guitar. ‘It was his one possession where he said, “everything in this house is owned by everybody – apart from that.”’ But with age – and the burgeoning of his son’s skills as a player – came a relaxation of the exclusion zone: Greenall plays the Martin on the punchy, Jeff Buckley-covering-Radiohead-esque "Fear Is Like Fire". It’s sure to become a live stand-out on Fink’s upcoming, 18-month-long world tour. ‘It’s all about trying to look at fear and be optimistic – you can be really negative or fucking embrace it and use it. 

‘The great thing about growing up in a house where music is a big factor,’ he continues, ‘was the fact that music being part of your life was a perfectly natural thing.’ 

Music, it seems, became more than that: it was Greenall’s life. He hoovered up the sounds he heard on John Peel: ‘The Cure, The Smiths, The Orb, African music, Japanese hardcore’. He embraced skateboarding, the music and the fashion – ‘it was an awesome way to grow your own culture’. At university in Leeds, electronic and dance music became everything. 

‘It was definitely about wanting to be part of a revolution that I could call my own,’ he recalls. ‘A couple of friends and I clubbed together our student loans and bought equipment to make ambient techno – we were really inspired by Aphex Twin and The Orb and Moby. We were amazed at how fucking easy it was to make ambient techno. It wasn’t easy to make good ambient techno,’ he laughs. ‘But it was easy enough to make techno good enough to get us signed after six months of mucking around at uni.’ 

The young techno warrior was messianic. 

‘I thought the song was dead, the chorus was dead, playing drums and guitar and bass was so old-school and outdated and why would you want to do that? Dylan did that 50 years ago! We should be part of this new revolution, instrumentalism, acid house, rave culture, techno – this stuff is a brave new avant-garde frontier and you should be involved.’ 

His ardour and his skills saw Greenall become part of the Ninja Tune family – first signed on the back of a cassette-tape demo - as artist, DJ, writer, producer, and remixer. 

‘Brilliant times,’ he sighs nostalgically. ‘Sometimes you’d just have to pinch yourself. Then, other times, you wake up in Bratislava on a Tuesday morning and you’re reminded that there is hard work to all of this.’ All that crate-digging wasn’t all it’s cracked up to be either: ‘You can’t be shit!’ Greenall grins. ‘And because of the community that Ninja has worldwide, if you are shit everybody knows about it the next day. Eight years of DJing have given me an obscenely huge record collection. I just cleared out the breaks section – four crates of twelves that were total pony!’ 

So the wheels of steel started to fall off. 

‘It wasn’t until I’d run that right the way through to its natural conclusion – I’m an international DJ on the biggest DJ label in the world – that I thought: I’m kinda over it. And it was actually working with a young artist straight out of school called Amy Winehouse that inspired me to go, “wow, songs are great! Now I get how difficult it is, and how much talent there is involved in this. It’s more of a challenge than clubbing.”’ 

Greenall melted down his turntables and recast them as a guitar and a stool. Metaphorically speaking. His parents were pleased. ‘My career only made sense to them when I picked up a guitar and started to sing,’ he says. ‘All of a sudden I was doing music, I wasn’t just mucking around. But in my rave days, DJing techno and breaks, they didn’t get that at all. That’s probably why I did it in the first place. 

‘But I realised: if your music had songs in it, it had a much greater reach. Not in business terms, but if a singer of, say, Amy’s calibre sings over this beat, it becomes so much bigger than just a beat. I can’t get rid of my clubbing past, not that I’d want to. But the linear nature of some of my music is definitely because of all those years spent clubbing and DJing, when a very simple idea can make the best club record. And it’s the same with songs – I’m after a really simple riff or really simple lyric or melody. And it’s about keeping that beautiful moment going for as long as you can.’

[links] =>

Fink Website

Facebook
Twitter
Soundcloud

[image_upload_id] => 19785 [label_id] => 13 [twitter_username] => Finkmusic [instagram_id] => [instagram_username] => [link] => [listed] => 1 [sortname] => Fink [created] => 2010-07-17 22:15:58 [modified] => 2014-08-11 14:09:15 [slug] => fink [fuga_id] => [description_clean] =>

Fin Greenall, who is the voice and heart behind Fink, often gets mistaken for other people. 

At the BMI Awards in the US, a ‘roomful of gangstas and playas’ were convinced the Cornwall-born, Bristol-raised Englishman was a lawyer, and not a songwriter picking up an ‘American Urban’ gong – one of three BMIs he received for his work with John Legend on the soul singer’s Evolver album.

In Berlin, clubbing capital of the world, they think he helps run a small minimal techno label. In certain London circles he’s known as the hardworking insider whose past roles at DefJam, Sony Music, Talkin’ Loud, and Source saw him work with a range of artists longer than the horizon. At the BBC, they imagine Fink as perhaps the only musician who has played both the Electric Proms and the actual Proms (was that really the same guy leading a 120-piece orchestra at the Royal Albert Hall in an ‘immense’ cover of Roy Ayers’ Everybody Loves The Sunshine?). 

In record company circles, he’s the producer who worked on the first demos by Amy Winehouse and the writer who’s been crafting hooks for Professor Green. In big-room booths around the world, he’s the internationally-renowned DJ and Ninja Tune stalwart who finally hung up his Sennheisers with a valedictory set at London’s Fabric in 2003. ‘My skillset just seemed so old compared to these guys that could DJ for six hours without one high-hat out of place using Ableton or something,’ he notes admiringly.

Who is Fin Greenall? All of the above. 

Yes, the now-Brighton-based musician acknowledges, he has done – does do – all of those things. ‘But none of that is as important as how I feel when I write songs like "Fear is Like Fire" and "Perfect Darkness". The Fink thing is my main thing.’

As a kid, the one thing of his dad’s that Fin Greenall wasn’t allowed to touch was the old Martin acoustic guitar. ‘It was his one possession where he said, “everything in this house is owned by everybody – apart from that.”’ But with age – and the burgeoning of his son’s skills as a player – came a relaxation of the exclusion zone: Greenall plays the Martin on the punchy, Jeff Buckley-covering-Radiohead-esque "Fear Is Like Fire". It’s sure to become a live stand-out on Fink’s upcoming, 18-month-long world tour. ‘It’s all about trying to look at fear and be optimistic – you can be really negative or fucking embrace it and use it. 

‘The great thing about growing up in a house where music is a big factor,’ he continues, ‘was the fact that music being part of your life was a perfectly natural thing.’ 

Music, it seems, became more than that: it was Greenall’s life. He hoovered up the sounds he heard on John Peel: ‘The Cure, The Smiths, The Orb, African music, Japanese hardcore’. He embraced skateboarding, the music and the fashion – ‘it was an awesome way to grow your own culture’. At university in Leeds, electronic and dance music became everything. 

‘It was definitely about wanting to be part of a revolution that I could call my own,’ he recalls. ‘A couple of friends and I clubbed together our student loans and bought equipment to make ambient techno – we were really inspired by Aphex Twin and The Orb and Moby. We were amazed at how fucking easy it was to make ambient techno. It wasn’t easy to make good ambient techno,’ he laughs. ‘But it was easy enough to make techno good enough to get us signed after six months of mucking around at uni.’ 

The young techno warrior was messianic. 

‘I thought the song was dead, the chorus was dead, playing drums and guitar and bass was so old-school and outdated and why would you want to do that? Dylan did that 50 years ago! We should be part of this new revolution, instrumentalism, acid house, rave culture, techno – this stuff is a brave new avant-garde frontier and you should be involved.’ 

His ardour and his skills saw Greenall become part of the Ninja Tune family – first signed on the back of a cassette-tape demo - as artist, DJ, writer, producer, and remixer. 

‘Brilliant times,’ he sighs nostalgically. ‘Sometimes you’d just have to pinch yourself. Then, other times, you wake up in Bratislava on a Tuesday morning and you’re reminded that there is hard work to all of this.’ All that crate-digging wasn’t all it’s cracked up to be either: ‘You can’t be shit!’ Greenall grins. ‘And because of the community that Ninja has worldwide, if you are shit everybody knows about it the next day. Eight years of DJing have given me an obscenely huge record collection. I just cleared out the breaks section – four crates of twelves that were total pony!’ 

So the wheels of steel started to fall off. 

‘It wasn’t until I’d run that right the way through to its natural conclusion – I’m an international DJ on the biggest DJ label in the world – that I thought: I’m kinda over it. And it was actually working with a young artist straight out of school called Amy Winehouse that inspired me to go, “wow, songs are great! Now I get how difficult it is, and how much talent there is involved in this. It’s more of a challenge than clubbing.”’ 

Greenall melted down his turntables and recast them as a guitar and a stool. Metaphorically speaking. His parents were pleased. ‘My career only made sense to them when I picked up a guitar and started to sing,’ he says. ‘All of a sudden I was doing music, I wasn’t just mucking around. But in my rave days, DJing techno and breaks, they didn’t get that at all. That’s probably why I did it in the first place. 

‘But I realised: if your music had songs in it, it had a much greater reach. Not in business terms, but if a singer of, say, Amy’s calibre sings over this beat, it becomes so much bigger than just a beat. I can’t get rid of my clubbing past, not that I’d want to. But the linear nature of some of my music is definitely because of all those years spent clubbing and DJing, when a very simple idea can make the best club record. And it’s the same with songs – I’m after a really simple riff or really simple lyric or melody. And it’s about keeping that beautiful moment going for as long as you can.’

[links_clean] =>

Fink Website

Facebook
Twitter
Soundcloud

[counter_player] => [counter_biog] => ) ) ) [9] => Array ( [Event] => Array ( [id] => 13626 [date] => 2015-02-02 [artist] => Fink [city] => Sofia [state] => [country] => BG [venue] => Sofia Live Club [promoter] => [description] => [ticket_url] => http://www.finkworld.co.uk/tickets/events/2-feb-15-fink-sofia-live-club [image_upload_id] => 19785 [created] => 2014-12-04 15:57:02 [modified] => 2014-12-04 15:57:02 [year_slug] => 2015 [month_slug] => feb [day_slug] => 2 [slug] => fink-sofia-sofia-live-club [description_clean] => [products_count] => 0 [hidden] => 0 [soldout] => 0 ) [Image] => Array ( [id] => 19785 [media_type] => image [artist] => Fink [title] => Fink Artist Shot 2014 [credits] => [buy_link] => [filename] => images/fink/Fink-TommyNLance-2014-2-1.jpg [checksum] => f33ac1c81dca48ea7011bb0061a2d804 [mime_type] => image/jpeg [size] => 221775 [external_url] => http://media.ninjatune.net/images/fink/Fink-TommyNLance-2014-2-1.jpg [image_upload_id] => [first_track_id] => [first_release_id] => [listed] => 0 [active] => 1 [processed] => 1 [artist_slug] => fink [slug] => fink-artist-shot-2014 [created] => 2014-08-11 14:07:33 [modified] => 2014-08-11 14:10:27 [embed] => ) [Country] => Array ( [id] => 182 [name] => Bulgaria [longname] => Bulgaria [numcode] => 100 [iso] => BG [iso3] => BGR [currency] => GBP [active] => 1 [parent_id] => 180 [lft] => 361 [rght] => 362 [level] => 2 ) [Product] => Array ( ) [Artist] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => 4 [name] => Fink [description] =>

Fin Greenall, who is the voice and heart behind Fink, often gets mistaken for other people. 

At the BMI Awards in the US, a ‘roomful of gangstas and playas’ were convinced the Cornwall-born, Bristol-raised Englishman was a lawyer, and not a songwriter picking up an ‘American Urban’ gong – one of three BMIs he received for his work with John Legend on the soul singer’s Evolver album.

