Array ( [Event] => Array ( [id] => 13892 [date] => 2015-05-19 [artist] => Portico [city] => Ris Orangis [state] => [country] => FR [venue] => Le Plan 2 [promoter] => [description] => [ticket_url] => [image_upload_id] => 20575 [created] => 2015-02-04 12:04:14 [modified] => 2015-02-06 10:33:36 [year_slug] => 2015 [month_slug] => may [day_slug] => 19 [slug] => portico-ris-orangis-le-plan-2 [description_clean] => [products_count] => 0 [hidden] => 0 [soldout] => 0 ) [Image] => Array ( [id] => 20575 [media_type] => image [artist] => Portico [title] => 2015 tour [credits] => [buy_link] => [filename] => images/portico/Portico-tour-poster-lores.jpg [checksum] => 9a55be3183aa87da892ebc8fc13ae693 [mime_type] => image/jpeg [size] => 114003 [external_url] => [image_upload_id] => [first_track_id] => [first_release_id] => [listed] => 0 [active] => 1 [processed] => 1 [artist_slug] => portico [slug] => 2015-tour [created] => 2015-02-06 10:28:14 [modified] => 2015-02-06 10:28:15 [embed] => ) [Country] => Array ( [id] => 229 [name] => France [longname] => France [numcode] => 250 [iso] => FR [iso3] => FRA [currency] => EUR [active] => 1 [parent_id] => 226 [lft] => 455 [rght] => 456 [level] => 2 ) [Product] => Array ( ) [Artist] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => 213 [name] => Portico [description] =>

If the name PORTICO seems familiar, that’s probably understandable, as is the fact that the faces behind it may seem recognisable too. As Portico Quartet, Jack Wyllie, Duncan Bellamy, Milo Fitzpatrick and then member Nick Mulvey released their first album together – the Mercury Music Prize nominated Knee-Deep In The North Sea – back in 2007, but things around a group change, especially when you start out so young, and by the time Mulvey’s successor, Keir Vine, had also moved on, the three London based musicians realised that they were no longer satisfied by the music they were making. They had, as they put it, “gone as far as they could”. It was early 2013 - they’d all grown up, and were no longer a quartet either. This time, they decided, it was their turn to make the changes.

LIVING FIELDS is the debut album by PORTICO, and if the people – and the name they employ – seem familiar, rest assured that the music they make is not. Gone are the hang drum, the saxophone and the drum kit with which they first caught the world’s attention. What emerges instead is – put simply – startling. The people are the same, but the band’s been transformed. PORTICO and LIVING FIELDS are the proof, and one listen makes it clear that this is almost entirely new territory for Fitzpatrick, Wyllie and Bellamy. Sparse, immersive and spectral, it’s an album that is at once substantial and yet insubstantial, capable of absorbing one into an intricate sonic world whose fundamental components seem paradoxically intangible.

The temptation might be to define LIVING FIELDS as an “electronic” album. As Bellamy points out, however, plenty of its components come from an analogue world. “I don't think we feel that it's overtly 'electronic',” he elaborates, “in the way that, say, Aphex Twin or Autechre are defined by the association. For starters, there's piano, guitar and bass on the record – though we usually try and treat them in an interesting way – as well as field recordings. For example, in ‘Void’ there’s a recording of a very large, old ship being torn apart, which ties into the concepts of decay and disintegration which run through the album. But a lot of the sounds are electronic and come from synthesisers, samplers or drum machines. Even most of the more acoustic sounds are mediated by effects or computers somehow.”

As it happens, the process of change began some time ago, and arguably, Mulvey’s departure from the ranks in 2011 was connected to this gradual metamorphosis. As Bellamy admits, “We were getting interested in electronics, and finding more ways we could expand the band’s sound, and as we were getting more enthusiastic, Nick was beginning to feel like his role was literally getting drowned out, and was becoming more interested in his own music”.

By late 2012, the band had reached a crossroads. The three of them, plus Vine, had experimented with new approaches, as well as vocalists, on that year’s eponymous album, but afterwards they found themselves in musical disarray. As Fitzpatrick recalls, “We just had this massive existential crisis, where we were like, I don’t think we want to do this any more, do we? No one seemed to be very enthusiastic about that current state of the band.” Wyllie underlines this: “It was a good time to take a step back, to really examine what we were collectively willing to do, and what we were interested in.”

In trying to rediscover what it was that had first brought them together, the musicians learned one crucial lesson: if they could identify their initial chemistry, then they could salvage the very essence of their creative energy. “That's the point we decided to draw a line under the old Portico Quartet,” Bellamy says, “and just do something that was really different and new, and a challenge for us again. It worked, because we suddenly felt way more invigorated and passionate about making music together again.”Portico Quartet’, they understood at last, was merely the name of a project on which they’d collaborated. ‘PORTICO’ would be another.

This realisation, and the freedom that it allowed them, enabled the trio to reinvent themselves. Conscious that they were simultaneously the same band, and yet a new one, they chose to drop the ‘Quartet’ from their name as a symbol of their new beginnings, but to keep ‘Portico’ as, in Fitzpatrick’s words, “an acknowledgement that we are the same three people, with a certain chemistry, looking for the same things.” What followed was, in a sense, a return to their roots: though tracks were still built up using loops and individual sections, they embarked on more structured material, just as they had on their debut. “One of the things we were interested in, especially in the early stuff, was song writing,” Wyllie explains, “but by the third album we’d started to explore textures.” As a rejuvenated unit, PORTICO now incorporate both these elements into their music, with the likes of the title track, "101", "Colour Fading" and "Bright Luck" all strikingly melodic but elaborately arranged. “In the past,” Bellamy points out, “we had always written all together, playing through the compositions and arrangements with all our instruments. Once we were finished we would go to a studio to record it all live, and then do overdubs. This time we just invested in some gear for our studio and started recording directly onto the computer. If someone had an idea, we would put it down straight away, and that could be the finished track. It was quite liberating because suddenly we had way more control of the recording process.”

What subsequently materialised is, as they themselves describe it, “music which moves forward towards distant places while offering rare intimacy, arriving somewhere between structured pop songs and a disintegrating ambience, a unique blend of the sublunary and the celestial.” They were inspired by leftfield artists like William Basinski and Tim Hecker – with whose music theirs shares what Wyllie describes as “this feeling of something breaking up and falling apart” – and a crucial moment in their development came when they were asked by the Royal Academy of Art to write music for an exhibition about space and architecture in early 2014. “That opened up a new sound world,” Fitzpatrick says. “ ‘Void’ is actually from that session, and ‘Dissolution’ too.”

Aware that they were ready to work with vocalists, they sought suitable candidates, and eventually alighted on three singers with whom they already had a connection, and whose distinctive voices matched what they had in mind. The first part of the puzzle was Alt-J’s Joe Newman: he’d grown up two doors down from Wyllie in Southampton, where Fitzpatrick was also raised, and they’d always been mutual fans of each other’s music. His initial contribution, "101", was the proof PORTICO needed that their musical gamble had paid off, and he soon delivered further tracks, "Brittle" and "Atacama". “He’s obviously a really talented songwriter,” Wyllie states. “He just kept coming out with these great melodies, really quickly too. It helps collaborating with people if you’ve got a personal connection.” It was the personal connection that seemed vital: Old friend, and former Portico house mate, Jamie Woon, also came on board for the epic "Memory Of Newness": They’d always wanted to work together in the past, but only now did the material suit the concept. Woon, in turn, had introduced the band to Jono McCleery, One of the band’s favourite singers, he had opened for Portico Quartet at the ICA a few years earlier and, as with Jamie and Joe, the collaboration flowed naturally. The songs on which they would go on to collaborate were so successful that McCleery was invited to join the band to help play the new material live, and the album takes its title from one of their collaborations, the darkly hypnotic Living Fields.

From the outset, PORTICO insisted that LIVING FIELDS maintain an overarching concept, rather than being, as Wyllie puts it, “a collection of songs with totally disparate, unrelated lyrics”. Each of the band’s members had been forced to confront various diverse private issues in the preceding period of time, and they wanted the record to remain personal to them, despite these outside collaborators. Their search for a method of articulating the relevant themes included work by Herman Hesse and Philip Larkin, but eventually they found the touchstone they were searching for in the shape of an award-winning Chilean documentary, Nostalgia For The Light.

The film crystallised many of the topics that they’d been addressing amongst themselves – the search for identity, the significance of memory, questions about life and death, the way that each answer we uncover can provoke further mysteries – and they asked McCleery, Woon and Newman to view it before they wrote their lyrics. “It wasn’t like we watched it and said, Let’s make an album about that,” Wyllie clarifies. “It was, Let’s find something that we can use to inspire some singers that connects to what we’re thinking.” It was the final detail in the making of an extraordinary, enigmatic but unified record, and, just as some of the sounds seem to veer in and out of focus, so words and phrases drift through a haze of reverb-drenched pianos, synth arpeggios, subterranean bass and ambient noise, all punctured by illuminated shards of programmed and live drums.

The results are unlike anything else that’s come before and, for all the band know, may even be unlike anything they do in the future. As Fitzpatrick concludes, “This is just one album. Who knows what the next one’s going to be like? We’re taking it one step at a time. What we’ve learned is that it’s really all about us three.”

Welcome, then, PORTICO and their LIVING FIELDS: a bold, adventurous step into the unknown that bravely inspires as many questions as answers. As Hermann Hesse wrote in Stages, a poem from The Glass Bead Game that became one of the band’s maxims:

“Serenely they let us move to distant places, And let no sentiment of home detain us. The Cosmic Spirit seeks not to restrain us But lifts us stage by stage to wider spaces.”

[links] =>

porticomusic.co.uk
Facebook
Twitter
Instagram
SoundCloud

[image_upload_id] => 20561 [label_id] => 1 [twitter_username] => porticomusic [instagram_id] => 1308320561 [instagram_username] => porticomusic [link] => [listed] => 1 [sortname] => Portico [created] => 2014-09-23 15:38:15 [modified] => 2015-03-26 17:30:47 [slug] => portico [fuga_id] => [description_clean] =>

If the name PORTICO seems familiar, that’s probably understandable, as is the fact that the faces behind it may seem recognisable too. As Portico Quartet, Jack Wyllie, Duncan Bellamy, Milo Fitzpatrick and then member Nick Mulvey released their first album together – the Mercury Music Prize nominated Knee-Deep In The North Sea – back in 2007, but things around a group change, especially when you start out so young, and by the time Mulvey’s successor, Keir Vine, had also moved on, the three London based musicians realised that they were no longer satisfied by the music they were making. They had, as they put it, “gone as far as they could”. It was early 2013 - they’d all grown up, and were no longer a quartet either. This time, they decided, it was their turn to make the changes.

LIVING FIELDS is the debut album by PORTICO, and if the people – and the name they employ – seem familiar, rest assured that the music they make is not. Gone are the hang drum, the saxophone and the drum kit with which they first caught the world’s attention. What emerges instead is – put simply – startling. The people are the same, but the band’s been transformed. PORTICO and LIVING FIELDS are the proof, and one listen makes it clear that this is almost entirely new territory for Fitzpatrick, Wyllie and Bellamy. Sparse, immersive and spectral, it’s an album that is at once substantial and yet insubstantial, capable of absorbing one into an intricate sonic world whose fundamental components seem paradoxically intangible.

The temptation might be to define LIVING FIELDS as an “electronic” album. As Bellamy points out, however, plenty of its components come from an analogue world. “I don't think we feel that it's overtly 'electronic',” he elaborates, “in the way that, say, Aphex Twin or Autechre are defined by the association. For starters, there's piano, guitar and bass on the record – though we usually try and treat them in an interesting way – as well as field recordings. For example, in ‘Void’ there’s a recording of a very large, old ship being torn apart, which ties into the concepts of decay and disintegration which run through the album. But a lot of the sounds are electronic and come from synthesisers, samplers or drum machines. Even most of the more acoustic sounds are mediated by effects or computers somehow.”

As it happens, the process of change began some time ago, and arguably, Mulvey’s departure from the ranks in 2011 was connected to this gradual metamorphosis. As Bellamy admits, “We were getting interested in electronics, and finding more ways we could expand the band’s sound, and as we were getting more enthusiastic, Nick was beginning to feel like his role was literally getting drowned out, and was becoming more interested in his own music”.

By late 2012, the band had reached a crossroads. The three of them, plus Vine, had experimented with new approaches, as well as vocalists, on that year’s eponymous album, but afterwards they found themselves in musical disarray. As Fitzpatrick recalls, “We just had this massive existential crisis, where we were like, I don’t think we want to do this any more, do we? No one seemed to be very enthusiastic about that current state of the band.” Wyllie underlines this: “It was a good time to take a step back, to really examine what we were collectively willing to do, and what we were interested in.”

In trying to rediscover what it was that had first brought them together, the musicians learned one crucial lesson: if they could identify their initial chemistry, then they could salvage the very essence of their creative energy. “That's the point we decided to draw a line under the old Portico Quartet,” Bellamy says, “and just do something that was really different and new, and a challenge for us again. It worked, because we suddenly felt way more invigorated and passionate about making music together again.”Portico Quartet’, they understood at last, was merely the name of a project on which they’d collaborated. ‘PORTICO’ would be another.