In Berlin, clubbing capital of the world, they think he helps run a small minimal techno label. In certain London circles he’s known as the hardworking insider whose past roles at DefJam, Sony Music, Talkin’ Loud, and Source saw him work with a range of artists longer than the horizon. At the BBC, they imagine Fink as perhaps the only musician who has played both the Electric Proms and the actual Proms (was that really the same guy leading a 120-piece orchestra at the Royal Albert Hall in an ‘immense’ cover of Roy Ayers’ Everybody Loves The Sunshine?). 

In record company circles, he’s the producer who worked on the first demos by Amy Winehouse and the writer who’s been crafting hooks for Professor Green. In big-room booths around the world, he’s the internationally-renowned DJ and Ninja Tune stalwart who finally hung up his Sennheisers with a valedictory set at London’s Fabric in 2003. ‘My skillset just seemed so old compared to these guys that could DJ for six hours without one high-hat out of place using Ableton or something,’ he notes admiringly.

Who is Fin Greenall? All of the above. 

Yes, the now-Brighton-based musician acknowledges, he has done – does do – all of those things. ‘But none of that is as important as how I feel when I write songs like "Fear is Like Fire" and "Perfect Darkness". The Fink thing is my main thing.’

As a kid, the one thing of his dad’s that Fin Greenall wasn’t allowed to touch was the old Martin acoustic guitar. ‘It was his one possession where he said, “everything in this house is owned by everybody – apart from that.”’ But with age – and the burgeoning of his son’s skills as a player – came a relaxation of the exclusion zone: Greenall plays the Martin on the punchy, Jeff Buckley-covering-Radiohead-esque "Fear Is Like Fire". It’s sure to become a live stand-out on Fink’s upcoming, 18-month-long world tour. ‘It’s all about trying to look at fear and be optimistic – you can be really negative or fucking embrace it and use it. 

‘The great thing about growing up in a house where music is a big factor,’ he continues, ‘was the fact that music being part of your life was a perfectly natural thing.’ 

Music, it seems, became more than that: it was Greenall’s life. He hoovered up the sounds he heard on John Peel: ‘The Cure, The Smiths, The Orb, African music, Japanese hardcore’. He embraced skateboarding, the music and the fashion – ‘it was an awesome way to grow your own culture’. At university in Leeds, electronic and dance music became everything. 

‘It was definitely about wanting to be part of a revolution that I could call my own,’ he recalls. ‘A couple of friends and I clubbed together our student loans and bought equipment to make ambient techno – we were really inspired by Aphex Twin and The Orb and Moby. We were amazed at how fucking easy it was to make ambient techno. It wasn’t easy to make good ambient techno,’ he laughs. ‘But it was easy enough to make techno good enough to get us signed after six months of mucking around at uni.’ 

The young techno warrior was messianic. 

‘I thought the song was dead, the chorus was dead, playing drums and guitar and bass was so old-school and outdated and why would you want to do that? Dylan did that 50 years ago! We should be part of this new revolution, instrumentalism, acid house, rave culture, techno – this stuff is a brave new avant-garde frontier and you should be involved.’ 

His ardour and his skills saw Greenall become part of the Ninja Tune family – first signed on the back of a cassette-tape demo - as artist, DJ, writer, producer, and remixer. 

‘Brilliant times,’ he sighs nostalgically. ‘Sometimes you’d just have to pinch yourself. Then, other times, you wake up in Bratislava on a Tuesday morning and you’re reminded that there is hard work to all of this.’ All that crate-digging wasn’t all it’s cracked up to be either: ‘You can’t be shit!’ Greenall grins. ‘And because of the community that Ninja has worldwide, if you are shit everybody knows about it the next day. Eight years of DJing have given me an obscenely huge record collection. I just cleared out the breaks section – four crates of twelves that were total pony!’ 

So the wheels of steel started to fall off. 

‘It wasn’t until I’d run that right the way through to its natural conclusion – I’m an international DJ on the biggest DJ label in the world – that I thought: I’m kinda over it. And it was actually working with a young artist straight out of school called Amy Winehouse that inspired me to go, “wow, songs are great! Now I get how difficult it is, and how much talent there is involved in this. It’s more of a challenge than clubbing.”’ 

Greenall melted down his turntables and recast them as a guitar and a stool. Metaphorically speaking. His parents were pleased. ‘My career only made sense to them when I picked up a guitar and started to sing,’ he says. ‘All of a sudden I was doing music, I wasn’t just mucking around. But in my rave days, DJing techno and breaks, they didn’t get that at all. That’s probably why I did it in the first place. 

‘But I realised: if your music had songs in it, it had a much greater reach. Not in business terms, but if a singer of, say, Amy’s calibre sings over this beat, it becomes so much bigger than just a beat. I can’t get rid of my clubbing past, not that I’d want to. But the linear nature of some of my music is definitely because of all those years spent clubbing and DJing, when a very simple idea can make the best club record. And it’s the same with songs – I’m after a really simple riff or really simple lyric or melody. And it’s about keeping that beautiful moment going for as long as you can.’

[links] =>

Fink Website

Facebook
Twitter
Soundcloud

[image_upload_id] => 19785 [label_id] => 13 [twitter_username] => Finkmusic [instagram_id] => [instagram_username] => [link] => [listed] => 1 [sortname] => Fink [created] => 2010-07-17 22:15:58 [modified] => 2014-08-11 14:09:15 [slug] => fink [fuga_id] => [description_clean] =>

Fin Greenall, who is the voice and heart behind Fink, often gets mistaken for other people. 

At the BMI Awards in the US, a ‘roomful of gangstas and playas’ were convinced the Cornwall-born, Bristol-raised Englishman was a lawyer, and not a songwriter picking up an ‘American Urban’ gong – one of three BMIs he received for his work with John Legend on the soul singer’s Evolver album.

In Berlin, clubbing capital of the world, they think he helps run a small minimal techno label. In certain London circles he’s known as the hardworking insider whose past roles at DefJam, Sony Music, Talkin’ Loud, and Source saw him work with a range of artists longer than the horizon. At the BBC, they imagine Fink as perhaps the only musician who has played both the Electric Proms and the actual Proms (was that really the same guy leading a 120-piece orchestra at the Royal Albert Hall in an ‘immense’ cover of Roy Ayers’ Everybody Loves The Sunshine?). 

In record company circles, he’s the producer who worked on the first demos by Amy Winehouse and the writer who’s been crafting hooks for Professor Green. In big-room booths around the world, he’s the internationally-renowned DJ and Ninja Tune stalwart who finally hung up his Sennheisers with a valedictory set at London’s Fabric in 2003. ‘My skillset just seemed so old compared to these guys that could DJ for six hours without one high-hat out of place using Ableton or something,’ he notes admiringly.

Who is Fin Greenall? All of the above. 

Yes, the now-Brighton-based musician acknowledges, he has done – does do – all of those things. ‘But none of that is as important as how I feel when I write songs like "Fear is Like Fire" and "Perfect Darkness". The Fink thing is my main thing.’

As a kid, the one thing of his dad’s that Fin Greenall wasn’t allowed to touch was the old Martin acoustic guitar. ‘It was his one possession where he said, “everything in this house is owned by everybody – apart from that.”’ But with age – and the burgeoning of his son’s skills as a player – came a relaxation of the exclusion zone: Greenall plays the Martin on the punchy, Jeff Buckley-covering-Radiohead-esque "Fear Is Like Fire". It’s sure to become a live stand-out on Fink’s upcoming, 18-month-long world tour. ‘It’s all about trying to look at fear and be optimistic – you can be really negative or fucking embrace it and use it. 

‘The great thing about growing up in a house where music is a big factor,’ he continues, ‘was the fact that music being part of your life was a perfectly natural thing.’ 

Music, it seems, became more than that: it was Greenall’s life. He hoovered up the sounds he heard on John Peel: ‘The Cure, The Smiths, The Orb, African music, Japanese hardcore’. He embraced skateboarding, the music and the fashion – ‘it was an awesome way to grow your own culture’. At university in Leeds, electronic and dance music became everything. 

‘It was definitely about wanting to be part of a revolution that I could call my own,’ he recalls. ‘A couple of friends and I clubbed together our student loans and bought equipment to make ambient techno – we were really inspired by Aphex Twin and The Orb and Moby. We were amazed at how fucking easy it was to make ambient techno. It wasn’t easy to make good ambient techno,’ he laughs. ‘But it was easy enough to make techno good enough to get us signed after six months of mucking around at uni.’ 

The young techno warrior was messianic. 

‘I thought the song was dead, the chorus was dead, playing drums and guitar and bass was so old-school and outdated and why would you want to do that? Dylan did that 50 years ago! We should be part of this new revolution, instrumentalism, acid house, rave culture, techno – this stuff is a brave new avant-garde frontier and you should be involved.’ 

His ardour and his skills saw Greenall become part of the Ninja Tune family – first signed on the back of a cassette-tape demo - as artist, DJ, writer, producer, and remixer. 

‘Brilliant times,’ he sighs nostalgically. ‘Sometimes you’d just have to pinch yourself. Then, other times, you wake up in Bratislava on a Tuesday morning and you’re reminded that there is hard work to all of this.’ All that crate-digging wasn’t all it’s cracked up to be either: ‘You can’t be shit!’ Greenall grins. ‘And because of the community that Ninja has worldwide, if you are shit everybody knows about it the next day. Eight years of DJing have given me an obscenely huge record collection. I just cleared out the breaks section – four crates of twelves that were total pony!’ 

So the wheels of steel started to fall off. 

‘It wasn’t until I’d run that right the way through to its natural conclusion – I’m an international DJ on the biggest DJ label in the world – that I thought: I’m kinda over it. And it was actually working with a young artist straight out of school called Amy Winehouse that inspired me to go, “wow, songs are great! Now I get how difficult it is, and how much talent there is involved in this. It’s more of a challenge than clubbing.”’ 

Greenall melted down his turntables and recast them as a guitar and a stool. Metaphorically speaking. His parents were pleased. ‘My career only made sense to them when I picked up a guitar and started to sing,’ he says. ‘All of a sudden I was doing music, I wasn’t just mucking around. But in my rave days, DJing techno and breaks, they didn’t get that at all. That’s probably why I did it in the first place. 

‘But I realised: if your music had songs in it, it had a much greater reach. Not in business terms, but if a singer of, say, Amy’s calibre sings over this beat, it becomes so much bigger than just a beat. I can’t get rid of my clubbing past, not that I’d want to. But the linear nature of some of my music is definitely because of all those years spent clubbing and DJing, when a very simple idea can make the best club record. And it’s the same with songs – I’m after a really simple riff or really simple lyric or melody. And it’s about keeping that beautiful moment going for as long as you can.’

[links_clean] =>

Fink Website

Facebook
Twitter
Soundcloud

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Busdriver is fixed as one of LA music’s most dynamic indie artist. From his years as a cyher phenom at Project Blowed to his years as a recording artist on Epitaph to his current role as co-head of Hellfyre Club, Busdriver has always challenged rap in the most particular and thoughful of ways.

BD’s first record, Memoirs of the Elephantman, was self released thru Afterlife records (a Project Blowed subcrew at the time)in 1999. Not until his second self-released record, Temporary Forever, came out in 2002 did Busdriver step on the world stage. Sleeper hit "Imaginary Places" turned him into one of many beacons of left-leaning hip-hop at the moment. During this time he was also emceeing at the Hiphop/Drum’n’bass night weekly Concrete Jungle with Daddy Kev, Myka 9, edit and DJ Hive.