This realisation, and the freedom that it allowed them, enabled the trio to reinvent themselves. Conscious that they were simultaneously the same band, and yet a new one, they chose to drop the ‘Quartet’ from their name as a symbol of their new beginnings, but to keep ‘Portico’ as, in Fitzpatrick’s words, “an acknowledgement that we are the same three people, with a certain chemistry, looking for the same things.” What followed was, in a sense, a return to their roots: though tracks were still built up using loops and individual sections, they embarked on more structured material, just as they had on their debut. “One of the things we were interested in, especially in the early stuff, was song writing,” Wyllie explains, “but by the third album we’d started to explore textures.” As a rejuvenated unit, PORTICO now incorporate both these elements into their music, with the likes of the title track, "101", "Colour Fading" and "Bright Luck" all strikingly melodic but elaborately arranged. “In the past,” Bellamy points out, “we had always written all together, playing through the compositions and arrangements with all our instruments. Once we were finished we would go to a studio to record it all live, and then do overdubs. This time we just invested in some gear for our studio and started recording directly onto the computer. If someone had an idea, we would put it down straight away, and that could be the finished track. It was quite liberating because suddenly we had way more control of the recording process.”

What subsequently materialised is, as they themselves describe it, “music which moves forward towards distant places while offering rare intimacy, arriving somewhere between structured pop songs and a disintegrating ambience, a unique blend of the sublunary and the celestial.” They were inspired by leftfield artists like William Basinski and Tim Hecker – with whose music theirs shares what Wyllie describes as “this feeling of something breaking up and falling apart” – and a crucial moment in their development came when they were asked by the Royal Academy of Art to write music for an exhibition about space and architecture in early 2014. “That opened up a new sound world,” Fitzpatrick says. “ ‘Void’ is actually from that session, and ‘Dissolution’ too.”

Aware that they were ready to work with vocalists, they sought suitable candidates, and eventually alighted on three singers with whom they already had a connection, and whose distinctive voices matched what they had in mind. The first part of the puzzle was Alt-J’s Joe Newman: he’d grown up two doors down from Wyllie in Southampton, where Fitzpatrick was also raised, and they’d always been mutual fans of each other’s music. His initial contribution, "101", was the proof PORTICO needed that their musical gamble had paid off, and he soon delivered further tracks, "Brittle" and "Atacama". “He’s obviously a really talented songwriter,” Wyllie states. “He just kept coming out with these great melodies, really quickly too. It helps collaborating with people if you’ve got a personal connection.” It was the personal connection that seemed vital: Old friend, and former Portico house mate, Jamie Woon, also came on board for the epic "Memory Of Newness": They’d always wanted to work together in the past, but only now did the material suit the concept. Woon, in turn, had introduced the band to Jono McCleery, One of the band’s favourite singers, he had opened for Portico Quartet at the ICA a few years earlier and, as with Jamie and Joe, the collaboration flowed naturally. The songs on which they would go on to collaborate were so successful that McCleery was invited to join the band to help play the new material live, and the album takes its title from one of their collaborations, the darkly hypnotic Living Fields.

From the outset, PORTICO insisted that LIVING FIELDS maintain an overarching concept, rather than being, as Wyllie puts it, “a collection of songs with totally disparate, unrelated lyrics”. Each of the band’s members had been forced to confront various diverse private issues in the preceding period of time, and they wanted the record to remain personal to them, despite these outside collaborators. Their search for a method of articulating the relevant themes included work by Herman Hesse and Philip Larkin, but eventually they found the touchstone they were searching for in the shape of an award-winning Chilean documentary, Nostalgia For The Light.

The film crystallised many of the topics that they’d been addressing amongst themselves – the search for identity, the significance of memory, questions about life and death, the way that each answer we uncover can provoke further mysteries – and they asked McCleery, Woon and Newman to view it before they wrote their lyrics. “It wasn’t like we watched it and said, Let’s make an album about that,” Wyllie clarifies. “It was, Let’s find something that we can use to inspire some singers that connects to what we’re thinking.” It was the final detail in the making of an extraordinary, enigmatic but unified record, and, just as some of the sounds seem to veer in and out of focus, so words and phrases drift through a haze of reverb-drenched pianos, synth arpeggios, subterranean bass and ambient noise, all punctured by illuminated shards of programmed and live drums.

The results are unlike anything else that’s come before and, for all the band know, may even be unlike anything they do in the future. As Fitzpatrick concludes, “This is just one album. Who knows what the next one’s going to be like? We’re taking it one step at a time. What we’ve learned is that it’s really all about us three.”

Welcome, then, PORTICO and their LIVING FIELDS: a bold, adventurous step into the unknown that bravely inspires as many questions as answers. As Hermann Hesse wrote in Stages, a poem from The Glass Bead Game that became one of the band’s maxims:

“Serenely they let us move to distant places, And let no sentiment of home detain us. The Cosmic Spirit seeks not to restrain us But lifts us stage by stage to wider spaces.”

[links_clean] =>

porticomusic.co.uk
Facebook
Twitter
Instagram
SoundCloud

[counter_player] => [counter_biog] => [tracking] => [conversions] => [hide_preorder] => 0 [hide_tracks] => 0 [hide_buy] => 0 ) ) ) [1] => Array ( [Event] => Array ( [id] => 13679 [date] => 2015-05-20 [artist] => Young Fathers [city] => Glasgow [state] => [country] => GB [venue] => Glasgow Art School [promoter] => [description] => [ticket_url] => http://www.synergyconcerts.com/listings-tickets/events/20-may-15-young-fathers--the-art-school/ [image_upload_id] => 20364 [created] => 2014-12-11 16:45:50 [modified] => 2014-12-11 16:48:17 [year_slug] => 2015 [month_slug] => may [day_slug] => 20 [slug] => young-fathers-glasgow-glasgow-art-school [description_clean] => [products_count] => 0 [hidden] => 0 [soldout] => 0 ) [Image] => Array ( [id] => 20364 [media_type] => image [artist] => Young Fathers [title] => Young Fathers Press Shot 2014 [credits] => [buy_link] => [filename] => images/young-fathers/timspicoct1.jpg [checksum] => d16561a1f0ef8f6ecbf82b02a6bdc0ad [mime_type] => image/jpeg [size] => 151449 [external_url] => [image_upload_id] => [first_track_id] => [first_release_id] => [listed] => 0 [active] => 1 [processed] => 1 [artist_slug] => young-fathers [slug] => young-fathers-press-shot-2014 [created] => 2014-12-05 10:51:10 [modified] => 2014-12-05 10:51:12 [embed] => ) [Country] => Array ( [id] => 208 [name] => United Kingdom [longname] => United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland [numcode] => 826 [iso] => GB [iso3] => GBR [currency] => GBP [active] => 1 [parent_id] => 191 [lft] => 413 [rght] => 414 [level] => 2 ) [Product] => Array ( ) [Artist] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => 198 [name] => Young Fathers [description] =>

Young Fathers were christened in 2008, named after the fact that all three members were named for their fathers..

They are:

‘G’ Hastings, from Drylaw, Edinburgh, Alloysious Massaquoi, originally from Liberia via Ghana and Kayus Bankole, born in Edinburgh to Nigerian parents but partially raised in Maryland in the USA, all 27 years old. Their live shows are complimented by Steven Morrison (drums & DJ) and Lauren Holt (AKA LAWholt - vocals).

The group formed after meeting at an under-16s hiphop night at the infamous Bongo Club in Edinburgh when they were all 14 years old. Almost immediately they started writing and recording together, initially on an old karoake machine plugged into a cheap cassette recorderat G’s parents house.

After going through various guises over several years and after hooking up with a local production company, they eventually settled on the name Young Fathers and recorded their first album with Tim Brinkhurst (AKA London) as producer. The recordings included their first single, Straight Back On It, which was given a limited release in 2009 and was received well enough to get them a couple of TV appearances, plays on BBC radio, some festival dates and the support slots with Simian Mobile Disco and Esser on UK tours.

Straight Back On It, a bang-on-the-money pop song built around Afrika Bambaataa’s reworking of Kraftwerk, was indicative of the rest of the album, Inconceivable Child… Conceived, in as much as the album was a state of the art teenage pop collection. Unfortunately the album was never released; however, another single, separately recorded, Automatic, was given a limited online release, but failed to have much impact.

In 2011 and after writing and recording yet another, unreleased album, the group decided a radical change was necessary and they finally disconnected themselves from the local production company and took control of their destiny. Recording mini-album (or ‘mixtape’ as it was called) TAPE ONE in just over a week, finishing a track a day and having it available for download within two weeks of recording gave them renewed vigour. They quickly followed this up by recording TAPE TWO in a similar fashion. Los Angeles based alt-hiphop label, Anticon, discovered them online and within a few months had signed them up for a short deal that saw both TAPEs officially released in 2013.

The group, meanwhile, continued to tour, gathering an impressive reputation as a fierce live act. They played all over Europe and made their US debut at SxSW in Austin, Texas, in March 2013.

Following support from the BBC’s Zane Lowe and Lauren Laverne, and an appearance on influential USA talk show, Jimmy Kimmel in 2014, TAPE TWO won Scottish Album Of The Year (‘The SAY Award’) and this was followed by their latest album, DEAD, released this time on Anticon in the USA and Big Dada in the UK and Europe, receiving the Mercury Award for best album of 2014. They won as the underdogs and there was a minor controversy because they didn’t look particularly joyful at the presentation and because they refused to speak to some of the more right wing press covering the event.

Immediately after winning the Mercury, YFs travelled to Berlin where they continued making their new album in a freezing basement in a building near the railway yards. Returning to the more familiar (and warmer) basement studio in Edinburgh where most of their recordings were made, to finish the album, they ended 2014 by playing a home town show at Edinburgh’s Hogmanay New year’s Eve festival in front of several thousand people.

The new album, White Men Are Black Men Too, has been recorded at various places around the world, including Melbourne and London as well as Berlin and Edinburgh and features the Leith Congregational Choir on a couple of tracks.

Young Fathers played over 140 shows during 2014, including On Blackheath Festival (curated by Massive Attack). They toured the UK, large swathes of Europe and did a six week stint in the USA. The new year already has them booked to play even more. White Men Are Black Men Too is due for release in April.

[links] => [image_upload_id] => 20542 [label_id] => 2 [twitter_username] => youngfathers [instagram_id] => [instagram_username] => [link] => [listed] => 1 [sortname] => Young Fathers [created] => 2013-10-18 16:52:18 [modified] => 2015-03-31 14:34:35 [slug] => young-fathers [fuga_id] => [description_clean] =>

Young Fathers were christened in 2008, named after the fact that all three members were named for their fathers..

They are:

‘G’ Hastings, from Drylaw, Edinburgh, Alloysious Massaquoi, originally from Liberia via Ghana and Kayus Bankole, born in Edinburgh to Nigerian parents but partially raised in Maryland in the USA, all 27 years old. Their live shows are complimented by Steven Morrison (drums & DJ) and Lauren Holt (AKA LAWholt - vocals).

The group formed after meeting at an under-16s hiphop night at the infamous Bongo Club in Edinburgh when they were all 14 years old. Almost immediately they started writing and recording together, initially on an old karoake machine plugged into a cheap cassette recorderat G’s parents house.

After going through various guises over several years and after hooking up with a local production company, they eventually settled on the name Young Fathers and recorded their first album with Tim Brinkhurst (AKA London) as producer. The recordings included their first single, Straight Back On It, which was given a limited release in 2009 and was received well enough to get them a couple of TV appearances, plays on BBC radio, some festival dates and the support slots with Simian Mobile Disco and Esser on UK tours.

Straight Back On It, a bang-on-the-money pop song built around Afrika Bambaataa’s reworking of Kraftwerk, was indicative of the rest of the album, Inconceivable Child… Conceived, in as much as the album was a state of the art teenage pop collection. Unfortunately the album was never released; however, another single, separately recorded, Automatic, was given a limited online release, but failed to have much impact.

In 2011 and after writing and recording yet another, unreleased album, the group decided a radical change was necessary and they finally disconnected themselves from the local production company and took control of their destiny. Recording mini-album (or ‘mixtape’ as it was called) TAPE ONE in just over a week, finishing a track a day and having it available for download within two weeks of recording gave them renewed vigour. They quickly followed this up by recording TAPE TWO in a similar fashion. Los Angeles based alt-hiphop label, Anticon, discovered them online and within a few months had signed them up for a short deal that saw both TAPEs officially released in 2013.

The group, meanwhile, continued to tour, gathering an impressive reputation as a fierce live act. They played all over Europe and made their US debut at SxSW in Austin, Texas, in March 2013.

Following support from the BBC’s Zane Lowe and Lauren Laverne, and an appearance on influential USA talk show, Jimmy Kimmel in 2014, TAPE TWO won Scottish Album Of The Year (‘The SAY Award’) and this was followed by their latest album, DEAD, released this time on Anticon in the USA and Big Dada in the UK and Europe, receiving the Mercury Award for best album of 2014. They won as the underdogs and there was a minor controversy because they didn’t look particularly joyful at the presentation and because they refused to speak to some of the more right wing press covering the event.