After the new success of Temporary Forever, Busdriver signed with Mush records to do a collaborative album with beat/production guru Daedelus and quirky rap talent Radioinactive in 2003. The project was called ‘The Weather’. Their album toyed with daring disjointed production and dexterous rap writing in a way that Busdriver hadn’t in the past. The project amassed a small cult following all its own and aligned Driver’s taste with the output of LA’s electronic music scene.

In 2004, Busdriver began his relationship with Big Dada by releasing with them the Daddy Kev-produced mini-LP, Cosmic Cleavage. This was followed by Busdriver’s official 3rd album, Fear of a Black Tangent, released via Big Dada in the EU and on Mush in the US.

Busdriver’s label dealings grew outside of the rap arena in 2007 when he signed to indie-punk mega-label Epitaph and eventually, it’s more indie-music driven sister label, Anti-. Through them he released RoadKillOvercoat in 2007 and Jhellibeam in 2009. Both albums featured production from DJ Nobody, Nosaj Thing, Free the Robots and Boom Bip. During these years, rap producer culture was in flux in LA and the newly founded Low End Theory began gaining momentum. Producer eDIT (who becomes the head of Glitch Mob) featured Busdriver on "Crunk De Gaulle" (also featuring TTC) off his Alpha Pup debut, Certified Air Raid Material.

Computer Cooties came out in 2010 after BD parted with Anti-. It was a free mixtape featuring collaborations with Flying Lotus, Anti-Pop Consortium, Sister Crayon, Daedelus and Open Mike Eagle. He followed this by joining Hellfyre Club and forming Flash Bang Grenada, a two-man group made of Nocando (founder of Hellfyre Club and original resident of Low End Theory) and himself, created solely to let their musings on popular rap themes run amok. They released their debut 10 Haters in 2011.

In 2012, BD released Beaus$Eros through Fake Four. The album was produced entirely by Loden and had features from Cocorosie and Mike Ladd. It was a departure from rap writing into microclimates of experimental pop but then completely not also. The record was coupled with Regan Farquhar aka Busdriver(Driver) fronting an progressive power pop outfit briefly called Physiccal Forms.

That same year Driver released Arguments with Dreams, an EP marking a return to Big Dada. It was mostly self-produced with stand-out appearances from Das Racist on “Firehydrant” and HFC members Nocando and Mike Eagle on “Wernor Herzog”.

In 2013, Driver helmed and oversaw the production of Dorner Vs. Tookie, the joint mixtape featuring efforts from all the members of Hellfyre Club (Nocando, Busdriver, Open Mike Eagle, milo, Rheteric Ramirez, Kail, VerBS, Taurus Scott, The Kleerz). While doing this Busdriver completed his 8th proper studio album, Perfect Hair. The album features production from Mono/Poly, Jeremiah Jae, Great Dane, Kenny Segal and Riley Lake with guest performances from Danny Brown, Aesop Rock and Mike Eagle. A follow up mixtape from Hellfyre Club in collaboration with producer collective Team Supreme is planned for 2014. But it is only it is pre-production stages now.

More recently Driver has done collaborations with Modeselektor, Son Lux, Latyrx, Kool AD, Lapalux, Sonnymoon, P.O.S, and others on various albums.

[links] =>

Facebook
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Dorner Vs. Tookie Mixtape

[image_upload_id] => 19576 [label_id] => 2 [twitter_username] => Busdriverr [instagram_id] => 7648195 [instagram_username] => busdriverr [link] => [listed] => 1 [sortname] => Busdriver [created] => 2010-07-17 22:15:58 [modified] => 2014-06-16 17:41:15 [slug] => busdriver [fuga_id] => [description_clean] =>

Busdriver is fixed as one of LA music’s most dynamic indie artist. From his years as a cyher phenom at Project Blowed to his years as a recording artist on Epitaph to his current role as co-head of Hellfyre Club, Busdriver has always challenged rap in the most particular and thoughful of ways.

BD’s first record, Memoirs of the Elephantman, was self released thru Afterlife records (a Project Blowed subcrew at the time)in 1999. Not until his second self-released record, Temporary Forever, came out in 2002 did Busdriver step on the world stage. Sleeper hit "Imaginary Places" turned him into one of many beacons of left-leaning hip-hop at the moment. During this time he was also emceeing at the Hiphop/Drum’n’bass night weekly Concrete Jungle with Daddy Kev, Myka 9, edit and DJ Hive.

After the new success of Temporary Forever, Busdriver signed with Mush records to do a collaborative album with beat/production guru Daedelus and quirky rap talent Radioinactive in 2003. The project was called ‘The Weather’. Their album toyed with daring disjointed production and dexterous rap writing in a way that Busdriver hadn’t in the past. The project amassed a small cult following all its own and aligned Driver’s taste with the output of LA’s electronic music scene.

In 2004, Busdriver began his relationship with Big Dada by releasing with them the Daddy Kev-produced mini-LP, Cosmic Cleavage. This was followed by Busdriver’s official 3rd album, Fear of a Black Tangent, released via Big Dada in the EU and on Mush in the US.

Busdriver’s label dealings grew outside of the rap arena in 2007 when he signed to indie-punk mega-label Epitaph and eventually, it’s more indie-music driven sister label, Anti-. Through them he released RoadKillOvercoat in 2007 and Jhellibeam in 2009. Both albums featured production from DJ Nobody, Nosaj Thing, Free the Robots and Boom Bip. During these years, rap producer culture was in flux in LA and the newly founded Low End Theory began gaining momentum. Producer eDIT (who becomes the head of Glitch Mob) featured Busdriver on "Crunk De Gaulle" (also featuring TTC) off his Alpha Pup debut, Certified Air Raid Material.

Computer Cooties came out in 2010 after BD parted with Anti-. It was a free mixtape featuring collaborations with Flying Lotus, Anti-Pop Consortium, Sister Crayon, Daedelus and Open Mike Eagle. He followed this by joining Hellfyre Club and forming Flash Bang Grenada, a two-man group made of Nocando (founder of Hellfyre Club and original resident of Low End Theory) and himself, created solely to let their musings on popular rap themes run amok. They released their debut 10 Haters in 2011.

In 2012, BD released Beaus$Eros through Fake Four. The album was produced entirely by Loden and had features from Cocorosie and Mike Ladd. It was a departure from rap writing into microclimates of experimental pop but then completely not also. The record was coupled with Regan Farquhar aka Busdriver(Driver) fronting an progressive power pop outfit briefly called Physiccal Forms.

That same year Driver released Arguments with Dreams, an EP marking a return to Big Dada. It was mostly self-produced with stand-out appearances from Das Racist on “Firehydrant” and HFC members Nocando and Mike Eagle on “Wernor Herzog”.

In 2013, Driver helmed and oversaw the production of Dorner Vs. Tookie, the joint mixtape featuring efforts from all the members of Hellfyre Club (Nocando, Busdriver, Open Mike Eagle, milo, Rheteric Ramirez, Kail, VerBS, Taurus Scott, The Kleerz). While doing this Busdriver completed his 8th proper studio album, Perfect Hair. The album features production from Mono/Poly, Jeremiah Jae, Great Dane, Kenny Segal and Riley Lake with guest performances from Danny Brown, Aesop Rock and Mike Eagle. A follow up mixtape from Hellfyre Club in collaboration with producer collective Team Supreme is planned for 2014. But it is only it is pre-production stages now.

More recently Driver has done collaborations with Modeselektor, Son Lux, Latyrx, Kool AD, Lapalux, Sonnymoon, P.O.S, and others on various albums.

[links_clean] =>

Facebook
Twitter
SoundCloud
Dorner Vs. Tookie Mixtape

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Fin Greenall, who is the voice and heart behind Fink, often gets mistaken for other people. 

At the BMI Awards in the US, a ‘roomful of gangstas and playas’ were convinced the Cornwall-born, Bristol-raised Englishman was a lawyer, and not a songwriter picking up an ‘American Urban’ gong – one of three BMIs he received for his work with John Legend on the soul singer’s Evolver album.

In Berlin, clubbing capital of the world, they think he helps run a small minimal techno label. In certain London circles he’s known as the hardworking insider whose past roles at DefJam, Sony Music, Talkin’ Loud, and Source saw him work with a range of artists longer than the horizon. At the BBC, they imagine Fink as perhaps the only musician who has played both the Electric Proms and the actual Proms (was that really the same guy leading a 120-piece orchestra at the Royal Albert Hall in an ‘immense’ cover of Roy Ayers’ Everybody Loves The Sunshine?). 

In record company circles, he’s the producer who worked on the first demos by Amy Winehouse and the writer who’s been crafting hooks for Professor Green. In big-room booths around the world, he’s the internationally-renowned DJ and Ninja Tune stalwart who finally hung up his Sennheisers with a valedictory set at London’s Fabric in 2003. ‘My skillset just seemed so old compared to these guys that could DJ for six hours without one high-hat out of place using Ableton or something,’ he notes admiringly.

Who is Fin Greenall? All of the above. 

Yes, the now-Brighton-based musician acknowledges, he has done – does do – all of those things. ‘But none of that is as important as how I feel when I write songs like "Fear is Like Fire" and "Perfect Darkness". The Fink thing is my main thing.’

As a kid, the one thing of his dad’s that Fin Greenall wasn’t allowed to touch was the old Martin acoustic guitar. ‘It was his one possession where he said, “everything in this house is owned by everybody – apart from that.”’ But with age – and the burgeoning of his son’s skills as a player – came a relaxation of the exclusion zone: Greenall plays the Martin on the punchy, Jeff Buckley-covering-Radiohead-esque "Fear Is Like Fire". It’s sure to become a live stand-out on Fink’s upcoming, 18-month-long world tour. ‘It’s all about trying to look at fear and be optimistic – you can be really negative or fucking embrace it and use it. 

‘The great thing about growing up in a house where music is a big factor,’ he continues, ‘was the fact that music being part of your life was a perfectly natural thing.’ 

Music, it seems, became more than that: it was Greenall’s life. He hoovered up the sounds he heard on John Peel: ‘The Cure, The Smiths, The Orb, African music, Japanese hardcore’. He embraced skateboarding, the music and the fashion – ‘it was an awesome way to grow your own culture’. At university in Leeds, electronic and dance music became everything. 

‘It was definitely about wanting to be part of a revolution that I could call my own,’ he recalls. ‘A couple of friends and I clubbed together our student loans and bought equipment to make ambient techno – we were really inspired by Aphex Twin and The Orb and Moby. We were amazed at how fucking easy it was to make ambient techno. It wasn’t easy to make good ambient techno,’ he laughs. ‘But it was easy enough to make techno good enough to get us signed after six months of mucking around at uni.’ 

The young techno warrior was messianic. 

‘I thought the song was dead, the chorus was dead, playing drums and guitar and bass was so old-school and outdated and why would you want to do that? Dylan did that 50 years ago! We should be part of this new revolution, instrumentalism, acid house, rave culture, techno – this stuff is a brave new avant-garde frontier and you should be involved.’ 

His ardour and his skills saw Greenall become part of the Ninja Tune family – first signed on the back of a cassette-tape demo - as artist, DJ, writer, producer, and remixer. 

‘Brilliant times,’ he sighs nostalgically. ‘Sometimes you’d just have to pinch yourself. Then, other times, you wake up in Bratislava on a Tuesday morning and you’re reminded that there is hard work to all of this.’ All that crate-digging wasn’t all it’s cracked up to be either: ‘You can’t be shit!’ Greenall grins. ‘And because of the community that Ninja has worldwide, if you are shit everybody knows about it the next day. Eight years of DJing have given me an obscenely huge record collection. I just cleared out the breaks section – four crates of twelves that were total pony!’ 

So the wheels of steel started to fall off. 

‘It wasn’t until I’d run that right the way through to its natural conclusion – I’m an international DJ on the biggest DJ label in the world – that I thought: I’m kinda over it. And it was actually working with a young artist straight out of school called Amy Winehouse that inspired me to go, “wow, songs are great! Now I get how difficult it is, and how much talent there is involved in this. It’s more of a challenge than clubbing.”’ 

Greenall melted down his turntables and recast them as a guitar and a stool. Metaphorically speaking. His parents were pleased. ‘My career only made sense to them when I picked up a guitar and started to sing,’ he says. ‘All of a sudden I was doing music, I wasn’t just mucking around. But in my rave days, DJing techno and breaks, they didn’t get that at all. That’s probably why I did it in the first place. 

‘But I realised: if your music had songs in it, it had a much greater reach. Not in business terms, but if a singer of, say, Amy’s calibre sings over this beat, it becomes so much bigger than just a beat. I can’t get rid of my clubbing past, not that I’d want to. But the linear nature of some of my music is definitely because of all those years spent clubbing and DJing, when a very simple idea can make the best club record. And it’s the same with songs – I’m after a really simple riff or really simple lyric or melody. And it’s about keeping that beautiful moment going for as long as you can.’

[links] =>

Fink Website

Facebook
Twitter
Soundcloud

[image_upload_id] => 19785 [label_id] => 13 [twitter_username] => Finkmusic [instagram_id] => [instagram_username] => [link] => [listed] => 1 [sortname] => Fink [created] => 2010-07-17 22:15:58 [modified] => 2014-08-11 14:09:15 [slug] => fink [fuga_id] => [description_clean] =>

Fin Greenall, who is the voice and heart behind Fink, often gets mistaken for other people. 

At the BMI Awards in the US, a ‘roomful of gangstas and playas’ were convinced the Cornwall-born, Bristol-raised Englishman was a lawyer, and not a songwriter picking up an ‘American Urban’ gong – one of three BMIs he received for his work with John Legend on the soul singer’s Evolver album.

In Berlin, clubbing capital of the world, they think he helps run a small minimal techno label. In certain London circles he’s known as the hardworking insider whose past roles at DefJam, Sony Music, Talkin’ Loud, and Source saw him work with a range of artists longer than the horizon. At the BBC, they imagine Fink as perhaps the only musician who has played both the Electric Proms and the actual Proms (was that really the same guy leading a 120-piece orchestra at the Royal Albert Hall in an ‘immense’ cover of Roy Ayers’ Everybody Loves The Sunshine?). 

In record company circles, he’s the producer who worked on the first demos by Amy Winehouse and the writer who’s been crafting hooks for Professor Green. In big-room booths around the world, he’s the internationally-renowned DJ and Ninja Tune stalwart who finally hung up his Sennheisers with a valedictory set at London’s Fabric in 2003. ‘My skillset just seemed so old compared to these guys that could DJ for six hours without one high-hat out of place using Ableton or something,’ he notes admiringly.

Who is Fin Greenall? All of the above. 

Yes, the now-Brighton-based musician acknowledges, he has done – does do – all of those things. ‘But none of that is as important as how I feel when I write songs like "Fear is Like Fire" and "Perfect Darkness". The Fink thing is my main thing.’

As a kid, the one thing of his dad’s that Fin Greenall wasn’t allowed to touch was the old Martin acoustic guitar. ‘It was his one possession where he said, “everything in this house is owned by everybody – apart from that.”’ But with age – and the burgeoning of his son’s skills as a player – came a relaxation of the exclusion zone: Greenall plays the Martin on the punchy, Jeff Buckley-covering-Radiohead-esque "Fear Is Like Fire". It’s sure to become a live stand-out on Fink’s upcoming, 18-month-long world tour. ‘It’s all about trying to look at fear and be optimistic – you can be really negative or fucking embrace it and use it. 

‘The great thing about growing up in a house where music is a big factor,’ he continues, ‘was the fact that music being part of your life was a perfectly natural thing.’ 

Music, it seems, became more than that: it was Greenall’s life. He hoovered up the sounds he heard on John Peel: ‘The Cure, The Smiths, The Orb, African music, Japanese hardcore’. He embraced skateboarding, the music and the fashion – ‘it was an awesome way to grow your own culture’. At university in Leeds, electronic and dance music became everything. 

‘It was definitely about wanting to be part of a revolution that I could call my own,’ he recalls. ‘A couple of friends and I clubbed together our student loans and bought equipment to make ambient techno – we were really inspired by Aphex Twin and The Orb and Moby. We were amazed at how fucking easy it was to make ambient techno. It wasn’t easy to make good ambient techno,’ he laughs. ‘But it was easy enough to make techno good enough to get us signed after six months of mucking around at uni.’ 

The young techno warrior was messianic. 

‘I thought the song was dead, the chorus was dead, playing drums and guitar and bass was so old-school and outdated and why would you want to do that? Dylan did that 50 years ago! We should be part of this new revolution, instrumentalism, acid house, rave culture, techno – this stuff is a brave new avant-garde frontier and you should be involved.’ 

His ardour and his skills saw Greenall become part of the Ninja Tune family – first signed on the back of a cassette-tape demo - as artist, DJ, writer, producer, and remixer. 

‘Brilliant times,’ he sighs nostalgically. ‘Sometimes you’d just have to pinch yourself. Then, other times, you wake up in Bratislava on a Tuesday morning and you’re reminded that there is hard work to all of this.’ All that crate-digging wasn’t all it’s cracked up to be either: ‘You can’t be shit!’ Greenall grins. ‘And because of the community that Ninja has worldwide, if you are shit everybody knows about it the next day. Eight years of DJing have given me an obscenely huge record collection. I just cleared out the breaks section – four crates of twelves that were total pony!’ 

So the wheels of steel started to fall off. 

‘It wasn’t until I’d run that right the way through to its natural conclusion – I’m an international DJ on the biggest DJ label in the world – that I thought: I’m kinda over it. And it was actually working with a young artist straight out of school called Amy Winehouse that inspired me to go, “wow, songs are great! Now I get how difficult it is, and how much talent there is involved in this. It’s more of a challenge than clubbing.”’ 

Greenall melted down his turntables and recast them as a guitar and a stool. Metaphorically speaking. His parents were pleased. ‘My career only made sense to them when I picked up a guitar and started to sing,’ he says. ‘All of a sudden I was doing music, I wasn’t just mucking around. But in my rave days, DJing techno and breaks, they didn’t get that at all. That’s probably why I did it in the first place. 

‘But I realised: if your music had songs in it, it had a much greater reach. Not in business terms, but if a singer of, say, Amy’s calibre sings over this beat, it becomes so much bigger than just a beat. I can’t get rid of my clubbing past, not that I’d want to. But the linear nature of some of my music is definitely because of all those years spent clubbing and DJing, when a very simple idea can make the best club record. And it’s the same with songs – I’m after a really simple riff or really simple lyric or melody. And it’s about keeping that beautiful moment going for as long as you can.’

[links_clean] =>

Fink Website

Facebook
Twitter
Soundcloud

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Busdriver is fixed as one of LA music’s most dynamic indie artist. From his years as a cyher phenom at Project Blowed to his years as a recording artist on Epitaph to his current role as co-head of Hellfyre Club, Busdriver has always challenged rap in the most particular and thoughful of ways.

BD’s first record, Memoirs of the Elephantman, was self released thru Afterlife records (a Project Blowed subcrew at the time)in 1999. Not until his second self-released record, Temporary Forever, came out in 2002 did Busdriver step on the world stage. Sleeper hit "Imaginary Places" turned him into one of many beacons of left-leaning hip-hop at the moment. During this time he was also emceeing at the Hiphop/Drum’n’bass night weekly Concrete Jungle with Daddy Kev, Myka 9, edit and DJ Hive.

After the new success of Temporary Forever, Busdriver signed with Mush records to do a collaborative album with beat/production guru Daedelus and quirky rap talent Radioinactive in 2003. The project was called ‘The Weather’. Their album toyed with daring disjointed production and dexterous rap writing in a way that Busdriver hadn’t in the past. The project amassed a small cult following all its own and aligned Driver’s taste with the output of LA’s electronic music scene.

In 2004, Busdriver began his relationship with Big Dada by releasing with them the Daddy Kev-produced mini-LP, Cosmic Cleavage. This was followed by Busdriver’s official 3rd album, Fear of a Black Tangent, released via Big Dada in the EU and on Mush in the US.

Busdriver’s label dealings grew outside of the rap arena in 2007 when he signed to indie-punk mega-label Epitaph and eventually, it’s more indie-music driven sister label, Anti-. Through them he released RoadKillOvercoat in 2007 and Jhellibeam in 2009. Both albums featured production from DJ Nobody, Nosaj Thing, Free the Robots and Boom Bip. During these years, rap producer culture was in flux in LA and the newly founded Low End Theory began gaining momentum. Producer eDIT (who becomes the head of Glitch Mob) featured Busdriver on "Crunk De Gaulle" (also featuring TTC) off his Alpha Pup debut, Certified Air Raid Material.

Computer Cooties came out in 2010 after BD parted with Anti-. It was a free mixtape featuring collaborations with Flying Lotus, Anti-Pop Consortium, Sister Crayon, Daedelus and Open Mike Eagle. He followed this by joining Hellfyre Club and forming Flash Bang Grenada, a two-man group made of Nocando (founder of Hellfyre Club and original resident of Low End Theory) and himself, created solely to let their musings on popular rap themes run amok. They released their debut 10 Haters in 2011.

In 2012, BD released Beaus$Eros through Fake Four. The album was produced entirely by Loden and had features from Cocorosie and Mike Ladd. It was a departure from rap writing into microclimates of experimental pop but then completely not also. The record was coupled with Regan Farquhar aka Busdriver(Driver) fronting an progressive power pop outfit briefly called Physiccal Forms.

That same year Driver released Arguments with Dreams, an EP marking a return to Big Dada. It was mostly self-produced with stand-out appearances from Das Racist on “Firehydrant” and HFC members Nocando and Mike Eagle on “Wernor Herzog”.

In 2013, Driver helmed and oversaw the production of Dorner Vs. Tookie, the joint mixtape featuring efforts from all the members of Hellfyre Club (Nocando, Busdriver, Open Mike Eagle, milo, Rheteric Ramirez, Kail, VerBS, Taurus Scott, The Kleerz). While doing this Busdriver completed his 8th proper studio album, Perfect Hair. The album features production from Mono/Poly, Jeremiah Jae, Great Dane, Kenny Segal and Riley Lake with guest performances from Danny Brown, Aesop Rock and Mike Eagle. A follow up mixtape from Hellfyre Club in collaboration with producer collective Team Supreme is planned for 2014. But it is only it is pre-production stages now.

More recently Driver has done collaborations with Modeselektor, Son Lux, Latyrx, Kool AD, Lapalux, Sonnymoon, P.O.S, and others on various albums.

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[image_upload_id] => 19576 [label_id] => 2 [twitter_username] => Busdriverr [instagram_id] => 7648195 [instagram_username] => busdriverr [link] => [listed] => 1 [sortname] => Busdriver [created] => 2010-07-17 22:15:58 [modified] => 2014-06-16 17:41:15 [slug] => busdriver [fuga_id] => [description_clean] =>

Busdriver is fixed as one of LA music’s most dynamic indie artist. From his years as a cyher phenom at Project Blowed to his years as a recording artist on Epitaph to his current role as co-head of Hellfyre Club, Busdriver has always challenged rap in the most particular and thoughful of ways.