Immediately after winning the Mercury, YFs travelled to Berlin where they continued making their new album in a freezing basement in a building near the railway yards. Returning to the more familiar (and warmer) basement studio in Edinburgh where most of their recordings were made, to finish the album, they ended 2014 by playing a home town show at Edinburgh’s Hogmanay New year’s Eve festival in front of several thousand people.

The new album, White Men Are Black Men Too, has been recorded at various places around the world, including Melbourne and London as well as Berlin and Edinburgh and features the Leith Congregational Choir on a couple of tracks.

Young Fathers played over 140 shows during 2014, including On Blackheath Festival (curated by Massive Attack). They toured the UK, large swathes of Europe and did a six week stint in the USA. The new year already has them booked to play even more. White Men Are Black Men Too is due for release in April.

[links_clean] => [counter_player] => [counter_biog] => [tracking] => [conversions] => [hide_preorder] => 0 [hide_tracks] => 0 [hide_buy] => 0 ) ) ) [2] => Array ( [Event] => Array ( [id] => 13893 [date] => 2015-05-20 [artist] => Portico [city] => Strasbourg [state] => [country] => FR [venue] => La Laiterie [promoter] => [description] => [ticket_url] => http://www.artefact.org/la-laiterie/programmation/portico-guest-presentes-par-artefact-prl-en-accord-avec-uni-t [image_upload_id] => 20575 [created] => 2015-02-04 12:05:03 [modified] => 2015-02-06 11:36:26 [year_slug] => 2015 [month_slug] => may [day_slug] => 20 [slug] => portico-strasbourg-la-laiterie [description_clean] => [products_count] => 0 [hidden] => 0 [soldout] => 0 ) [Image] => Array ( [id] => 20575 [media_type] => image [artist] => Portico [title] => 2015 tour [credits] => [buy_link] => [filename] => images/portico/Portico-tour-poster-lores.jpg [checksum] => 9a55be3183aa87da892ebc8fc13ae693 [mime_type] => image/jpeg [size] => 114003 [external_url] => [image_upload_id] => [first_track_id] => [first_release_id] => [listed] => 0 [active] => 1 [processed] => 1 [artist_slug] => portico [slug] => 2015-tour [created] => 2015-02-06 10:28:14 [modified] => 2015-02-06 10:28:15 [embed] => ) [Country] => Array ( [id] => 229 [name] => France [longname] => France [numcode] => 250 [iso] => FR [iso3] => FRA [currency] => EUR [active] => 1 [parent_id] => 226 [lft] => 455 [rght] => 456 [level] => 2 ) [Product] => Array ( ) [Artist] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => 213 [name] => Portico [description] =>

If the name PORTICO seems familiar, that’s probably understandable, as is the fact that the faces behind it may seem recognisable too. As Portico Quartet, Jack Wyllie, Duncan Bellamy, Milo Fitzpatrick and then member Nick Mulvey released their first album together – the Mercury Music Prize nominated Knee-Deep In The North Sea – back in 2007, but things around a group change, especially when you start out so young, and by the time Mulvey’s successor, Keir Vine, had also moved on, the three London based musicians realised that they were no longer satisfied by the music they were making. They had, as they put it, “gone as far as they could”. It was early 2013 - they’d all grown up, and were no longer a quartet either. This time, they decided, it was their turn to make the changes.

LIVING FIELDS is the debut album by PORTICO, and if the people – and the name they employ – seem familiar, rest assured that the music they make is not. Gone are the hang drum, the saxophone and the drum kit with which they first caught the world’s attention. What emerges instead is – put simply – startling. The people are the same, but the band’s been transformed. PORTICO and LIVING FIELDS are the proof, and one listen makes it clear that this is almost entirely new territory for Fitzpatrick, Wyllie and Bellamy. Sparse, immersive and spectral, it’s an album that is at once substantial and yet insubstantial, capable of absorbing one into an intricate sonic world whose fundamental components seem paradoxically intangible.

The temptation might be to define LIVING FIELDS as an “electronic” album. As Bellamy points out, however, plenty of its components come from an analogue world. “I don't think we feel that it's overtly 'electronic',” he elaborates, “in the way that, say, Aphex Twin or Autechre are defined by the association. For starters, there's piano, guitar and bass on the record – though we usually try and treat them in an interesting way – as well as field recordings. For example, in ‘Void’ there’s a recording of a very large, old ship being torn apart, which ties into the concepts of decay and disintegration which run through the album. But a lot of the sounds are electronic and come from synthesisers, samplers or drum machines. Even most of the more acoustic sounds are mediated by effects or computers somehow.”

As it happens, the process of change began some time ago, and arguably, Mulvey’s departure from the ranks in 2011 was connected to this gradual metamorphosis. As Bellamy admits, “We were getting interested in electronics, and finding more ways we could expand the band’s sound, and as we were getting more enthusiastic, Nick was beginning to feel like his role was literally getting drowned out, and was becoming more interested in his own music”.

By late 2012, the band had reached a crossroads. The three of them, plus Vine, had experimented with new approaches, as well as vocalists, on that year’s eponymous album, but afterwards they found themselves in musical disarray. As Fitzpatrick recalls, “We just had this massive existential crisis, where we were like, I don’t think we want to do this any more, do we? No one seemed to be very enthusiastic about that current state of the band.” Wyllie underlines this: “It was a good time to take a step back, to really examine what we were collectively willing to do, and what we were interested in.”

In trying to rediscover what it was that had first brought them together, the musicians learned one crucial lesson: if they could identify their initial chemistry, then they could salvage the very essence of their creative energy. “That's the point we decided to draw a line under the old Portico Quartet,” Bellamy says, “and just do something that was really different and new, and a challenge for us again. It worked, because we suddenly felt way more invigorated and passionate about making music together again.”Portico Quartet’, they understood at last, was merely the name of a project on which they’d collaborated. ‘PORTICO’ would be another.

This realisation, and the freedom that it allowed them, enabled the trio to reinvent themselves. Conscious that they were simultaneously the same band, and yet a new one, they chose to drop the ‘Quartet’ from their name as a symbol of their new beginnings, but to keep ‘Portico’ as, in Fitzpatrick’s words, “an acknowledgement that we are the same three people, with a certain chemistry, looking for the same things.” What followed was, in a sense, a return to their roots: though tracks were still built up using loops and individual sections, they embarked on more structured material, just as they had on their debut. “One of the things we were interested in, especially in the early stuff, was song writing,” Wyllie explains, “but by the third album we’d started to explore textures.” As a rejuvenated unit, PORTICO now incorporate both these elements into their music, with the likes of the title track, "101", "Colour Fading" and "Bright Luck" all strikingly melodic but elaborately arranged. “In the past,” Bellamy points out, “we had always written all together, playing through the compositions and arrangements with all our instruments. Once we were finished we would go to a studio to record it all live, and then do overdubs. This time we just invested in some gear for our studio and started recording directly onto the computer. If someone had an idea, we would put it down straight away, and that could be the finished track. It was quite liberating because suddenly we had way more control of the recording process.”

What subsequently materialised is, as they themselves describe it, “music which moves forward towards distant places while offering rare intimacy, arriving somewhere between structured pop songs and a disintegrating ambience, a unique blend of the sublunary and the celestial.” They were inspired by leftfield artists like William Basinski and Tim Hecker – with whose music theirs shares what Wyllie describes as “this feeling of something breaking up and falling apart” – and a crucial moment in their development came when they were asked by the Royal Academy of Art to write music for an exhibition about space and architecture in early 2014. “That opened up a new sound world,” Fitzpatrick says. “ ‘Void’ is actually from that session, and ‘Dissolution’ too.”

Aware that they were ready to work with vocalists, they sought suitable candidates, and eventually alighted on three singers with whom they already had a connection, and whose distinctive voices matched what they had in mind. The first part of the puzzle was Alt-J’s Joe Newman: he’d grown up two doors down from Wyllie in Southampton, where Fitzpatrick was also raised, and they’d always been mutual fans of each other’s music. His initial contribution, "101", was the proof PORTICO needed that their musical gamble had paid off, and he soon delivered further tracks, "Brittle" and "Atacama". “He’s obviously a really talented songwriter,” Wyllie states. “He just kept coming out with these great melodies, really quickly too. It helps collaborating with people if you’ve got a personal connection.” It was the personal connection that seemed vital: Old friend, and former Portico house mate, Jamie Woon, also came on board for the epic "Memory Of Newness": They’d always wanted to work together in the past, but only now did the material suit the concept. Woon, in turn, had introduced the band to Jono McCleery, One of the band’s favourite singers, he had opened for Portico Quartet at the ICA a few years earlier and, as with Jamie and Joe, the collaboration flowed naturally. The songs on which they would go on to collaborate were so successful that McCleery was invited to join the band to help play the new material live, and the album takes its title from one of their collaborations, the darkly hypnotic Living Fields.

From the outset, PORTICO insisted that LIVING FIELDS maintain an overarching concept, rather than being, as Wyllie puts it, “a collection of songs with totally disparate, unrelated lyrics”. Each of the band’s members had been forced to confront various diverse private issues in the preceding period of time, and they wanted the record to remain personal to them, despite these outside collaborators. Their search for a method of articulating the relevant themes included work by Herman Hesse and Philip Larkin, but eventually they found the touchstone they were searching for in the shape of an award-winning Chilean documentary, Nostalgia For The Light.

The film crystallised many of the topics that they’d been addressing amongst themselves – the search for identity, the significance of memory, questions about life and death, the way that each answer we uncover can provoke further mysteries – and they asked McCleery, Woon and Newman to view it before they wrote their lyrics. “It wasn’t like we watched it and said, Let’s make an album about that,” Wyllie clarifies. “It was, Let’s find something that we can use to inspire some singers that connects to what we’re thinking.” It was the final detail in the making of an extraordinary, enigmatic but unified record, and, just as some of the sounds seem to veer in and out of focus, so words and phrases drift through a haze of reverb-drenched pianos, synth arpeggios, subterranean bass and ambient noise, all punctured by illuminated shards of programmed and live drums.

The results are unlike anything else that’s come before and, for all the band know, may even be unlike anything they do in the future. As Fitzpatrick concludes, “This is just one album. Who knows what the next one’s going to be like? We’re taking it one step at a time. What we’ve learned is that it’s really all about us three.”

Welcome, then, PORTICO and their LIVING FIELDS: a bold, adventurous step into the unknown that bravely inspires as many questions as answers. As Hermann Hesse wrote in Stages, a poem from The Glass Bead Game that became one of the band’s maxims:

“Serenely they let us move to distant places, And let no sentiment of home detain us. The Cosmic Spirit seeks not to restrain us But lifts us stage by stage to wider spaces.”

[links] =>

porticomusic.co.uk
Facebook
Twitter
Instagram
SoundCloud

[image_upload_id] => 20561 [label_id] => 1 [twitter_username] => porticomusic [instagram_id] => 1308320561 [instagram_username] => porticomusic [link] => [listed] => 1 [sortname] => Portico [created] => 2014-09-23 15:38:15 [modified] => 2015-03-26 17:30:47 [slug] => portico [fuga_id] => [description_clean] =>

If the name PORTICO seems familiar, that’s probably understandable, as is the fact that the faces behind it may seem recognisable too. As Portico Quartet, Jack Wyllie, Duncan Bellamy, Milo Fitzpatrick and then member Nick Mulvey released their first album together – the Mercury Music Prize nominated Knee-Deep In The North Sea – back in 2007, but things around a group change, especially when you start out so young, and by the time Mulvey’s successor, Keir Vine, had also moved on, the three London based musicians realised that they were no longer satisfied by the music they were making. They had, as they put it, “gone as far as they could”. It was early 2013 - they’d all grown up, and were no longer a quartet either. This time, they decided, it was their turn to make the changes.

LIVING FIELDS is the debut album by PORTICO, and if the people – and the name they employ – seem familiar, rest assured that the music they make is not. Gone are the hang drum, the saxophone and the drum kit with which they first caught the world’s attention. What emerges instead is – put simply – startling. The people are the same, but the band’s been transformed. PORTICO and LIVING FIELDS are the proof, and one listen makes it clear that this is almost entirely new territory for Fitzpatrick, Wyllie and Bellamy. Sparse, immersive and spectral, it’s an album that is at once substantial and yet insubstantial, capable of absorbing one into an intricate sonic world whose fundamental components seem paradoxically intangible.

The temptation might be to define LIVING FIELDS as an “electronic” album. As Bellamy points out, however, plenty of its components come from an analogue world. “I don't think we feel that it's overtly 'electronic',” he elaborates, “in the way that, say, Aphex Twin or Autechre are defined by the association. For starters, there's piano, guitar and bass on the record – though we usually try and treat them in an interesting way – as well as field recordings. For example, in ‘Void’ there’s a recording of a very large, old ship being torn apart, which ties into the concepts of decay and disintegration which run through the album. But a lot of the sounds are electronic and come from synthesisers, samplers or drum machines. Even most of the more acoustic sounds are mediated by effects or computers somehow.”

As it happens, the process of change began some time ago, and arguably, Mulvey’s departure from the ranks in 2011 was connected to this gradual metamorphosis. As Bellamy admits, “We were getting interested in electronics, and finding more ways we could expand the band’s sound, and as we were getting more enthusiastic, Nick was beginning to feel like his role was literally getting drowned out, and was becoming more interested in his own music”.