BD’s first record, Memoirs of the Elephantman, was self released thru Afterlife records (a Project Blowed subcrew at the time)in 1999. Not until his second self-released record, Temporary Forever, came out in 2002 did Busdriver step on the world stage. Sleeper hit "Imaginary Places" turned him into one of many beacons of left-leaning hip-hop at the moment. During this time he was also emceeing at the Hiphop/Drum’n’bass night weekly Concrete Jungle with Daddy Kev, Myka 9, edit and DJ Hive.

After the new success of Temporary Forever, Busdriver signed with Mush records to do a collaborative album with beat/production guru Daedelus and quirky rap talent Radioinactive in 2003. The project was called ‘The Weather’. Their album toyed with daring disjointed production and dexterous rap writing in a way that Busdriver hadn’t in the past. The project amassed a small cult following all its own and aligned Driver’s taste with the output of LA’s electronic music scene.

In 2004, Busdriver began his relationship with Big Dada by releasing with them the Daddy Kev-produced mini-LP, Cosmic Cleavage. This was followed by Busdriver’s official 3rd album, Fear of a Black Tangent, released via Big Dada in the EU and on Mush in the US.

Busdriver’s label dealings grew outside of the rap arena in 2007 when he signed to indie-punk mega-label Epitaph and eventually, it’s more indie-music driven sister label, Anti-. Through them he released RoadKillOvercoat in 2007 and Jhellibeam in 2009. Both albums featured production from DJ Nobody, Nosaj Thing, Free the Robots and Boom Bip. During these years, rap producer culture was in flux in LA and the newly founded Low End Theory began gaining momentum. Producer eDIT (who becomes the head of Glitch Mob) featured Busdriver on "Crunk De Gaulle" (also featuring TTC) off his Alpha Pup debut, Certified Air Raid Material.

Computer Cooties came out in 2010 after BD parted with Anti-. It was a free mixtape featuring collaborations with Flying Lotus, Anti-Pop Consortium, Sister Crayon, Daedelus and Open Mike Eagle. He followed this by joining Hellfyre Club and forming Flash Bang Grenada, a two-man group made of Nocando (founder of Hellfyre Club and original resident of Low End Theory) and himself, created solely to let their musings on popular rap themes run amok. They released their debut 10 Haters in 2011.

In 2012, BD released Beaus$Eros through Fake Four. The album was produced entirely by Loden and had features from Cocorosie and Mike Ladd. It was a departure from rap writing into microclimates of experimental pop but then completely not also. The record was coupled with Regan Farquhar aka Busdriver(Driver) fronting an progressive power pop outfit briefly called Physiccal Forms.

That same year Driver released Arguments with Dreams, an EP marking a return to Big Dada. It was mostly self-produced with stand-out appearances from Das Racist on “Firehydrant” and HFC members Nocando and Mike Eagle on “Wernor Herzog”.

In 2013, Driver helmed and oversaw the production of Dorner Vs. Tookie, the joint mixtape featuring efforts from all the members of Hellfyre Club (Nocando, Busdriver, Open Mike Eagle, milo, Rheteric Ramirez, Kail, VerBS, Taurus Scott, The Kleerz). While doing this Busdriver completed his 8th proper studio album, Perfect Hair. The album features production from Mono/Poly, Jeremiah Jae, Great Dane, Kenny Segal and Riley Lake with guest performances from Danny Brown, Aesop Rock and Mike Eagle. A follow up mixtape from Hellfyre Club in collaboration with producer collective Team Supreme is planned for 2014. But it is only it is pre-production stages now.

More recently Driver has done collaborations with Modeselektor, Son Lux, Latyrx, Kool AD, Lapalux, Sonnymoon, P.O.S, and others on various albums.

[links_clean] =>

Facebook
Twitter
SoundCloud
Dorner Vs. Tookie Mixtape

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Fin Greenall, who is the voice and heart behind Fink, often gets mistaken for other people. 

At the BMI Awards in the US, a ‘roomful of gangstas and playas’ were convinced the Cornwall-born, Bristol-raised Englishman was a lawyer, and not a songwriter picking up an ‘American Urban’ gong – one of three BMIs he received for his work with John Legend on the soul singer’s Evolver album.

In Berlin, clubbing capital of the world, they think he helps run a small minimal techno label. In certain London circles he’s known as the hardworking insider whose past roles at DefJam, Sony Music, Talkin’ Loud, and Source saw him work with a range of artists longer than the horizon. At the BBC, they imagine Fink as perhaps the only musician who has played both the Electric Proms and the actual Proms (was that really the same guy leading a 120-piece orchestra at the Royal Albert Hall in an ‘immense’ cover of Roy Ayers’ Everybody Loves The Sunshine?). 

In record company circles, he’s the producer who worked on the first demos by Amy Winehouse and the writer who’s been crafting hooks for Professor Green. In big-room booths around the world, he’s the internationally-renowned DJ and Ninja Tune stalwart who finally hung up his Sennheisers with a valedictory set at London’s Fabric in 2003. ‘My skillset just seemed so old compared to these guys that could DJ for six hours without one high-hat out of place using Ableton or something,’ he notes admiringly.

Who is Fin Greenall? All of the above. 

Yes, the now-Brighton-based musician acknowledges, he has done – does do – all of those things. ‘But none of that is as important as how I feel when I write songs like "Fear is Like Fire" and "Perfect Darkness". The Fink thing is my main thing.’

As a kid, the one thing of his dad’s that Fin Greenall wasn’t allowed to touch was the old Martin acoustic guitar. ‘It was his one possession where he said, “everything in this house is owned by everybody – apart from that.”’ But with age – and the burgeoning of his son’s skills as a player – came a relaxation of the exclusion zone: Greenall plays the Martin on the punchy, Jeff Buckley-covering-Radiohead-esque "Fear Is Like Fire". It’s sure to become a live stand-out on Fink’s upcoming, 18-month-long world tour. ‘It’s all about trying to look at fear and be optimistic – you can be really negative or fucking embrace it and use it. 

‘The great thing about growing up in a house where music is a big factor,’ he continues, ‘was the fact that music being part of your life was a perfectly natural thing.’ 

Music, it seems, became more than that: it was Greenall’s life. He hoovered up the sounds he heard on John Peel: ‘The Cure, The Smiths, The Orb, African music, Japanese hardcore’. He embraced skateboarding, the music and the fashion – ‘it was an awesome way to grow your own culture’. At university in Leeds, electronic and dance music became everything. 

‘It was definitely about wanting to be part of a revolution that I could call my own,’ he recalls. ‘A couple of friends and I clubbed together our student loans and bought equipment to make ambient techno – we were really inspired by Aphex Twin and The Orb and Moby. We were amazed at how fucking easy it was to make ambient techno. It wasn’t easy to make good ambient techno,’ he laughs. ‘But it was easy enough to make techno good enough to get us signed after six months of mucking around at uni.’ 

The young techno warrior was messianic. 

‘I thought the song was dead, the chorus was dead, playing drums and guitar and bass was so old-school and outdated and why would you want to do that? Dylan did that 50 years ago! We should be part of this new revolution, instrumentalism, acid house, rave culture, techno – this stuff is a brave new avant-garde frontier and you should be involved.’ 

His ardour and his skills saw Greenall become part of the Ninja Tune family – first signed on the back of a cassette-tape demo - as artist, DJ, writer, producer, and remixer. 

‘Brilliant times,’ he sighs nostalgically. ‘Sometimes you’d just have to pinch yourself. Then, other times, you wake up in Bratislava on a Tuesday morning and you’re reminded that there is hard work to all of this.’ All that crate-digging wasn’t all it’s cracked up to be either: ‘You can’t be shit!’ Greenall grins. ‘And because of the community that Ninja has worldwide, if you are shit everybody knows about it the next day. Eight years of DJing have given me an obscenely huge record collection. I just cleared out the breaks section – four crates of twelves that were total pony!’ 

So the wheels of steel started to fall off. 

‘It wasn’t until I’d run that right the way through to its natural conclusion – I’m an international DJ on the biggest DJ label in the world – that I thought: I’m kinda over it. And it was actually working with a young artist straight out of school called Amy Winehouse that inspired me to go, “wow, songs are great! Now I get how difficult it is, and how much talent there is involved in this. It’s more of a challenge than clubbing.”’ 

Greenall melted down his turntables and recast them as a guitar and a stool. Metaphorically speaking. His parents were pleased. ‘My career only made sense to them when I picked up a guitar and started to sing,’ he says. ‘All of a sudden I was doing music, I wasn’t just mucking around. But in my rave days, DJing techno and breaks, they didn’t get that at all. That’s probably why I did it in the first place. 

‘But I realised: if your music had songs in it, it had a much greater reach. Not in business terms, but if a singer of, say, Amy’s calibre sings over this beat, it becomes so much bigger than just a beat. I can’t get rid of my clubbing past, not that I’d want to. But the linear nature of some of my music is definitely because of all those years spent clubbing and DJing, when a very simple idea can make the best club record. And it’s the same with songs – I’m after a really simple riff or really simple lyric or melody. And it’s about keeping that beautiful moment going for as long as you can.’

[links] =>

Fink Website

Facebook
Twitter
Soundcloud

[image_upload_id] => 19785 [label_id] => 13 [twitter_username] => Finkmusic [instagram_id] => [instagram_username] => [link] => [listed] => 1 [sortname] => Fink [created] => 2010-07-17 22:15:58 [modified] => 2014-08-11 14:09:15 [slug] => fink [fuga_id] => [description_clean] =>

Fin Greenall, who is the voice and heart behind Fink, often gets mistaken for other people. 

At the BMI Awards in the US, a ‘roomful of gangstas and playas’ were convinced the Cornwall-born, Bristol-raised Englishman was a lawyer, and not a songwriter picking up an ‘American Urban’ gong – one of three BMIs he received for his work with John Legend on the soul singer’s Evolver album.

In Berlin, clubbing capital of the world, they think he helps run a small minimal techno label. In certain London circles he’s known as the hardworking insider whose past roles at DefJam, Sony Music, Talkin’ Loud, and Source saw him work with a range of artists longer than the horizon. At the BBC, they imagine Fink as perhaps the only musician who has played both the Electric Proms and the actual Proms (was that really the same guy leading a 120-piece orchestra at the Royal Albert Hall in an ‘immense’ cover of Roy Ayers’ Everybody Loves The Sunshine?). 

In record company circles, he’s the producer who worked on the first demos by Amy Winehouse and the writer who’s been crafting hooks for Professor Green. In big-room booths around the world, he’s the internationally-renowned DJ and Ninja Tune stalwart who finally hung up his Sennheisers with a valedictory set at London’s Fabric in 2003. ‘My skillset just seemed so old compared to these guys that could DJ for six hours without one high-hat out of place using Ableton or something,’ he notes admiringly.

Who is Fin Greenall? All of the above. 

Yes, the now-Brighton-based musician acknowledges, he has done – does do – all of those things. ‘But none of that is as important as how I feel when I write songs like "Fear is Like Fire" and "Perfect Darkness". The Fink thing is my main thing.’

As a kid, the one thing of his dad’s that Fin Greenall wasn’t allowed to touch was the old Martin acoustic guitar. ‘It was his one possession where he said, “everything in this house is owned by everybody – apart from that.”’ But with age – and the burgeoning of his son’s skills as a player – came a relaxation of the exclusion zone: Greenall plays the Martin on the punchy, Jeff Buckley-covering-Radiohead-esque "Fear Is Like Fire". It’s sure to become a live stand-out on Fink’s upcoming, 18-month-long world tour. ‘It’s all about trying to look at fear and be optimistic – you can be really negative or fucking embrace it and use it. 

‘The great thing about growing up in a house where music is a big factor,’ he continues, ‘was the fact that music being part of your life was a perfectly natural thing.’ 

Music, it seems, became more than that: it was Greenall’s life. He hoovered up the sounds he heard on John Peel: ‘The Cure, The Smiths, The Orb, African music, Japanese hardcore’. He embraced skateboarding, the music and the fashion – ‘it was an awesome way to grow your own culture’. At university in Leeds, electronic and dance music became everything. 

‘It was definitely about wanting to be part of a revolution that I could call my own,’ he recalls. ‘A couple of friends and I clubbed together our student loans and bought equipment to make ambient techno – we were really inspired by Aphex Twin and The Orb and Moby. We were amazed at how fucking easy it was to make ambient techno. It wasn’t easy to make good ambient techno,’ he laughs. ‘But it was easy enough to make techno good enough to get us signed after six months of mucking around at uni.’ 

The young techno warrior was messianic. 

‘I thought the song was dead, the chorus was dead, playing drums and guitar and bass was so old-school and outdated and why would you want to do that? Dylan did that 50 years ago! We should be part of this new revolution, instrumentalism, acid house, rave culture, techno – this stuff is a brave new avant-garde frontier and you should be involved.’ 

His ardour and his skills saw Greenall become part of the Ninja Tune family – first signed on the back of a cassette-tape demo - as artist, DJ, writer, producer, and remixer. 

‘Brilliant times,’ he sighs nostalgically. ‘Sometimes you’d just have to pinch yourself. Then, other times, you wake up in Bratislava on a Tuesday morning and you’re reminded that there is hard work to all of this.’ All that crate-digging wasn’t all it’s cracked up to be either: ‘You can’t be shit!’ Greenall grins. ‘And because of the community that Ninja has worldwide, if you are shit everybody knows about it the next day. Eight years of DJing have given me an obscenely huge record collection. I just cleared out the breaks section – four crates of twelves that were total pony!’ 

So the wheels of steel started to fall off. 

‘It wasn’t until I’d run that right the way through to its natural conclusion – I’m an international DJ on the biggest DJ label in the world – that I thought: I’m kinda over it. And it was actually working with a young artist straight out of school called Amy Winehouse that inspired me to go, “wow, songs are great! Now I get how difficult it is, and how much talent there is involved in this. It’s more of a challenge than clubbing.”’ 

Greenall melted down his turntables and recast them as a guitar and a stool. Metaphorically speaking. His parents were pleased. ‘My career only made sense to them when I picked up a guitar and started to sing,’ he says. ‘All of a sudden I was doing music, I wasn’t just mucking around. But in my rave days, DJing techno and breaks, they didn’t get that at all. That’s probably why I did it in the first place. 

‘But I realised: if your music had songs in it, it had a much greater reach. Not in business terms, but if a singer of, say, Amy’s calibre sings over this beat, it becomes so much bigger than just a beat. I can’t get rid of my clubbing past, not that I’d want to. But the linear nature of some of my music is definitely because of all those years spent clubbing and DJing, when a very simple idea can make the best club record. And it’s the same with songs – I’m after a really simple riff or really simple lyric or melody. And it’s about keeping that beautiful moment going for as long as you can.’

[links_clean] =>

Fink Website

Facebook
Twitter
Soundcloud

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Busdriver is fixed as one of LA music’s most dynamic indie artist. From his years as a cyher phenom at Project Blowed to his years as a recording artist on Epitaph to his current role as co-head of Hellfyre Club, Busdriver has always challenged rap in the most particular and thoughful of ways.

BD’s first record, Memoirs of the Elephantman, was self released thru Afterlife records (a Project Blowed subcrew at the time)in 1999. Not until his second self-released record, Temporary Forever, came out in 2002 did Busdriver step on the world stage. Sleeper hit "Imaginary Places" turned him into one of many beacons of left-leaning hip-hop at the moment. During this time he was also emceeing at the Hiphop/Drum’n’bass night weekly Concrete Jungle with Daddy Kev, Myka 9, edit and DJ Hive.

After the new success of Temporary Forever, Busdriver signed with Mush records to do a collaborative album with beat/production guru Daedelus and quirky rap talent Radioinactive in 2003. The project was called ‘The Weather’. Their album toyed with daring disjointed production and dexterous rap writing in a way that Busdriver hadn’t in the past. The project amassed a small cult following all its own and aligned Driver’s taste with the output of LA’s electronic music scene.

In 2004, Busdriver began his relationship with Big Dada by releasing with them the Daddy Kev-produced mini-LP, Cosmic Cleavage. This was followed by Busdriver’s official 3rd album, Fear of a Black Tangent, released via Big Dada in the EU and on Mush in the US.

Busdriver’s label dealings grew outside of the rap arena in 2007 when he signed to indie-punk mega-label Epitaph and eventually, it’s more indie-music driven sister label, Anti-. Through them he released RoadKillOvercoat in 2007 and Jhellibeam in 2009. Both albums featured production from DJ Nobody, Nosaj Thing, Free the Robots and Boom Bip. During these years, rap producer culture was in flux in LA and the newly founded Low End Theory began gaining momentum. Producer eDIT (who becomes the head of Glitch Mob) featured Busdriver on "Crunk De Gaulle" (also featuring TTC) off his Alpha Pup debut, Certified Air Raid Material.

Computer Cooties came out in 2010 after BD parted with Anti-. It was a free mixtape featuring collaborations with Flying Lotus, Anti-Pop Consortium, Sister Crayon, Daedelus and Open Mike Eagle. He followed this by joining Hellfyre Club and forming Flash Bang Grenada, a two-man group made of Nocando (founder of Hellfyre Club and original resident of Low End Theory) and himself, created solely to let their musings on popular rap themes run amok. They released their debut 10 Haters in 2011.

In 2012, BD released Beaus$Eros through Fake Four. The album was produced entirely by Loden and had features from Cocorosie and Mike Ladd. It was a departure from rap writing into microclimates of experimental pop but then completely not also. The record was coupled with Regan Farquhar aka Busdriver(Driver) fronting an progressive power pop outfit briefly called Physiccal Forms.

That same year Driver released Arguments with Dreams, an EP marking a return to Big Dada. It was mostly self-produced with stand-out appearances from Das Racist on “Firehydrant” and HFC members Nocando and Mike Eagle on “Wernor Herzog”.

In 2013, Driver helmed and oversaw the production of Dorner Vs. Tookie, the joint mixtape featuring efforts from all the members of Hellfyre Club (Nocando, Busdriver, Open Mike Eagle, milo, Rheteric Ramirez, Kail, VerBS, Taurus Scott, The Kleerz). While doing this Busdriver completed his 8th proper studio album, Perfect Hair. The album features production from Mono/Poly, Jeremiah Jae, Great Dane, Kenny Segal and Riley Lake with guest performances from Danny Brown, Aesop Rock and Mike Eagle. A follow up mixtape from Hellfyre Club in collaboration with producer collective Team Supreme is planned for 2014. But it is only it is pre-production stages now.

More recently Driver has done collaborations with Modeselektor, Son Lux, Latyrx, Kool AD, Lapalux, Sonnymoon, P.O.S, and others on various albums.

[links] =>

Facebook
Twitter
SoundCloud
Dorner Vs. Tookie Mixtape

[image_upload_id] => 19576 [label_id] => 2 [twitter_username] => Busdriverr [instagram_id] => 7648195 [instagram_username] => busdriverr [link] => [listed] => 1 [sortname] => Busdriver [created] => 2010-07-17 22:15:58 [modified] => 2014-06-16 17:41:15 [slug] => busdriver [fuga_id] => [description_clean] =>

Busdriver is fixed as one of LA music’s most dynamic indie artist. From his years as a cyher phenom at Project Blowed to his years as a recording artist on Epitaph to his current role as co-head of Hellfyre Club, Busdriver has always challenged rap in the most particular and thoughful of ways.

BD’s first record, Memoirs of the Elephantman, was self released thru Afterlife records (a Project Blowed subcrew at the time)in 1999. Not until his second self-released record, Temporary Forever, came out in 2002 did Busdriver step on the world stage. Sleeper hit "Imaginary Places" turned him into one of many beacons of left-leaning hip-hop at the moment. During this time he was also emceeing at the Hiphop/Drum’n’bass night weekly Concrete Jungle with Daddy Kev, Myka 9, edit and DJ Hive.

After the new success of Temporary Forever, Busdriver signed with Mush records to do a collaborative album with beat/production guru Daedelus and quirky rap talent Radioinactive in 2003. The project was called ‘The Weather’. Their album toyed with daring disjointed production and dexterous rap writing in a way that Busdriver hadn’t in the past. The project amassed a small cult following all its own and aligned Driver’s taste with the output of LA’s electronic music scene.

In 2004, Busdriver began his relationship with Big Dada by releasing with them the Daddy Kev-produced mini-LP, Cosmic Cleavage. This was followed by Busdriver’s official 3rd album, Fear of a Black Tangent, released via Big Dada in the EU and on Mush in the US.

Busdriver’s label dealings grew outside of the rap arena in 2007 when he signed to indie-punk mega-label Epitaph and eventually, it’s more indie-music driven sister label, Anti-. Through them he released RoadKillOvercoat in 2007 and Jhellibeam in 2009. Both albums featured production from DJ Nobody, Nosaj Thing, Free the Robots and Boom Bip. During these years, rap producer culture was in flux in LA and the newly founded Low End Theory began gaining momentum. Producer eDIT (who becomes the head of Glitch Mob) featured Busdriver on "Crunk De Gaulle" (also featuring TTC) off his Alpha Pup debut, Certified Air Raid Material.

Computer Cooties came out in 2010 after BD parted with Anti-. It was a free mixtape featuring collaborations with Flying Lotus, Anti-Pop Consortium, Sister Crayon, Daedelus and Open Mike Eagle. He followed this by joining Hellfyre Club and forming Flash Bang Grenada, a two-man group made of Nocando (founder of Hellfyre Club and original resident of Low End Theory) and himself, created solely to let their musings on popular rap themes run amok. They released their debut 10 Haters in 2011.

In 2012, BD released Beaus$Eros through Fake Four. The album was produced entirely by Loden and had features from Cocorosie and Mike Ladd. It was a departure from rap writing into microclimates of experimental pop but then completely not also. The record was coupled with Regan Farquhar aka Busdriver(Driver) fronting an progressive power pop outfit briefly called Physiccal Forms.

That same year Driver released Arguments with Dreams, an EP marking a return to Big Dada. It was mostly self-produced with stand-out appearances from Das Racist on “Firehydrant” and HFC members Nocando and Mike Eagle on “Wernor Herzog”.

In 2013, Driver helmed and oversaw the production of Dorner Vs. Tookie, the joint mixtape featuring efforts from all the members of Hellfyre Club (Nocando, Busdriver, Open Mike Eagle, milo, Rheteric Ramirez, Kail, VerBS, Taurus Scott, The Kleerz). While doing this Busdriver completed his 8th proper studio album, Perfect Hair. The album features production from Mono/Poly, Jeremiah Jae, Great Dane, Kenny Segal and Riley Lake with guest performances from Danny Brown, Aesop Rock and Mike Eagle. A follow up mixtape from Hellfyre Club in collaboration with producer collective Team Supreme is planned for 2014. But it is only it is pre-production stages now.