By late 2012, the band had reached a crossroads. The three of them, plus Vine, had experimented with new approaches, as well as vocalists, on that year’s eponymous album, but afterwards they found themselves in musical disarray. As Fitzpatrick recalls, “We just had this massive existential crisis, where we were like, I don’t think we want to do this any more, do we? No one seemed to be very enthusiastic about that current state of the band.” Wyllie underlines this: “It was a good time to take a step back, to really examine what we were collectively willing to do, and what we were interested in.”

In trying to rediscover what it was that had first brought them together, the musicians learned one crucial lesson: if they could identify their initial chemistry, then they could salvage the very essence of their creative energy. “That's the point we decided to draw a line under the old Portico Quartet,” Bellamy says, “and just do something that was really different and new, and a challenge for us again. It worked, because we suddenly felt way more invigorated and passionate about making music together again.”Portico Quartet’, they understood at last, was merely the name of a project on which they’d collaborated. ‘PORTICO’ would be another.

This realisation, and the freedom that it allowed them, enabled the trio to reinvent themselves. Conscious that they were simultaneously the same band, and yet a new one, they chose to drop the ‘Quartet’ from their name as a symbol of their new beginnings, but to keep ‘Portico’ as, in Fitzpatrick’s words, “an acknowledgement that we are the same three people, with a certain chemistry, looking for the same things.” What followed was, in a sense, a return to their roots: though tracks were still built up using loops and individual sections, they embarked on more structured material, just as they had on their debut. “One of the things we were interested in, especially in the early stuff, was song writing,” Wyllie explains, “but by the third album we’d started to explore textures.” As a rejuvenated unit, PORTICO now incorporate both these elements into their music, with the likes of the title track, "101", "Colour Fading" and "Bright Luck" all strikingly melodic but elaborately arranged. “In the past,” Bellamy points out, “we had always written all together, playing through the compositions and arrangements with all our instruments. Once we were finished we would go to a studio to record it all live, and then do overdubs. This time we just invested in some gear for our studio and started recording directly onto the computer. If someone had an idea, we would put it down straight away, and that could be the finished track. It was quite liberating because suddenly we had way more control of the recording process.”

What subsequently materialised is, as they themselves describe it, “music which moves forward towards distant places while offering rare intimacy, arriving somewhere between structured pop songs and a disintegrating ambience, a unique blend of the sublunary and the celestial.” They were inspired by leftfield artists like William Basinski and Tim Hecker – with whose music theirs shares what Wyllie describes as “this feeling of something breaking up and falling apart” – and a crucial moment in their development came when they were asked by the Royal Academy of Art to write music for an exhibition about space and architecture in early 2014. “That opened up a new sound world,” Fitzpatrick says. “ ‘Void’ is actually from that session, and ‘Dissolution’ too.”

Aware that they were ready to work with vocalists, they sought suitable candidates, and eventually alighted on three singers with whom they already had a connection, and whose distinctive voices matched what they had in mind. The first part of the puzzle was Alt-J’s Joe Newman: he’d grown up two doors down from Wyllie in Southampton, where Fitzpatrick was also raised, and they’d always been mutual fans of each other’s music. His initial contribution, "101", was the proof PORTICO needed that their musical gamble had paid off, and he soon delivered further tracks, "Brittle" and "Atacama". “He’s obviously a really talented songwriter,” Wyllie states. “He just kept coming out with these great melodies, really quickly too. It helps collaborating with people if you’ve got a personal connection.” It was the personal connection that seemed vital: Old friend, and former Portico house mate, Jamie Woon, also came on board for the epic "Memory Of Newness": They’d always wanted to work together in the past, but only now did the material suit the concept. Woon, in turn, had introduced the band to Jono McCleery, One of the band’s favourite singers, he had opened for Portico Quartet at the ICA a few years earlier and, as with Jamie and Joe, the collaboration flowed naturally. The songs on which they would go on to collaborate were so successful that McCleery was invited to join the band to help play the new material live, and the album takes its title from one of their collaborations, the darkly hypnotic Living Fields.

From the outset, PORTICO insisted that LIVING FIELDS maintain an overarching concept, rather than being, as Wyllie puts it, “a collection of songs with totally disparate, unrelated lyrics”. Each of the band’s members had been forced to confront various diverse private issues in the preceding period of time, and they wanted the record to remain personal to them, despite these outside collaborators. Their search for a method of articulating the relevant themes included work by Herman Hesse and Philip Larkin, but eventually they found the touchstone they were searching for in the shape of an award-winning Chilean documentary, Nostalgia For The Light.

The film crystallised many of the topics that they’d been addressing amongst themselves – the search for identity, the significance of memory, questions about life and death, the way that each answer we uncover can provoke further mysteries – and they asked McCleery, Woon and Newman to view it before they wrote their lyrics. “It wasn’t like we watched it and said, Let’s make an album about that,” Wyllie clarifies. “It was, Let’s find something that we can use to inspire some singers that connects to what we’re thinking.” It was the final detail in the making of an extraordinary, enigmatic but unified record, and, just as some of the sounds seem to veer in and out of focus, so words and phrases drift through a haze of reverb-drenched pianos, synth arpeggios, subterranean bass and ambient noise, all punctured by illuminated shards of programmed and live drums.

The results are unlike anything else that’s come before and, for all the band know, may even be unlike anything they do in the future. As Fitzpatrick concludes, “This is just one album. Who knows what the next one’s going to be like? We’re taking it one step at a time. What we’ve learned is that it’s really all about us three.”

Welcome, then, PORTICO and their LIVING FIELDS: a bold, adventurous step into the unknown that bravely inspires as many questions as answers. As Hermann Hesse wrote in Stages, a poem from The Glass Bead Game that became one of the band’s maxims:

“Serenely they let us move to distant places, And let no sentiment of home detain us. The Cosmic Spirit seeks not to restrain us But lifts us stage by stage to wider spaces.”

[links_clean] =>

porticomusic.co.uk
Facebook
Twitter
Instagram
SoundCloud

[counter_player] => [counter_biog] => [tracking] => [conversions] => [hide_preorder] => 0 [hide_tracks] => 0 [hide_buy] => 0 ) ) ) [3] => Array ( [Event] => Array ( [id] => 13680 [date] => 2015-05-21 [artist] => Young Fathers [city] => Newcastle [state] => [country] => GB [venue] => Riverside Club [promoter] => [description] => [ticket_url] => http://www.seetickets.com/event/young-fathers/riverside/836893 [image_upload_id] => 20364 [created] => 2014-12-11 16:49:14 [modified] => 2014-12-15 11:47:44 [year_slug] => 2015 [month_slug] => may [day_slug] => 21 [slug] => young-fathers-newcastle-riverside-club [description_clean] => [products_count] => 0 [hidden] => 0 [soldout] => 0 ) [Image] => Array ( [id] => 20364 [media_type] => image [artist] => Young Fathers [title] => Young Fathers Press Shot 2014 [credits] => [buy_link] => [filename] => images/young-fathers/timspicoct1.jpg [checksum] => d16561a1f0ef8f6ecbf82b02a6bdc0ad [mime_type] => image/jpeg [size] => 151449 [external_url] => [image_upload_id] => [first_track_id] => [first_release_id] => [listed] => 0 [active] => 1 [processed] => 1 [artist_slug] => young-fathers [slug] => young-fathers-press-shot-2014 [created] => 2014-12-05 10:51:10 [modified] => 2014-12-05 10:51:12 [embed] => ) [Country] => Array ( [id] => 208 [name] => United Kingdom [longname] => United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland [numcode] => 826 [iso] => GB [iso3] => GBR [currency] => GBP [active] => 1 [parent_id] => 191 [lft] => 413 [rght] => 414 [level] => 2 ) [Product] => Array ( ) [Artist] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => 198 [name] => Young Fathers [description] =>

Young Fathers were christened in 2008, named after the fact that all three members were named for their fathers..

They are:

‘G’ Hastings, from Drylaw, Edinburgh, Alloysious Massaquoi, originally from Liberia via Ghana and Kayus Bankole, born in Edinburgh to Nigerian parents but partially raised in Maryland in the USA, all 27 years old. Their live shows are complimented by Steven Morrison (drums & DJ) and Lauren Holt (AKA LAWholt - vocals).

The group formed after meeting at an under-16s hiphop night at the infamous Bongo Club in Edinburgh when they were all 14 years old. Almost immediately they started writing and recording together, initially on an old karoake machine plugged into a cheap cassette recorderat G’s parents house.

After going through various guises over several years and after hooking up with a local production company, they eventually settled on the name Young Fathers and recorded their first album with Tim Brinkhurst (AKA London) as producer. The recordings included their first single, Straight Back On It, which was given a limited release in 2009 and was received well enough to get them a couple of TV appearances, plays on BBC radio, some festival dates and the support slots with Simian Mobile Disco and Esser on UK tours.

Straight Back On It, a bang-on-the-money pop song built around Afrika Bambaataa’s reworking of Kraftwerk, was indicative of the rest of the album, Inconceivable Child… Conceived, in as much as the album was a state of the art teenage pop collection. Unfortunately the album was never released; however, another single, separately recorded, Automatic, was given a limited online release, but failed to have much impact.

In 2011 and after writing and recording yet another, unreleased album, the group decided a radical change was necessary and they finally disconnected themselves from the local production company and took control of their destiny. Recording mini-album (or ‘mixtape’ as it was called) TAPE ONE in just over a week, finishing a track a day and having it available for download within two weeks of recording gave them renewed vigour. They quickly followed this up by recording TAPE TWO in a similar fashion. Los Angeles based alt-hiphop label, Anticon, discovered them online and within a few months had signed them up for a short deal that saw both TAPEs officially released in 2013.

The group, meanwhile, continued to tour, gathering an impressive reputation as a fierce live act. They played all over Europe and made their US debut at SxSW in Austin, Texas, in March 2013.

Following support from the BBC’s Zane Lowe and Lauren Laverne, and an appearance on influential USA talk show, Jimmy Kimmel in 2014, TAPE TWO won Scottish Album Of The Year (‘The SAY Award’) and this was followed by their latest album, DEAD, released this time on Anticon in the USA and Big Dada in the UK and Europe, receiving the Mercury Award for best album of 2014. They won as the underdogs and there was a minor controversy because they didn’t look particularly joyful at the presentation and because they refused to speak to some of the more right wing press covering the event.

Immediately after winning the Mercury, YFs travelled to Berlin where they continued making their new album in a freezing basement in a building near the railway yards. Returning to the more familiar (and warmer) basement studio in Edinburgh where most of their recordings were made, to finish the album, they ended 2014 by playing a home town show at Edinburgh’s Hogmanay New year’s Eve festival in front of several thousand people.

The new album, White Men Are Black Men Too, has been recorded at various places around the world, including Melbourne and London as well as Berlin and Edinburgh and features the Leith Congregational Choir on a couple of tracks.

Young Fathers played over 140 shows during 2014, including On Blackheath Festival (curated by Massive Attack). They toured the UK, large swathes of Europe and did a six week stint in the USA. The new year already has them booked to play even more. White Men Are Black Men Too is due for release in April.

[links] => [image_upload_id] => 20542 [label_id] => 2 [twitter_username] => youngfathers [instagram_id] => [instagram_username] => [link] => [listed] => 1 [sortname] => Young Fathers [created] => 2013-10-18 16:52:18 [modified] => 2015-03-31 14:34:35 [slug] => young-fathers [fuga_id] => [description_clean] =>

Young Fathers were christened in 2008, named after the fact that all three members were named for their fathers..

They are:

‘G’ Hastings, from Drylaw, Edinburgh, Alloysious Massaquoi, originally from Liberia via Ghana and Kayus Bankole, born in Edinburgh to Nigerian parents but partially raised in Maryland in the USA, all 27 years old. Their live shows are complimented by Steven Morrison (drums & DJ) and Lauren Holt (AKA LAWholt - vocals).

The group formed after meeting at an under-16s hiphop night at the infamous Bongo Club in Edinburgh when they were all 14 years old. Almost immediately they started writing and recording together, initially on an old karoake machine plugged into a cheap cassette recorderat G’s parents house.

After going through various guises over several years and after hooking up with a local production company, they eventually settled on the name Young Fathers and recorded their first album with Tim Brinkhurst (AKA London) as producer. The recordings included their first single, Straight Back On It, which was given a limited release in 2009 and was received well enough to get them a couple of TV appearances, plays on BBC radio, some festival dates and the support slots with Simian Mobile Disco and Esser on UK tours.

Straight Back On It, a bang-on-the-money pop song built around Afrika Bambaataa’s reworking of Kraftwerk, was indicative of the rest of the album, Inconceivable Child… Conceived, in as much as the album was a state of the art teenage pop collection. Unfortunately the album was never released; however, another single, separately recorded, Automatic, was given a limited online release, but failed to have much impact.

In 2011 and after writing and recording yet another, unreleased album, the group decided a radical change was necessary and they finally disconnected themselves from the local production company and took control of their destiny. Recording mini-album (or ‘mixtape’ as it was called) TAPE ONE in just over a week, finishing a track a day and having it available for download within two weeks of recording gave them renewed vigour. They quickly followed this up by recording TAPE TWO in a similar fashion. Los Angeles based alt-hiphop label, Anticon, discovered them online and within a few months had signed them up for a short deal that saw both TAPEs officially released in 2013.

The group, meanwhile, continued to tour, gathering an impressive reputation as a fierce live act. They played all over Europe and made their US debut at SxSW in Austin, Texas, in March 2013.

Following support from the BBC’s Zane Lowe and Lauren Laverne, and an appearance on influential USA talk show, Jimmy Kimmel in 2014, TAPE TWO won Scottish Album Of The Year (‘The SAY Award’) and this was followed by their latest album, DEAD, released this time on Anticon in the USA and Big Dada in the UK and Europe, receiving the Mercury Award for best album of 2014. They won as the underdogs and there was a minor controversy because they didn’t look particularly joyful at the presentation and because they refused to speak to some of the more right wing press covering the event.

Immediately after winning the Mercury, YFs travelled to Berlin where they continued making their new album in a freezing basement in a building near the railway yards. Returning to the more familiar (and warmer) basement studio in Edinburgh where most of their recordings were made, to finish the album, they ended 2014 by playing a home town show at Edinburgh’s Hogmanay New year’s Eve festival in front of several thousand people.

The new album, White Men Are Black Men Too, has been recorded at various places around the world, including Melbourne and London as well as Berlin and Edinburgh and features the Leith Congregational Choir on a couple of tracks.

Young Fathers played over 140 shows during 2014, including On Blackheath Festival (curated by Massive Attack). They toured the UK, large swathes of Europe and did a six week stint in the USA. The new year already has them booked to play even more. White Men Are Black Men Too is due for release in April.

[links_clean] => [counter_player] => [counter_biog] => [tracking] => [conversions] => [hide_preorder] => 0 [hide_tracks] => 0 [hide_buy] => 0 ) ) ) [4] => Array ( [Event] => Array ( [id] => 13903 [date] => 2015-05-21 [artist] => Howling [city] => Dublin [state] => [country] => IE [venue] => Button Factory [promoter] => [description] => [ticket_url] => http://www.residentadvisor.net/event.aspx?697867 [image_upload_id] => 20558 [created] => 2015-02-10 10:37:12 [modified] => 2015-03-18 17:31:24 [year_slug] => 2015 [month_slug] => may [day_slug] => 21 [slug] => howling-dublin-button-factory [description_clean] => [products_count] => 0 [hidden] => 0 [soldout] => 0 ) [Image] => Array ( [id] => 20558 [media_type] => image [artist] => HOWLING [title] => HOWLING Press Photo 2015 [credits] => [buy_link] => [filename] => images/howling/HOWLING-PRESSPIC-1-byMichaelMann.jpg [checksum] => 2ccf32397613b4214c4c3693bd4d7b80 [mime_type] => image/jpeg [size] => 7467559 [external_url] => [image_upload_id] => [first_track_id] => [first_release_id] => [listed] => 0 [active] => 0 [processed] => 1 [artist_slug] => howling [slug] => howling-press-photo-2015 [created] => 2015-02-04 07:53:02 [modified] => 2015-02-04 07:53:11 [embed] => ) [Country] => Array ( [id] => 200 [name] => Ireland [longname] => Ireland [numcode] => 372 [iso] => IE [iso3] => IRL [currency] => EUR [active] => 1 [parent_id] => 191 [lft] => 397 [rght] => 398 [level] => 2 ) [Product] => Array ( ) [Artist] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => 223 [name] => Howling [description] =>

Howling’s album Sacred Ground stands for many things at once: collaboration, improvisation, simplicity, unexpected happenstance. The original track ‘Howling’ exploded virally in early 2012 (via Dixon’s Boiler Room set), though hardly past demo stage at the time, and proceeded to climb charts and win awards throughout electronic music. The track’s two humble collaborators - singer/producer/folk-electronic artist Ry X and me producer/Innervisions leader Frank Wiedemann - never saw it coming.

Nor did they expect that a few years later, despite being from two different sonic universes and living on two different sides of the world, their debut album would be pressed in Berlin. Sacred Ground will be released in May 2015 as a collaboration between Modeselektor’s archetypal Berlin label Monkeytown and Counter, an imprint of Ninja Tune.

Raised in a remote town in Australia, and now based in LA, Ry Cuming met Karlsruhe-born, Berlin-based Frank Wiedemann on Skype through a mutual friend. Ry had risen to underground-folk fame with his breakthrough hit ‘Berlin’ and band The Acid, while Wiedemann had long sat as royalty in the 4/4 scene.

After their ‘Howling’ track took off unintentionally, the pair met in Berlin for two shows, and two songs were made very quickly and intuitively in their two days of rehearsal. Session/rehearsal recordings flowed naturally from there, with songs sprouting up in very different atmospheres: a ceremony space in Topenga, CA surrounded by deep forest (hence their lush track ‘Forest’); amongst the WMC madness in Miami; in rehearsals in Zurich (indeed, where their ‘Zurich’ track was magically captured); even on Frank’s farm in South Germany at Lake Constance.

First single ‘Signs' is a shining representative of Howling’s album, ‘Sacred Ground’. A wondrous synergy of both artists, with tangible elements of Frank’s characteristic sound (deep, layered, amalgamative) creeping in ever so slightly amongst the profound freeness of Ry’s vocals and production. But the project takes both artists to someplace new altogether: beautiful, hypnotic soundscapes that somehow hold a sense of abandon and a sense of being found.

“Our process was very, very organic. For both of us, it’s just about the creation. Each song has a little journey of its own. The vision’s beautiful between us because there’s a lot of trust. It’s a very intuitive process where we fall in love with one element of the song or one element of a thought, and we follow that until both of those ideas have been met.” – Ry X

Howling In 2015, the collective Children of the Light from Holland will be building a live tour with Howling, creating a bespoke, interactive light setup.

[links] => [image_upload_id] => 20558 [label_id] => 5 [twitter_username] => HowlingHowling [instagram_id] => [instagram_username] => HowlingMusic [link] => [listed] => 0 [sortname] => Howling [created] => 2015-02-10 10:11:49 [modified] => 2015-03-09 10:37:06 [slug] => howling [fuga_id] => [description_clean] =>

Howling’s album Sacred Ground stands for many things at once: collaboration, improvisation, simplicity, unexpected happenstance. The original track ‘Howling’ exploded virally in early 2012 (via Dixon’s Boiler Room set), though hardly past demo stage at the time, and proceeded to climb charts and win awards throughout electronic music. The track’s two humble collaborators - singer/producer/folk-electronic artist Ry X and me producer/Innervisions leader Frank Wiedemann - never saw it coming.

Nor did they expect that a few years later, despite being from two different sonic universes and living on two different sides of the world, their debut album would be pressed in Berlin. Sacred Ground will be released in May 2015 as a collaboration between Modeselektor’s archetypal Berlin label Monkeytown and Counter, an imprint of Ninja Tune.

Raised in a remote town in Australia, and now based in LA, Ry Cuming met Karlsruhe-born, Berlin-based Frank Wiedemann on Skype through a mutual friend. Ry had risen to underground-folk fame with his breakthrough hit ‘Berlin’ and band The Acid, while Wiedemann had long sat as royalty in the 4/4 scene.

After their ‘Howling’ track took off unintentionally, the pair met in Berlin for two shows, and two songs were made very quickly and intuitively in their two days of rehearsal. Session/rehearsal recordings flowed naturally from there, with songs sprouting up in very different atmospheres: a ceremony space in Topenga, CA surrounded by deep forest (hence their lush track ‘Forest’); amongst the WMC madness in Miami; in rehearsals in Zurich (indeed, where their ‘Zurich’ track was magically captured); even on Frank’s farm in South Germany at Lake Constance.

First single ‘Signs' is a shining representative of Howling’s album, ‘Sacred Ground’. A wondrous synergy of both artists, with tangible elements of Frank’s characteristic sound (deep, layered, amalgamative) creeping in ever so slightly amongst the profound freeness of Ry’s vocals and production. But the project takes both artists to someplace new altogether: beautiful, hypnotic soundscapes that somehow hold a sense of abandon and a sense of being found.

“Our process was very, very organic. For both of us, it’s just about the creation. Each song has a little journey of its own. The vision’s beautiful between us because there’s a lot of trust. It’s a very intuitive process where we fall in love with one element of the song or one element of a thought, and we follow that until both of those ideas have been met.” – Ry X

Howling In 2015, the collective Children of the Light from Holland will be building a live tour with Howling, creating a bespoke, interactive light setup.

[links_clean] => [counter_player] => [counter_biog] =>

Howling’s album Sacred Ground stands for many things at once: collaboration, improvisation, simplicity, unexpected happenstance. The original track ‘Howling’ exploded virally in early 2012 (via Dixon’s Boiler Room set), though hardly past demo stage at the time, and proceeded to climb charts and win awards throughout electronic music. The track’s two humble collaborators - singer/producer/folk-electronic artist Ry X and me producer/Innervisions leader Frank Wiedemann - never saw it coming.

Nor did they expect that a few years later, despite being from two different sonic universes and living on two different sides of the world, their debut album would be pressed in Berlin. Sacred Ground will be released in May 2015 as a collaboration between Modeselektor’s archetypal Berlin label Monkeytown and Counter, an imprint of Ninja Tune.

Raised in a remote town in Australia, and now based in LA, Ry Cuming met Karlsruhe-born, Berlin-based Frank Wiedemann on Skype through a mutual friend. Ry had risen to underground-folk fame with his breakthrough hit ‘Berlin’ and band The Acid, while Wiedemann had long sat as royalty in the 4/4 scene.

After their ‘Howling’ track took off unintentionally, the pair met in Berlin for two shows, and two songs were made very quickly and intuitively in their two days of rehearsal. Session/rehearsal recordings flowed naturally from there, with songs sprouting up in very different atmospheres: a ceremony space in Topenga, CA surrounded by deep forest (hence their lush track ‘Forest’); amongst the WMC madness in Miami; in rehearsals in Zurich (indeed, where their ‘Zurich’ track was magically captured); even on Frank’s farm in South Germany at Lake Constance.

First single ‘Signs' is a shining representative of Howling’s album, ‘Sacred Ground’. A wondrous synergy of both artists, with tangible elements of Frank’s characteristic sound (deep, layered, amalgamative) creeping in ever so slightly amongst the profound freeness of Ry’s vocals and production. But the project takes both artists to someplace new altogether: beautiful, hypnotic soundscapes that somehow hold a sense of abandon and a sense of being found.

“Our process was very, very organic. For both of us, it’s just about the creation. Each song has a little journey of its own. The vision’s beautiful between us because there’s a lot of trust. It’s a very intuitive process where we fall in love with one element of the song or one element of a thought, and we follow that until both of those ideas have been met.” – Ry X

Howling

In 2015, the collective Children of the Light from Holland will be building a live tour with Howling, creating a bespoke, interactive light setup.

[tracking] => [conversions] => [hide_preorder] => 0 [hide_tracks] => 0 [hide_buy] => 0 ) ) ) [5] => Array ( [Event] => Array ( [id] => 13681 [date] => 2015-05-22 [artist] => Young Fathers [city] => Leeds [state] => [country] => GB [venue] => Brudenell Social Club [promoter] => [description] => [ticket_url] => http://www.seetickets.com/Event/young-fathers/brudenell-social-club/841134 [image_upload_id] => 20364 [created] => 2014-12-11 16:51:50 [modified] => 2014-12-15 11:02:12 [year_slug] => 2015 [month_slug] => may [day_slug] => 22 [slug] => young-fathers-leeds-brudenell-social-club [description_clean] => [products_count] => 0 [hidden] => 0 [soldout] => 0 ) [Image] => Array ( [id] => 20364 [media_type] => image [artist] => Young Fathers [title] => Young Fathers Press Shot 2014 [credits] => [buy_link] => [filename] => images/young-fathers/timspicoct1.jpg [checksum] => d16561a1f0ef8f6ecbf82b02a6bdc0ad [mime_type] => image/jpeg [size] => 151449 [external_url] => [image_upload_id] => [first_track_id] => [first_release_id] => [listed] => 0 [active] => 1 [processed] => 1 [artist_slug] => young-fathers [slug] => young-fathers-press-shot-2014 [created] => 2014-12-05 10:51:10 [modified] => 2014-12-05 10:51:12 [embed] => ) [Country] => Array ( [id] => 208 [name] => United Kingdom [longname] => United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland [numcode] => 826 [iso] => GB [iso3] => GBR [currency] => GBP [active] => 1 [parent_id] => 191 [lft] => 413 [rght] => 414 [level] => 2 ) [Product] => Array ( ) [Artist] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => 198 [name] => Young Fathers [description] =>

Young Fathers were christened in 2008, named after the fact that all three members were named for their fathers..

They are:

‘G’ Hastings, from Drylaw, Edinburgh, Alloysious Massaquoi, originally from Liberia via Ghana and Kayus Bankole, born in Edinburgh to Nigerian parents but partially raised in Maryland in the USA, all 27 years old. Their live shows are complimented by Steven Morrison (drums & DJ) and Lauren Holt (AKA LAWholt - vocals).

The group formed after meeting at an under-16s hiphop night at the infamous Bongo Club in Edinburgh when they were all 14 years old. Almost immediately they started writing and recording together, initially on an old karoake machine plugged into a cheap cassette recorderat G’s parents house.