More recently Driver has done collaborations with Modeselektor, Son Lux, Latyrx, Kool AD, Lapalux, Sonnymoon, P.O.S, and others on various albums.

[links_clean] =>

Facebook
Twitter
SoundCloud
Dorner Vs. Tookie Mixtape

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Fin Greenall, who is the voice and heart behind Fink, often gets mistaken for other people. 

At the BMI Awards in the US, a ‘roomful of gangstas and playas’ were convinced the Cornwall-born, Bristol-raised Englishman was a lawyer, and not a songwriter picking up an ‘American Urban’ gong – one of three BMIs he received for his work with John Legend on the soul singer’s Evolver album.

In Berlin, clubbing capital of the world, they think he helps run a small minimal techno label. In certain London circles he’s known as the hardworking insider whose past roles at DefJam, Sony Music, Talkin’ Loud, and Source saw him work with a range of artists longer than the horizon. At the BBC, they imagine Fink as perhaps the only musician who has played both the Electric Proms and the actual Proms (was that really the same guy leading a 120-piece orchestra at the Royal Albert Hall in an ‘immense’ cover of Roy Ayers’ Everybody Loves The Sunshine?). 

In record company circles, he’s the producer who worked on the first demos by Amy Winehouse and the writer who’s been crafting hooks for Professor Green. In big-room booths around the world, he’s the internationally-renowned DJ and Ninja Tune stalwart who finally hung up his Sennheisers with a valedictory set at London’s Fabric in 2003. ‘My skillset just seemed so old compared to these guys that could DJ for six hours without one high-hat out of place using Ableton or something,’ he notes admiringly.

Who is Fin Greenall? All of the above. 

Yes, the now-Brighton-based musician acknowledges, he has done – does do – all of those things. ‘But none of that is as important as how I feel when I write songs like "Fear is Like Fire" and "Perfect Darkness". The Fink thing is my main thing.’

As a kid, the one thing of his dad’s that Fin Greenall wasn’t allowed to touch was the old Martin acoustic guitar. ‘It was his one possession where he said, “everything in this house is owned by everybody – apart from that.”’ But with age – and the burgeoning of his son’s skills as a player – came a relaxation of the exclusion zone: Greenall plays the Martin on the punchy, Jeff Buckley-covering-Radiohead-esque "Fear Is Like Fire". It’s sure to become a live stand-out on Fink’s upcoming, 18-month-long world tour. ‘It’s all about trying to look at fear and be optimistic – you can be really negative or fucking embrace it and use it. 

‘The great thing about growing up in a house where music is a big factor,’ he continues, ‘was the fact that music being part of your life was a perfectly natural thing.’ 

Music, it seems, became more than that: it was Greenall’s life. He hoovered up the sounds he heard on John Peel: ‘The Cure, The Smiths, The Orb, African music, Japanese hardcore’. He embraced skateboarding, the music and the fashion – ‘it was an awesome way to grow your own culture’. At university in Leeds, electronic and dance music became everything. 

‘It was definitely about wanting to be part of a revolution that I could call my own,’ he recalls. ‘A couple of friends and I clubbed together our student loans and bought equipment to make ambient techno – we were really inspired by Aphex Twin and The Orb and Moby. We were amazed at how fucking easy it was to make ambient techno. It wasn’t easy to make good ambient techno,’ he laughs. ‘But it was easy enough to make techno good enough to get us signed after six months of mucking around at uni.’ 

The young techno warrior was messianic. 

‘I thought the song was dead, the chorus was dead, playing drums and guitar and bass was so old-school and outdated and why would you want to do that? Dylan did that 50 years ago! We should be part of this new revolution, instrumentalism, acid house, rave culture, techno – this stuff is a brave new avant-garde frontier and you should be involved.’ 

His ardour and his skills saw Greenall become part of the Ninja Tune family – first signed on the back of a cassette-tape demo - as artist, DJ, writer, producer, and remixer. 

‘Brilliant times,’ he sighs nostalgically. ‘Sometimes you’d just have to pinch yourself. Then, other times, you wake up in Bratislava on a Tuesday morning and you’re reminded that there is hard work to all of this.’ All that crate-digging wasn’t all it’s cracked up to be either: ‘You can’t be shit!’ Greenall grins. ‘And because of the community that Ninja has worldwide, if you are shit everybody knows about it the next day. Eight years of DJing have given me an obscenely huge record collection. I just cleared out the breaks section – four crates of twelves that were total pony!’ 

So the wheels of steel started to fall off. 

‘It wasn’t until I’d run that right the way through to its natural conclusion – I’m an international DJ on the biggest DJ label in the world – that I thought: I’m kinda over it. And it was actually working with a young artist straight out of school called Amy Winehouse that inspired me to go, “wow, songs are great! Now I get how difficult it is, and how much talent there is involved in this. It’s more of a challenge than clubbing.”’ 

Greenall melted down his turntables and recast them as a guitar and a stool. Metaphorically speaking. His parents were pleased. ‘My career only made sense to them when I picked up a guitar and started to sing,’ he says. ‘All of a sudden I was doing music, I wasn’t just mucking around. But in my rave days, DJing techno and breaks, they didn’t get that at all. That’s probably why I did it in the first place. 

‘But I realised: if your music had songs in it, it had a much greater reach. Not in business terms, but if a singer of, say, Amy’s calibre sings over this beat, it becomes so much bigger than just a beat. I can’t get rid of my clubbing past, not that I’d want to. But the linear nature of some of my music is definitely because of all those years spent clubbing and DJing, when a very simple idea can make the best club record. And it’s the same with songs – I’m after a really simple riff or really simple lyric or melody. And it’s about keeping that beautiful moment going for as long as you can.’

[links] =>

Fink Website

Facebook
Twitter
Soundcloud

[image_upload_id] => 19785 [label_id] => 13 [twitter_username] => Finkmusic [instagram_id] => [instagram_username] => [link] => [listed] => 1 [sortname] => Fink [created] => 2010-07-17 22:15:58 [modified] => 2014-08-11 14:09:15 [slug] => fink [fuga_id] => [description_clean] =>

Fin Greenall, who is the voice and heart behind Fink, often gets mistaken for other people. 

At the BMI Awards in the US, a ‘roomful of gangstas and playas’ were convinced the Cornwall-born, Bristol-raised Englishman was a lawyer, and not a songwriter picking up an ‘American Urban’ gong – one of three BMIs he received for his work with John Legend on the soul singer’s Evolver album.

In Berlin, clubbing capital of the world, they think he helps run a small minimal techno label. In certain London circles he’s known as the hardworking insider whose past roles at DefJam, Sony Music, Talkin’ Loud, and Source saw him work with a range of artists longer than the horizon. At the BBC, they imagine Fink as perhaps the only musician who has played both the Electric Proms and the actual Proms (was that really the same guy leading a 120-piece orchestra at the Royal Albert Hall in an ‘immense’ cover of Roy Ayers’ Everybody Loves The Sunshine?). 

In record company circles, he’s the producer who worked on the first demos by Amy Winehouse and the writer who’s been crafting hooks for Professor Green. In big-room booths around the world, he’s the internationally-renowned DJ and Ninja Tune stalwart who finally hung up his Sennheisers with a valedictory set at London’s Fabric in 2003. ‘My skillset just seemed so old compared to these guys that could DJ for six hours without one high-hat out of place using Ableton or something,’ he notes admiringly.

Who is Fin Greenall? All of the above. 

Yes, the now-Brighton-based musician acknowledges, he has done – does do – all of those things. ‘But none of that is as important as how I feel when I write songs like "Fear is Like Fire" and "Perfect Darkness". The Fink thing is my main thing.’

As a kid, the one thing of his dad’s that Fin Greenall wasn’t allowed to touch was the old Martin acoustic guitar. ‘It was his one possession where he said, “everything in this house is owned by everybody – apart from that.”’ But with age – and the burgeoning of his son’s skills as a player – came a relaxation of the exclusion zone: Greenall plays the Martin on the punchy, Jeff Buckley-covering-Radiohead-esque "Fear Is Like Fire". It’s sure to become a live stand-out on Fink’s upcoming, 18-month-long world tour. ‘It’s all about trying to look at fear and be optimistic – you can be really negative or fucking embrace it and use it. 

‘The great thing about growing up in a house where music is a big factor,’ he continues, ‘was the fact that music being part of your life was a perfectly natural thing.’ 

Music, it seems, became more than that: it was Greenall’s life. He hoovered up the sounds he heard on John Peel: ‘The Cure, The Smiths, The Orb, African music, Japanese hardcore’. He embraced skateboarding, the music and the fashion – ‘it was an awesome way to grow your own culture’. At university in Leeds, electronic and dance music became everything. 

‘It was definitely about wanting to be part of a revolution that I could call my own,’ he recalls. ‘A couple of friends and I clubbed together our student loans and bought equipment to make ambient techno – we were really inspired by Aphex Twin and The Orb and Moby. We were amazed at how fucking easy it was to make ambient techno. It wasn’t easy to make good ambient techno,’ he laughs. ‘But it was easy enough to make techno good enough to get us signed after six months of mucking around at uni.’ 

The young techno warrior was messianic. 

‘I thought the song was dead, the chorus was dead, playing drums and guitar and bass was so old-school and outdated and why would you want to do that? Dylan did that 50 years ago! We should be part of this new revolution, instrumentalism, acid house, rave culture, techno – this stuff is a brave new avant-garde frontier and you should be involved.’ 

His ardour and his skills saw Greenall become part of the Ninja Tune family – first signed on the back of a cassette-tape demo - as artist, DJ, writer, producer, and remixer. 

‘Brilliant times,’ he sighs nostalgically. ‘Sometimes you’d just have to pinch yourself. Then, other times, you wake up in Bratislava on a Tuesday morning and you’re reminded that there is hard work to all of this.’ All that crate-digging wasn’t all it’s cracked up to be either: ‘You can’t be shit!’ Greenall grins. ‘And because of the community that Ninja has worldwide, if you are shit everybody knows about it the next day. Eight years of DJing have given me an obscenely huge record collection. I just cleared out the breaks section – four crates of twelves that were total pony!’ 

So the wheels of steel started to fall off. 

‘It wasn’t until I’d run that right the way through to its natural conclusion – I’m an international DJ on the biggest DJ label in the world – that I thought: I’m kinda over it. And it was actually working with a young artist straight out of school called Amy Winehouse that inspired me to go, “wow, songs are great! Now I get how difficult it is, and how much talent there is involved in this. It’s more of a challenge than clubbing.”’ 

Greenall melted down his turntables and recast them as a guitar and a stool. Metaphorically speaking. His parents were pleased. ‘My career only made sense to them when I picked up a guitar and started to sing,’ he says. ‘All of a sudden I was doing music, I wasn’t just mucking around. But in my rave days, DJing techno and breaks, they didn’t get that at all. That’s probably why I did it in the first place. 

‘But I realised: if your music had songs in it, it had a much greater reach. Not in business terms, but if a singer of, say, Amy’s calibre sings over this beat, it becomes so much bigger than just a beat. I can’t get rid of my clubbing past, not that I’d want to. But the linear nature of some of my music is definitely because of all those years spent clubbing and DJing, when a very simple idea can make the best club record. And it’s the same with songs – I’m after a really simple riff or really simple lyric or melody. And it’s about keeping that beautiful moment going for as long as you can.’