After going through various guises over several years and after hooking up with a local production company, they eventually settled on the name Young Fathers and recorded their first album with Tim Brinkhurst (AKA London) as producer. The recordings included their first single, Straight Back On It, which was given a limited release in 2009 and was received well enough to get them a couple of TV appearances, plays on BBC radio, some festival dates and the support slots with Simian Mobile Disco and Esser on UK tours.

Straight Back On It, a bang-on-the-money pop song built around Afrika Bambaataa’s reworking of Kraftwerk, was indicative of the rest of the album, Inconceivable Child… Conceived, in as much as the album was a state of the art teenage pop collection. Unfortunately the album was never released; however, another single, separately recorded, Automatic, was given a limited online release, but failed to have much impact.

In 2011 and after writing and recording yet another, unreleased album, the group decided a radical change was necessary and they finally disconnected themselves from the local production company and took control of their destiny. Recording mini-album (or ‘mixtape’ as it was called) TAPE ONE in just over a week, finishing a track a day and having it available for download within two weeks of recording gave them renewed vigour. They quickly followed this up by recording TAPE TWO in a similar fashion. Los Angeles based alt-hiphop label, Anticon, discovered them online and within a few months had signed them up for a short deal that saw both TAPEs officially released in 2013.

The group, meanwhile, continued to tour, gathering an impressive reputation as a fierce live act. They played all over Europe and made their US debut at SxSW in Austin, Texas, in March 2013.

Following support from the BBC’s Zane Lowe and Lauren Laverne, and an appearance on influential USA talk show, Jimmy Kimmel in 2014, TAPE TWO won Scottish Album Of The Year (‘The SAY Award’) and this was followed by their latest album, DEAD, released this time on Anticon in the USA and Big Dada in the UK and Europe, receiving the Mercury Award for best album of 2014. They won as the underdogs and there was a minor controversy because they didn’t look particularly joyful at the presentation and because they refused to speak to some of the more right wing press covering the event.

Immediately after winning the Mercury, YFs travelled to Berlin where they continued making their new album in a freezing basement in a building near the railway yards. Returning to the more familiar (and warmer) basement studio in Edinburgh where most of their recordings were made, to finish the album, they ended 2014 by playing a home town show at Edinburgh’s Hogmanay New year’s Eve festival in front of several thousand people.

The new album, White Men Are Black Men Too, has been recorded at various places around the world, including Melbourne and London as well as Berlin and Edinburgh and features the Leith Congregational Choir on a couple of tracks.

Young Fathers played over 140 shows during 2014, including On Blackheath Festival (curated by Massive Attack). They toured the UK, large swathes of Europe and did a six week stint in the USA. The new year already has them booked to play even more. White Men Are Black Men Too is due for release in April.

[links] => [image_upload_id] => 20542 [label_id] => 2 [twitter_username] => youngfathers [instagram_id] => [instagram_username] => [link] => [listed] => 1 [sortname] => Young Fathers [created] => 2013-10-18 16:52:18 [modified] => 2015-03-31 14:34:35 [slug] => young-fathers [fuga_id] => [description_clean] =>

Young Fathers were christened in 2008, named after the fact that all three members were named for their fathers..

They are:

‘G’ Hastings, from Drylaw, Edinburgh, Alloysious Massaquoi, originally from Liberia via Ghana and Kayus Bankole, born in Edinburgh to Nigerian parents but partially raised in Maryland in the USA, all 27 years old. Their live shows are complimented by Steven Morrison (drums & DJ) and Lauren Holt (AKA LAWholt - vocals).

The group formed after meeting at an under-16s hiphop night at the infamous Bongo Club in Edinburgh when they were all 14 years old. Almost immediately they started writing and recording together, initially on an old karoake machine plugged into a cheap cassette recorderat G’s parents house.

After going through various guises over several years and after hooking up with a local production company, they eventually settled on the name Young Fathers and recorded their first album with Tim Brinkhurst (AKA London) as producer. The recordings included their first single, Straight Back On It, which was given a limited release in 2009 and was received well enough to get them a couple of TV appearances, plays on BBC radio, some festival dates and the support slots with Simian Mobile Disco and Esser on UK tours.

Straight Back On It, a bang-on-the-money pop song built around Afrika Bambaataa’s reworking of Kraftwerk, was indicative of the rest of the album, Inconceivable Child… Conceived, in as much as the album was a state of the art teenage pop collection. Unfortunately the album was never released; however, another single, separately recorded, Automatic, was given a limited online release, but failed to have much impact.

In 2011 and after writing and recording yet another, unreleased album, the group decided a radical change was necessary and they finally disconnected themselves from the local production company and took control of their destiny. Recording mini-album (or ‘mixtape’ as it was called) TAPE ONE in just over a week, finishing a track a day and having it available for download within two weeks of recording gave them renewed vigour. They quickly followed this up by recording TAPE TWO in a similar fashion. Los Angeles based alt-hiphop label, Anticon, discovered them online and within a few months had signed them up for a short deal that saw both TAPEs officially released in 2013.

The group, meanwhile, continued to tour, gathering an impressive reputation as a fierce live act. They played all over Europe and made their US debut at SxSW in Austin, Texas, in March 2013.

Following support from the BBC’s Zane Lowe and Lauren Laverne, and an appearance on influential USA talk show, Jimmy Kimmel in 2014, TAPE TWO won Scottish Album Of The Year (‘The SAY Award’) and this was followed by their latest album, DEAD, released this time on Anticon in the USA and Big Dada in the UK and Europe, receiving the Mercury Award for best album of 2014. They won as the underdogs and there was a minor controversy because they didn’t look particularly joyful at the presentation and because they refused to speak to some of the more right wing press covering the event.

Immediately after winning the Mercury, YFs travelled to Berlin where they continued making their new album in a freezing basement in a building near the railway yards. Returning to the more familiar (and warmer) basement studio in Edinburgh where most of their recordings were made, to finish the album, they ended 2014 by playing a home town show at Edinburgh’s Hogmanay New year’s Eve festival in front of several thousand people.

The new album, White Men Are Black Men Too, has been recorded at various places around the world, including Melbourne and London as well as Berlin and Edinburgh and features the Leith Congregational Choir on a couple of tracks.

Young Fathers played over 140 shows during 2014, including On Blackheath Festival (curated by Massive Attack). They toured the UK, large swathes of Europe and did a six week stint in the USA. The new year already has them booked to play even more. White Men Are Black Men Too is due for release in April.

[links_clean] => [counter_player] => [counter_biog] => [tracking] => [conversions] => [hide_preorder] => 0 [hide_tracks] => 0 [hide_buy] => 0 ) ) ) [6] => Array ( [Event] => Array ( [id] => 13894 [date] => 2015-05-22 [artist] => Portico [city] => Brussels [state] => [country] => BE [venue] => AB [promoter] => [description] => [ticket_url] => http://www.abconcerts.be/en/agenda/events/portico-formerly-portico-quartet/18874/ [image_upload_id] => 20575 [created] => 2015-02-04 12:05:36 [modified] => 2015-02-06 11:36:44 [year_slug] => 2015 [month_slug] => may [day_slug] => 22 [slug] => portico-brussels-ab [description_clean] => [products_count] => 0 [hidden] => 0 [soldout] => 0 ) [Image] => Array ( [id] => 20575 [media_type] => image [artist] => Portico [title] => 2015 tour [credits] => [buy_link] => [filename] => images/portico/Portico-tour-poster-lores.jpg [checksum] => 9a55be3183aa87da892ebc8fc13ae693 [mime_type] => image/jpeg [size] => 114003 [external_url] => [image_upload_id] => [first_track_id] => [first_release_id] => [listed] => 0 [active] => 1 [processed] => 1 [artist_slug] => portico [slug] => 2015-tour [created] => 2015-02-06 10:28:14 [modified] => 2015-02-06 10:28:15 [embed] => ) [Country] => Array ( [id] => 228 [name] => Belgium [longname] => Belgium [numcode] => 56 [iso] => BE [iso3] => BEL [currency] => EUR [active] => 1 [parent_id] => 226 [lft] => 453 [rght] => 454 [level] => 2 ) [Product] => Array ( ) [Artist] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => 213 [name] => Portico [description] =>

If the name PORTICO seems familiar, that’s probably understandable, as is the fact that the faces behind it may seem recognisable too. As Portico Quartet, Jack Wyllie, Duncan Bellamy, Milo Fitzpatrick and then member Nick Mulvey released their first album together – the Mercury Music Prize nominated Knee-Deep In The North Sea – back in 2007, but things around a group change, especially when you start out so young, and by the time Mulvey’s successor, Keir Vine, had also moved on, the three London based musicians realised that they were no longer satisfied by the music they were making. They had, as they put it, “gone as far as they could”. It was early 2013 - they’d all grown up, and were no longer a quartet either. This time, they decided, it was their turn to make the changes.

LIVING FIELDS is the debut album by PORTICO, and if the people – and the name they employ – seem familiar, rest assured that the music they make is not. Gone are the hang drum, the saxophone and the drum kit with which they first caught the world’s attention. What emerges instead is – put simply – startling. The people are the same, but the band’s been transformed. PORTICO and LIVING FIELDS are the proof, and one listen makes it clear that this is almost entirely new territory for Fitzpatrick, Wyllie and Bellamy. Sparse, immersive and spectral, it’s an album that is at once substantial and yet insubstantial, capable of absorbing one into an intricate sonic world whose fundamental components seem paradoxically intangible.

The temptation might be to define LIVING FIELDS as an “electronic” album. As Bellamy points out, however, plenty of its components come from an analogue world. “I don't think we feel that it's overtly 'electronic',” he elaborates, “in the way that, say, Aphex Twin or Autechre are defined by the association. For starters, there's piano, guitar and bass on the record – though we usually try and treat them in an interesting way – as well as field recordings. For example, in ‘Void’ there’s a recording of a very large, old ship being torn apart, which ties into the concepts of decay and disintegration which run through the album. But a lot of the sounds are electronic and come from synthesisers, samplers or drum machines. Even most of the more acoustic sounds are mediated by effects or computers somehow.”

As it happens, the process of change began some time ago, and arguably, Mulvey’s departure from the ranks in 2011 was connected to this gradual metamorphosis. As Bellamy admits, “We were getting interested in electronics, and finding more ways we could expand the band’s sound, and as we were getting more enthusiastic, Nick was beginning to feel like his role was literally getting drowned out, and was becoming more interested in his own music”.

By late 2012, the band had reached a crossroads. The three of them, plus Vine, had experimented with new approaches, as well as vocalists, on that year’s eponymous album, but afterwards they found themselves in musical disarray. As Fitzpatrick recalls, “We just had this massive existential crisis, where we were like, I don’t think we want to do this any more, do we? No one seemed to be very enthusiastic about that current state of the band.” Wyllie underlines this: “It was a good time to take a step back, to really examine what we were collectively willing to do, and what we were interested in.”

In trying to rediscover what it was that had first brought them together, the musicians learned one crucial lesson: if they could identify their initial chemistry, then they could salvage the very essence of their creative energy. “That's the point we decided to draw a line under the old Portico Quartet,” Bellamy says, “and just do something that was really different and new, and a challenge for us again. It worked, because we suddenly felt way more invigorated and passionate about making music together again.”Portico Quartet’, they understood at last, was merely the name of a project on which they’d collaborated. ‘PORTICO’ would be another.

This realisation, and the freedom that it allowed them, enabled the trio to reinvent themselves. Conscious that they were simultaneously the same band, and yet a new one, they chose to drop the ‘Quartet’ from their name as a symbol of their new beginnings, but to keep ‘Portico’ as, in Fitzpatrick’s words, “an acknowledgement that we are the same three people, with a certain chemistry, looking for the same things.” What followed was, in a sense, a return to their roots: though tracks were still built up using loops and individual sections, they embarked on more structured material, just as they had on their debut. “One of the things we were interested in, especially in the early stuff, was song writing,” Wyllie explains, “but by the third album we’d started to explore textures.” As a rejuvenated unit, PORTICO now incorporate both these elements into their music, with the likes of the title track, "101", "Colour Fading" and "Bright Luck" all strikingly melodic but elaborately arranged. “In the past,” Bellamy points out, “we had always written all together, playing through the compositions and arrangements with all our instruments. Once we were finished we would go to a studio to record it all live, and then do overdubs. This time we just invested in some gear for our studio and started recording directly onto the computer. If someone had an idea, we would put it down straight away, and that could be the finished track. It was quite liberating because suddenly we had way more control of the recording process.”

What subsequently materialised is, as they themselves describe it, “music which moves forward towards distant places while offering rare intimacy, arriving somewhere between structured pop songs and a disintegrating ambience, a unique blend of the sublunary and the celestial.” They were inspired by leftfield artists like William Basinski and Tim Hecker – with whose music theirs shares what Wyllie describes as “this feeling of something breaking up and falling apart” – and a crucial moment in their development came when they were asked by the Royal Academy of Art to write music for an exhibition about space and architecture in early 2014. “That opened up a new sound world,” Fitzpatrick says. “ ‘Void’ is actually from that session, and ‘Dissolution’ too.”

Aware that they were ready to work with vocalists, they sought suitable candidates, and eventually alighted on three singers with whom they already had a connection, and whose distinctive voices matched what they had in mind. The first part of the puzzle was Alt-J’s Joe Newman: he’d grown up two doors down from Wyllie in Southampton, where Fitzpatrick was also raised, and they’d always been mutual fans of each other’s music. His initial contribution, "101", was the proof PORTICO needed that their musical gamble had paid off, and he soon delivered further tracks, "Brittle" and "Atacama". “He’s obviously a really talented songwriter,” Wyllie states. “He just kept coming out with these great melodies, really quickly too. It helps collaborating with people if you’ve got a personal connection.” It was the personal connection that seemed vital: Old friend, and former Portico house mate, Jamie Woon, also came on board for the epic "Memory Of Newness": They’d always wanted to work together in the past, but only now did the material suit the concept. Woon, in turn, had introduced the band to Jono McCleery, One of the band’s favourite singers, he had opened for Portico Quartet at the ICA a few years earlier and, as with Jamie and Joe, the collaboration flowed naturally. The songs on which they would go on to collaborate were so successful that McCleery was invited to join the band to help play the new material live, and the album takes its title from one of their collaborations, the darkly hypnotic Living Fields.

From the outset, PORTICO insisted that LIVING FIELDS maintain an overarching concept, rather than being, as Wyllie puts it, “a collection of songs with totally disparate, unrelated lyrics”. Each of the band’s members had been forced to confront various diverse private issues in the preceding period of time, and they wanted the record to remain personal to them, despite these outside collaborators. Their search for a method of articulating the relevant themes included work by Herman Hesse and Philip Larkin, but eventually they found the touchstone they were searching for in the shape of an award-winning Chilean documentary, Nostalgia For The Light.

The film crystallised many of the topics that they’d been addressing amongst themselves – the search for identity, the significance of memory, questions about life and death, the way that each answer we uncover can provoke further mysteries – and they asked McCleery, Woon and Newman to view it before they wrote their lyrics. “It wasn’t like we watched it and said, Let’s make an album about that,” Wyllie clarifies. “It was, Let’s find something that we can use to inspire some singers that connects to what we’re thinking.” It was the final detail in the making of an extraordinary, enigmatic but unified record, and, just as some of the sounds seem to veer in and out of focus, so words and phrases drift through a haze of reverb-drenched pianos, synth arpeggios, subterranean bass and ambient noise, all punctured by illuminated shards of programmed and live drums.

The results are unlike anything else that’s come before and, for all the band know, may even be unlike anything they do in the future. As Fitzpatrick concludes, “This is just one album. Who knows what the next one’s going to be like? We’re taking it one step at a time. What we’ve learned is that it’s really all about us three.”

Welcome, then, PORTICO and their LIVING FIELDS: a bold, adventurous step into the unknown that bravely inspires as many questions as answers. As Hermann Hesse wrote in Stages, a poem from The Glass Bead Game that became one of the band’s maxims:

“Serenely they let us move to distant places, And let no sentiment of home detain us. The Cosmic Spirit seeks not to restrain us But lifts us stage by stage to wider spaces.”

[links] =>

porticomusic.co.uk
Facebook
Twitter
Instagram
SoundCloud

[image_upload_id] => 20561 [label_id] => 1 [twitter_username] => porticomusic [instagram_id] => 1308320561 [instagram_username] => porticomusic [link] => [listed] => 1 [sortname] => Portico [created] => 2014-09-23 15:38:15 [modified] => 2015-03-26 17:30:47 [slug] => portico [fuga_id] => [description_clean] =>

If the name PORTICO seems familiar, that’s probably understandable, as is the fact that the faces behind it may seem recognisable too. As Portico Quartet, Jack Wyllie, Duncan Bellamy, Milo Fitzpatrick and then member Nick Mulvey released their first album together – the Mercury Music Prize nominated Knee-Deep In The North Sea – back in 2007, but things around a group change, especially when you start out so young, and by the time Mulvey’s successor, Keir Vine, had also moved on, the three London based musicians realised that they were no longer satisfied by the music they were making. They had, as they put it, “gone as far as they could”. It was early 2013 - they’d all grown up, and were no longer a quartet either. This time, they decided, it was their turn to make the changes.

LIVING FIELDS is the debut album by PORTICO, and if the people – and the name they employ – seem familiar, rest assured that the music they make is not. Gone are the hang drum, the saxophone and the drum kit with which they first caught the world’s attention. What emerges instead is – put simply – startling. The people are the same, but the band’s been transformed. PORTICO and LIVING FIELDS are the proof, and one listen makes it clear that this is almost entirely new territory for Fitzpatrick, Wyllie and Bellamy. Sparse, immersive and spectral, it’s an album that is at once substantial and yet insubstantial, capable of absorbing one into an intricate sonic world whose fundamental components seem paradoxically intangible.

The temptation might be to define LIVING FIELDS as an “electronic” album. As Bellamy points out, however, plenty of its components come from an analogue world. “I don't think we feel that it's overtly 'electronic',” he elaborates, “in the way that, say, Aphex Twin or Autechre are defined by the association. For starters, there's piano, guitar and bass on the record – though we usually try and treat them in an interesting way – as well as field recordings. For example, in ‘Void’ there’s a recording of a very large, old ship being torn apart, which ties into the concepts of decay and disintegration which run through the album. But a lot of the sounds are electronic and come from synthesisers, samplers or drum machines. Even most of the more acoustic sounds are mediated by effects or computers somehow.”

As it happens, the process of change began some time ago, and arguably, Mulvey’s departure from the ranks in 2011 was connected to this gradual metamorphosis. As Bellamy admits, “We were getting interested in electronics, and finding more ways we could expand the band’s sound, and as we were getting more enthusiastic, Nick was beginning to feel like his role was literally getting drowned out, and was becoming more interested in his own music”.

By late 2012, the band had reached a crossroads. The three of them, plus Vine, had experimented with new approaches, as well as vocalists, on that year’s eponymous album, but afterwards they found themselves in musical disarray. As Fitzpatrick recalls, “We just had this massive existential crisis, where we were like, I don’t think we want to do this any more, do we? No one seemed to be very enthusiastic about that current state of the band.” Wyllie underlines this: “It was a good time to take a step back, to really examine what we were collectively willing to do, and what we were interested in.”

In trying to rediscover what it was that had first brought them together, the musicians learned one crucial lesson: if they could identify their initial chemistry, then they could salvage the very essence of their creative energy. “That's the point we decided to draw a line under the old Portico Quartet,” Bellamy says, “and just do something that was really different and new, and a challenge for us again. It worked, because we suddenly felt way more invigorated and passionate about making music together again.”Portico Quartet’, they understood at last, was merely the name of a project on which they’d collaborated. ‘PORTICO’ would be another.

This realisation, and the freedom that it allowed them, enabled the trio to reinvent themselves. Conscious that they were simultaneously the same band, and yet a new one, they chose to drop the ‘Quartet’ from their name as a symbol of their new beginnings, but to keep ‘Portico’ as, in Fitzpatrick’s words, “an acknowledgement that we are the same three people, with a certain chemistry, looking for the same things.” What followed was, in a sense, a return to their roots: though tracks were still built up using loops and individual sections, they embarked on more structured material, just as they had on their debut. “One of the things we were interested in, especially in the early stuff, was song writing,” Wyllie explains, “but by the third album we’d started to explore textures.” As a rejuvenated unit, PORTICO now incorporate both these elements into their music, with the likes of the title track, "101", "Colour Fading" and "Bright Luck" all strikingly melodic but elaborately arranged. “In the past,” Bellamy points out, “we had always written all together, playing through the compositions and arrangements with all our instruments. Once we were finished we would go to a studio to record it all live, and then do overdubs. This time we just invested in some gear for our studio and started recording directly onto the computer. If someone had an idea, we would put it down straight away, and that could be the finished track. It was quite liberating because suddenly we had way more control of the recording process.”

What subsequently materialised is, as they themselves describe it, “music which moves forward towards distant places while offering rare intimacy, arriving somewhere between structured pop songs and a disintegrating ambience, a unique blend of the sublunary and the celestial.” They were inspired by leftfield artists like William Basinski and Tim Hecker – with whose music theirs shares what Wyllie describes as “this feeling of something breaking up and falling apart” – and a crucial moment in their development came when they were asked by the Royal Academy of Art to write music for an exhibition about space and architecture in early 2014. “That opened up a new sound world,” Fitzpatrick says. “ ‘Void’ is actually from that session, and ‘Dissolution’ too.”

Aware that they were ready to work with vocalists, they sought suitable candidates, and eventually alighted on three singers with whom they already had a connection, and whose distinctive voices matched what they had in mind. The first part of the puzzle was Alt-J’s Joe Newman: he’d grown up two doors down from Wyllie in Southampton, where Fitzpatrick was also raised, and they’d always been mutual fans of each other’s music. His initial contribution, "101", was the proof PORTICO needed that their musical gamble had paid off, and he soon delivered further tracks, "Brittle" and "Atacama". “He’s obviously a really talented songwriter,” Wyllie states. “He just kept coming out with these great melodies, really quickly too. It helps collaborating with people if you’ve got a personal connection.” It was the personal connection that seemed vital: Old friend, and former Portico house mate, Jamie Woon, also came on board for the epic "Memory Of Newness": They’d always wanted to work together in the past, but only now did the material suit the concept. Woon, in turn, had introduced the band to Jono McCleery, One of the band’s favourite singers, he had opened for Portico Quartet at the ICA a few years earlier and, as with Jamie and Joe, the collaboration flowed naturally. The songs on which they would go on to collaborate were so successful that McCleery was invited to join the band to help play the new material live, and the album takes its title from one of their collaborations, the darkly hypnotic Living Fields.

From the outset, PORTICO insisted that LIVING FIELDS maintain an overarching concept, rather than being, as Wyllie puts it, “a collection of songs with totally disparate, unrelated lyrics”. Each of the band’s members had been forced to confront various diverse private issues in the preceding period of time, and they wanted the record to remain personal to them, despite these outside collaborators. Their search for a method of articulating the relevant themes included work by Herman Hesse and Philip Larkin, but eventually they found the touchstone they were searching for in the shape of an award-winning Chilean documentary, Nostalgia For The Light.

The film crystallised many of the topics that they’d been addressing amongst themselves – the search for identity, the significance of memory, questions about life and death, the way that each answer we uncover can provoke further mysteries – and they asked McCleery, Woon and Newman to view it before they wrote their lyrics. “It wasn’t like we watched it and said, Let’s make an album about that,” Wyllie clarifies. “It was, Let’s find something that we can use to inspire some singers that connects to what we’re thinking.” It was the final detail in the making of an extraordinary, enigmatic but unified record, and, just as some of the sounds seem to veer in and out of focus, so words and phrases drift through a haze of reverb-drenched pianos, synth arpeggios, subterranean bass and ambient noise, all punctured by illuminated shards of programmed and live drums.

The results are unlike anything else that’s come before and, for all the band know, may even be unlike anything they do in the future. As Fitzpatrick concludes, “This is just one album. Who knows what the next one’s going to be like? We’re taking it one step at a time. What we’ve learned is that it’s really all about us three.”

Welcome, then, PORTICO and their LIVING FIELDS: a bold, adventurous step into the unknown that bravely inspires as many questions as answers. As Hermann Hesse wrote in Stages, a poem from The Glass Bead Game that became one of the band’s maxims:

“Serenely they let us move to distant places, And let no sentiment of home detain us. The Cosmic Spirit seeks not to restrain us But lifts us stage by stage to wider spaces.”

[links_clean] =>

porticomusic.co.uk
Facebook
Twitter
Instagram
SoundCloud

[counter_player] => [counter_biog] => [tracking] => [conversions] => [hide_preorder] => 0 [hide_tracks] => 0 [hide_buy] => 0 ) ) ) [7] => Array ( [Event] => Array ( [id] => 13896 [date] => 2015-05-22 [artist] => Howling [city] => London [state] => [country] => GB [venue] => Oval Space [promoter] => [description] => [ticket_url] => http://www.ovalspace.co.uk/ [image_upload_id] => 20558 [created] => 2015-02-10 10:25:14 [modified] => 2015-02-10 10:45:21 [year_slug] => 2015 [month_slug] => may [day_slug] => 22 [slug] => howling-london-oval-space [description_clean] => [products_count] => 0 [hidden] => 0 [soldout] => 0 ) [Image] => Array ( [id] => 20558 [media_type] => image [artist] => HOWLING [title] => HOWLING Press Photo 2015 [credits] => [buy_link] => [filename] => images/howling/HOWLING-PRESSPIC-1-byMichaelMann.jpg [checksum] => 2ccf32397613b4214c4c3693bd4d7b80 [mime_type] => image/jpeg [size] => 7467559 [external_url] => [image_upload_id] => [first_track_id] => [first_release_id] => [listed] => 0 [active] => 0 [processed] => 1 [artist_slug] => howling [slug] => howling-press-photo-2015 [created] => 2015-02-04 07:53:02 [modified] => 2015-02-04 07:53:11 [embed] => ) [Country] => Array ( [id] => 208 [name] => United Kingdom [longname] => United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland [numcode] => 826 [iso] => GB [iso3] => GBR [currency] => GBP [active] => 1 [parent_id] => 191 [lft] => 413 [rght] => 414 [level] => 2 ) [Product] => Array ( ) [Artist] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => 223 [name] => Howling [description] =>

Howling’s album Sacred Ground stands for many things at once: collaboration, improvisation, simplicity, unexpected happenstance. The original track ‘Howling’ exploded virally in early 2012 (via Dixon’s Boiler Room set), though hardly past demo stage at the time, and proceeded to climb charts and win awards throughout electronic music. The track’s two humble collaborators - singer/producer/folk-electronic artist Ry X and me producer/Innervisions leader Frank Wiedemann - never saw it coming.