[links_clean] =>

Fink Website

Facebook
Twitter
Soundcloud

[counter_player] => [counter_biog] => ) ) ) [16] => Array ( [Event] => Array ( [id] => 13734 [date] => 2015-02-06 [artist] => Seven Davis Jr [city] => Liverpool [state] => [country] => GB [venue] => Abandon Silence [promoter] => [description] => [ticket_url] => http://www.songkick.com/concerts/22629633-seven-davis-jr-at-abandon-silence [image_upload_id] => 20439 [created] => 2015-01-13 12:29:23 [modified] => 2015-01-27 22:24:36 [year_slug] => 2015 [month_slug] => feb [day_slug] => 6 [slug] => seven-davis-jr-liverpool-abandon-silence [description_clean] => [products_count] => 0 [hidden] => 0 [soldout] => 0 ) [Image] => Array ( [id] => 20439 [media_type] => image [artist] => Seven Davis Jr [title] => Press Photo 2015 [credits] => [buy_link] => [filename] => images/seven-davis-jr/Seven-Davis-Jr-CREDIT-ERIC-COLEMAN.jpg [checksum] => d994282fe5aeff900d9f35c089ae940d [mime_type] => image/jpeg [size] => 9509156 [external_url] => [image_upload_id] => [first_track_id] => [first_release_id] => [listed] => 0 [active] => 0 [processed] => 1 [artist_slug] => seven-davis-jr [slug] => press-photo-2015 [created] => 2015-01-13 11:59:18 [modified] => 2015-01-13 12:00:05 [embed] => ) [Country] => Array ( [id] => 208 [name] => United Kingdom [longname] => United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland [numcode] => 826 [iso] => GB [iso3] => GBR [currency] => GBP [active] => 1 [parent_id] => 191 [lft] => 413 [rght] => 414 [level] => 2 ) [Product] => Array ( ) [Artist] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => 219 [name] => Seven Davis Jr [description] =>

Photo: Eric Coleman

Residing in Los Angeles, California, Seven Davis Jr was raised on the classics – from Michael Jackson and Prince to Stevie Wonder and Aretha Franklin. His early self-released output, however, was more closely aligned to the city’s vibrant left-leaning electronic underground. The past 18 months have seen Seven skip from a retrospective EP via Kutmah’s IZWID imprint to 12"s with Must Have Records, Classic, Ten Thousand Yen (alongside Doc Daneeka) and Funkineven’s Apron Records on a Peven Everett vs. Sa-Ra vs. Derrick Carter flex.

[links] => [image_upload_id] => 20439 [label_id] => 1 [twitter_username] => sevendavisjr [instagram_id] => [instagram_username] => [link] => [listed] => 1 [sortname] => Seven Davis Jr [created] => 2014-10-31 15:10:11 [modified] => 2015-01-13 14:12:30 [slug] => seven-davis-jr [fuga_id] => [description_clean] =>

Photo: Eric Coleman

Residing in Los Angeles, California, Seven Davis Jr was raised on the classics – from Michael Jackson and Prince to Stevie Wonder and Aretha Franklin. His early self-released output, however, was more closely aligned to the city’s vibrant left-leaning electronic underground. The past 18 months have seen Seven skip from a retrospective EP via Kutmah’s IZWID imprint to 12"s with Must Have Records, Classic, Ten Thousand Yen (alongside Doc Daneeka) and Funkineven’s Apron Records on a Peven Everett vs. Sa-Ra vs. Derrick Carter flex.

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Busdriver is fixed as one of LA music’s most dynamic indie artist. From his years as a cyher phenom at Project Blowed to his years as a recording artist on Epitaph to his current role as co-head of Hellfyre Club, Busdriver has always challenged rap in the most particular and thoughful of ways.

BD’s first record, Memoirs of the Elephantman, was self released thru Afterlife records (a Project Blowed subcrew at the time)in 1999. Not until his second self-released record, Temporary Forever, came out in 2002 did Busdriver step on the world stage. Sleeper hit "Imaginary Places" turned him into one of many beacons of left-leaning hip-hop at the moment. During this time he was also emceeing at the Hiphop/Drum’n’bass night weekly Concrete Jungle with Daddy Kev, Myka 9, edit and DJ Hive.

After the new success of Temporary Forever, Busdriver signed with Mush records to do a collaborative album with beat/production guru Daedelus and quirky rap talent Radioinactive in 2003. The project was called ‘The Weather’. Their album toyed with daring disjointed production and dexterous rap writing in a way that Busdriver hadn’t in the past. The project amassed a small cult following all its own and aligned Driver’s taste with the output of LA’s electronic music scene.

In 2004, Busdriver began his relationship with Big Dada by releasing with them the Daddy Kev-produced mini-LP, Cosmic Cleavage. This was followed by Busdriver’s official 3rd album, Fear of a Black Tangent, released via Big Dada in the EU and on Mush in the US.

Busdriver’s label dealings grew outside of the rap arena in 2007 when he signed to indie-punk mega-label Epitaph and eventually, it’s more indie-music driven sister label, Anti-. Through them he released RoadKillOvercoat in 2007 and Jhellibeam in 2009. Both albums featured production from DJ Nobody, Nosaj Thing, Free the Robots and Boom Bip. During these years, rap producer culture was in flux in LA and the newly founded Low End Theory began gaining momentum. Producer eDIT (who becomes the head of Glitch Mob) featured Busdriver on "Crunk De Gaulle" (also featuring TTC) off his Alpha Pup debut, Certified Air Raid Material.

Computer Cooties came out in 2010 after BD parted with Anti-. It was a free mixtape featuring collaborations with Flying Lotus, Anti-Pop Consortium, Sister Crayon, Daedelus and Open Mike Eagle. He followed this by joining Hellfyre Club and forming Flash Bang Grenada, a two-man group made of Nocando (founder of Hellfyre Club and original resident of Low End Theory) and himself, created solely to let their musings on popular rap themes run amok. They released their debut 10 Haters in 2011.

In 2012, BD released Beaus$Eros through Fake Four. The album was produced entirely by Loden and had features from Cocorosie and Mike Ladd. It was a departure from rap writing into microclimates of experimental pop but then completely not also. The record was coupled with Regan Farquhar aka Busdriver(Driver) fronting an progressive power pop outfit briefly called Physiccal Forms.

That same year Driver released Arguments with Dreams, an EP marking a return to Big Dada. It was mostly self-produced with stand-out appearances from Das Racist on “Firehydrant” and HFC members Nocando and Mike Eagle on “Wernor Herzog”.

In 2013, Driver helmed and oversaw the production of Dorner Vs. Tookie, the joint mixtape featuring efforts from all the members of Hellfyre Club (Nocando, Busdriver, Open Mike Eagle, milo, Rheteric Ramirez, Kail, VerBS, Taurus Scott, The Kleerz). While doing this Busdriver completed his 8th proper studio album, Perfect Hair. The album features production from Mono/Poly, Jeremiah Jae, Great Dane, Kenny Segal and Riley Lake with guest performances from Danny Brown, Aesop Rock and Mike Eagle. A follow up mixtape from Hellfyre Club in collaboration with producer collective Team Supreme is planned for 2014. But it is only it is pre-production stages now.

More recently Driver has done collaborations with Modeselektor, Son Lux, Latyrx, Kool AD, Lapalux, Sonnymoon, P.O.S, and others on various albums.

[links] =>

Facebook
Twitter
SoundCloud
Dorner Vs. Tookie Mixtape

[image_upload_id] => 19576 [label_id] => 2 [twitter_username] => Busdriverr [instagram_id] => 7648195 [instagram_username] => busdriverr [link] => [listed] => 1 [sortname] => Busdriver [created] => 2010-07-17 22:15:58 [modified] => 2014-06-16 17:41:15 [slug] => busdriver [fuga_id] => [description_clean] =>

Busdriver is fixed as one of LA music’s most dynamic indie artist. From his years as a cyher phenom at Project Blowed to his years as a recording artist on Epitaph to his current role as co-head of Hellfyre Club, Busdriver has always challenged rap in the most particular and thoughful of ways.

BD’s first record, Memoirs of the Elephantman, was self released thru Afterlife records (a Project Blowed subcrew at the time)in 1999. Not until his second self-released record, Temporary Forever, came out in 2002 did Busdriver step on the world stage. Sleeper hit "Imaginary Places" turned him into one of many beacons of left-leaning hip-hop at the moment. During this time he was also emceeing at the Hiphop/Drum’n’bass night weekly Concrete Jungle with Daddy Kev, Myka 9, edit and DJ Hive.

After the new success of Temporary Forever, Busdriver signed with Mush records to do a collaborative album with beat/production guru Daedelus and quirky rap talent Radioinactive in 2003. The project was called ‘The Weather’. Their album toyed with daring disjointed production and dexterous rap writing in a way that Busdriver hadn’t in the past. The project amassed a small cult following all its own and aligned Driver’s taste with the output of LA’s electronic music scene.

In 2004, Busdriver began his relationship with Big Dada by releasing with them the Daddy Kev-produced mini-LP, Cosmic Cleavage. This was followed by Busdriver’s official 3rd album, Fear of a Black Tangent, released via Big Dada in the EU and on Mush in the US.

Busdriver’s label dealings grew outside of the rap arena in 2007 when he signed to indie-punk mega-label Epitaph and eventually, it’s more indie-music driven sister label, Anti-. Through them he released RoadKillOvercoat in 2007 and Jhellibeam in 2009. Both albums featured production from DJ Nobody, Nosaj Thing, Free the Robots and Boom Bip. During these years, rap producer culture was in flux in LA and the newly founded Low End Theory began gaining momentum. Producer eDIT (who becomes the head of Glitch Mob) featured Busdriver on "Crunk De Gaulle" (also featuring TTC) off his Alpha Pup debut, Certified Air Raid Material.

Computer Cooties came out in 2010 after BD parted with Anti-. It was a free mixtape featuring collaborations with Flying Lotus, Anti-Pop Consortium, Sister Crayon, Daedelus and Open Mike Eagle. He followed this by joining Hellfyre Club and forming Flash Bang Grenada, a two-man group made of Nocando (founder of Hellfyre Club and original resident of Low End Theory) and himself, created solely to let their musings on popular rap themes run amok. They released their debut 10 Haters in 2011.

In 2012, BD released Beaus$Eros through Fake Four. The album was produced entirely by Loden and had features from Cocorosie and Mike Ladd. It was a departure from rap writing into microclimates of experimental pop but then completely not also. The record was coupled with Regan Farquhar aka Busdriver(Driver) fronting an progressive power pop outfit briefly called Physiccal Forms.

That same year Driver released Arguments with Dreams, an EP marking a return to Big Dada. It was mostly self-produced with stand-out appearances from Das Racist on “Firehydrant” and HFC members Nocando and Mike Eagle on “Wernor Herzog”.

In 2013, Driver helmed and oversaw the production of Dorner Vs. Tookie, the joint mixtape featuring efforts from all the members of Hellfyre Club (Nocando, Busdriver, Open Mike Eagle, milo, Rheteric Ramirez, Kail, VerBS, Taurus Scott, The Kleerz). While doing this Busdriver completed his 8th proper studio album, Perfect Hair. The album features production from Mono/Poly, Jeremiah Jae, Great Dane, Kenny Segal and Riley Lake with guest performances from Danny Brown, Aesop Rock and Mike Eagle. A follow up mixtape from Hellfyre Club in collaboration with producer collective Team Supreme is planned for 2014. But it is only it is pre-production stages now.

More recently Driver has done collaborations with Modeselektor, Son Lux, Latyrx, Kool AD, Lapalux, Sonnymoon, P.O.S, and others on various albums.

[links_clean] =>

Facebook
Twitter
SoundCloud
Dorner Vs. Tookie Mixtape

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