Nor did they expect that a few years later, despite being from two different sonic universes and living on two different sides of the world, their debut album would be pressed in Berlin. Sacred Ground will be released in May 2015 as a collaboration between Modeselektor’s archetypal Berlin label Monkeytown and Counter, an imprint of Ninja Tune.

Raised in a remote town in Australia, and now based in LA, Ry Cuming met Karlsruhe-born, Berlin-based Frank Wiedemann on Skype through a mutual friend. Ry had risen to underground-folk fame with his breakthrough hit ‘Berlin’ and band The Acid, while Wiedemann had long sat as royalty in the 4/4 scene.

After their ‘Howling’ track took off unintentionally, the pair met in Berlin for two shows, and two songs were made very quickly and intuitively in their two days of rehearsal. Session/rehearsal recordings flowed naturally from there, with songs sprouting up in very different atmospheres: a ceremony space in Topenga, CA surrounded by deep forest (hence their lush track ‘Forest’); amongst the WMC madness in Miami; in rehearsals in Zurich (indeed, where their ‘Zurich’ track was magically captured); even on Frank’s farm in South Germany at Lake Constance.

First single ‘Signs' is a shining representative of Howling’s album, ‘Sacred Ground’. A wondrous synergy of both artists, with tangible elements of Frank’s characteristic sound (deep, layered, amalgamative) creeping in ever so slightly amongst the profound freeness of Ry’s vocals and production. But the project takes both artists to someplace new altogether: beautiful, hypnotic soundscapes that somehow hold a sense of abandon and a sense of being found.

“Our process was very, very organic. For both of us, it’s just about the creation. Each song has a little journey of its own. The vision’s beautiful between us because there’s a lot of trust. It’s a very intuitive process where we fall in love with one element of the song or one element of a thought, and we follow that until both of those ideas have been met.” – Ry X

Howling In 2015, the collective Children of the Light from Holland will be building a live tour with Howling, creating a bespoke, interactive light setup.

[links] => [image_upload_id] => 20558 [label_id] => 5 [twitter_username] => HowlingHowling [instagram_id] => [instagram_username] => HowlingMusic [link] => [listed] => 0 [sortname] => Howling [created] => 2015-02-10 10:11:49 [modified] => 2015-03-09 10:37:06 [slug] => howling [fuga_id] => [description_clean] =>

Howling’s album Sacred Ground stands for many things at once: collaboration, improvisation, simplicity, unexpected happenstance. The original track ‘Howling’ exploded virally in early 2012 (via Dixon’s Boiler Room set), though hardly past demo stage at the time, and proceeded to climb charts and win awards throughout electronic music. The track’s two humble collaborators - singer/producer/folk-electronic artist Ry X and me producer/Innervisions leader Frank Wiedemann - never saw it coming.

Nor did they expect that a few years later, despite being from two different sonic universes and living on two different sides of the world, their debut album would be pressed in Berlin. Sacred Ground will be released in May 2015 as a collaboration between Modeselektor’s archetypal Berlin label Monkeytown and Counter, an imprint of Ninja Tune.

Raised in a remote town in Australia, and now based in LA, Ry Cuming met Karlsruhe-born, Berlin-based Frank Wiedemann on Skype through a mutual friend. Ry had risen to underground-folk fame with his breakthrough hit ‘Berlin’ and band The Acid, while Wiedemann had long sat as royalty in the 4/4 scene.

After their ‘Howling’ track took off unintentionally, the pair met in Berlin for two shows, and two songs were made very quickly and intuitively in their two days of rehearsal. Session/rehearsal recordings flowed naturally from there, with songs sprouting up in very different atmospheres: a ceremony space in Topenga, CA surrounded by deep forest (hence their lush track ‘Forest’); amongst the WMC madness in Miami; in rehearsals in Zurich (indeed, where their ‘Zurich’ track was magically captured); even on Frank’s farm in South Germany at Lake Constance.

First single ‘Signs' is a shining representative of Howling’s album, ‘Sacred Ground’. A wondrous synergy of both artists, with tangible elements of Frank’s characteristic sound (deep, layered, amalgamative) creeping in ever so slightly amongst the profound freeness of Ry’s vocals and production. But the project takes both artists to someplace new altogether: beautiful, hypnotic soundscapes that somehow hold a sense of abandon and a sense of being found.

“Our process was very, very organic. For both of us, it’s just about the creation. Each song has a little journey of its own. The vision’s beautiful between us because there’s a lot of trust. It’s a very intuitive process where we fall in love with one element of the song or one element of a thought, and we follow that until both of those ideas have been met.” – Ry X

Howling In 2015, the collective Children of the Light from Holland will be building a live tour with Howling, creating a bespoke, interactive light setup.

[links_clean] => [counter_player] => [counter_biog] =>

Howling’s album Sacred Ground stands for many things at once: collaboration, improvisation, simplicity, unexpected happenstance. The original track ‘Howling’ exploded virally in early 2012 (via Dixon’s Boiler Room set), though hardly past demo stage at the time, and proceeded to climb charts and win awards throughout electronic music. The track’s two humble collaborators - singer/producer/folk-electronic artist Ry X and me producer/Innervisions leader Frank Wiedemann - never saw it coming.

Nor did they expect that a few years later, despite being from two different sonic universes and living on two different sides of the world, their debut album would be pressed in Berlin. Sacred Ground will be released in May 2015 as a collaboration between Modeselektor’s archetypal Berlin label Monkeytown and Counter, an imprint of Ninja Tune.

Raised in a remote town in Australia, and now based in LA, Ry Cuming met Karlsruhe-born, Berlin-based Frank Wiedemann on Skype through a mutual friend. Ry had risen to underground-folk fame with his breakthrough hit ‘Berlin’ and band The Acid, while Wiedemann had long sat as royalty in the 4/4 scene.

After their ‘Howling’ track took off unintentionally, the pair met in Berlin for two shows, and two songs were made very quickly and intuitively in their two days of rehearsal. Session/rehearsal recordings flowed naturally from there, with songs sprouting up in very different atmospheres: a ceremony space in Topenga, CA surrounded by deep forest (hence their lush track ‘Forest’); amongst the WMC madness in Miami; in rehearsals in Zurich (indeed, where their ‘Zurich’ track was magically captured); even on Frank’s farm in South Germany at Lake Constance.

First single ‘Signs' is a shining representative of Howling’s album, ‘Sacred Ground’. A wondrous synergy of both artists, with tangible elements of Frank’s characteristic sound (deep, layered, amalgamative) creeping in ever so slightly amongst the profound freeness of Ry’s vocals and production. But the project takes both artists to someplace new altogether: beautiful, hypnotic soundscapes that somehow hold a sense of abandon and a sense of being found.

“Our process was very, very organic. For both of us, it’s just about the creation. Each song has a little journey of its own. The vision’s beautiful between us because there’s a lot of trust. It’s a very intuitive process where we fall in love with one element of the song or one element of a thought, and we follow that until both of those ideas have been met.” – Ry X

Howling

In 2015, the collective Children of the Light from Holland will be building a live tour with Howling, creating a bespoke, interactive light setup.

[tracking] => [conversions] => [hide_preorder] => 0 [hide_tracks] => 0 [hide_buy] => 0 ) ) ) [8] => Array ( [Event] => Array ( [id] => 13944 [date] => 2015-05-22 [artist] => ODESZA [city] => Bradley [state] => California [country] => US [venue] => Lightning In A Bottle [promoter] => [description] => [ticket_url] => http://lightninginabottle.org/ [image_upload_id] => 19684 [created] => 2015-02-17 11:12:10 [modified] => 2015-02-17 11:12:10 [year_slug] => 2015 [month_slug] => may [day_slug] => 22 [slug] => odesza-bradley-lightning-in-a-bottle [description_clean] => [products_count] => 0 [hidden] => 0 [soldout] => 0 ) [Image] => Array ( [id] => 19684 [media_type] => image [artist] => ODESZA [title] => Odesza Press Shot 2014 [credits] => [buy_link] => [filename] => images/odesza/ODESZAbyTonjeThilesen.jpg [checksum] => c456cf3ecb3c0e2f802212dbf63f332b [mime_type] => image/jpeg [size] => 7634289 [external_url] => http://media.ninjatune.net/images/odesza/ODESZAbyTonjeThilesen.jpg [image_upload_id] => [first_track_id] => [first_release_id] => [listed] => 0 [active] => 0 [processed] => 1 [artist_slug] => odesza [slug] => odesza-press-shot-2014 [created] => 2014-07-15 18:26:41 [modified] => 2014-07-15 18:29:21 [embed] => ) [Country] => Array ( [id] => 122 [name] => United States [longname] => United States of America [numcode] => 840 [iso] => US [iso3] => USA [currency] => USD [active] => 1 [parent_id] => 117 [lft] => 241 [rght] => 242 [level] => 2 ) [Product] => Array ( ) [Artist] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => 210 [name] => ODESZA [description] =>

In 2012, a striking new voice emerged from the wider surge of electronic music in the U.S. ODESZA’s Summer’s Gone stood out from the crowd; it was a collection of songs, not just beats; and its irresistible, startling dreaminess, addictive drums and fathoms-deep bass set it apart from the by-the-numbers brutality of EDM’s also-rans. In an age of manufactured internet buzz and carefully plotted hype, ODESZA’s story was refreshingly authentic: A brilliant new duo unveiled their music on the internet, and the world paid attention.

Harrison Mills (aka CatacombKid) and Clayton Knight (aka BeachesBeaches) began recording together after meeting at Western Washington University. There was instant chemistry, and the pair worked prolifically, quickly carving out a distinctive, heady sound: glitched-out vocals, soaring, visceral melody and ear-gripping drums.  Two songs from Summer’s Gone – “How Did I Get Here” and “iPlayYouListen” – instantly leapt to number 1 on the Hype Machine Popular Chart. ODESZA began to make evangelical fans, with word of their music setting the world – both real and virtual – alight.

2013 saw the release of the My Friends Never Die EP, with three of the five tracks hitting #1 on Hype Machine. Relentless touring followed, including dates with Pretty Lights and Emancipator and numerous festival performances including Sasquatch Music Festival and Lightning In A Bottle. Thrown in at the deep end, ODESZA quickly honed a live craft to match that of their recordings.

The duo was playing to larger and larger crowds when Pretty Lights asked them to be the support act on the fall Pretty Lights tour, and to remix "One Day They'll Know," which also hit #1 on Hype Machine and #8 on the iTunes Electronic Chart.  Later in 2013, ODESZA selected their favourite producers for a follow up remix EP, My Friends Never Die Remixes, and launched the ambitious, ongoing mixtape series NO.SLEEP. 

February 2014 brought the release of the ODESZA single “Sun Models (feat. Madelyn Grant,)” taken from the duo’s forthcoming second album. This song continued the trend they’d set previously, and it too hit #1 on Hype Machine.  In March 2014 ODESZA’s remix of Pretty Lights’ “Lost And Found” was released on the DIVERGENT movie soundtrack, and (you guessed it!) hit #1 on Hype Machine.  

Harrison and Clayton headed back into the studio, putting the finishes touches to their forthcoming second album, before setting out on a sold out North American tour in Spring, culminating in a performance at Coachella. Not wanting to leave their growing legion of fans wanting, the duo’s remix of ZHU’s hit “Faded” was released, taking their #1s on the Hype Machine chart straight into double figures.

Summer 2014 saw ODESZA visit Australia to play a series of live dates, before heading back to North America for festivals, and to polish up and master their now hotly anticipated sophomore album. 

And finally that brand new album is here. In Return has more than just delivered on the promise of ODESZA’s previous work. A record with a precocious maturity and coherence, it’s a start-to-finish stunner of pop-infused, electronic wonder, littered with infectious hooks and potent atmosphere. Vocal performances from Zyra, Py and Shy Girls accompany that of Madelyn Grant on Sun Models, expertly worked into ODESZA’s trademark, mood-altering uplift. 

ODESZA developed a new live performance to accompany In Return, ensuring that the shows do full justice to the album. Their work ethic and constant evolution resulted in a sold out headline tour of North America this fall and has set them up for a successful first European tour. 2015 brings an even more ambitious live production which ODESZA will unveil at every major music festival across the United States. 

One of the stunning aspects of ODESZA is the speed with which they’ve created a large, devoted fanbase – testament to just how refreshing, immediate and exciting their music is. To date, ODESZA has earned 16 Hype Machine #1s, amassed over 35 million SoundCloud streams and 15.3 million Spotify plays in the last 60 days, and been licensed by Adidas, GoPro, Piz Buin and many more. In Return debuted at #1 on the Billboard Electronic chart, #42 on the Billboard Top 200 chart, # 1 on the iTunes Electronic Chart where it spent 15 days in a row, cracked the iTunes Electronic Chart Top 10 in 7 other countries outside the U.S., and reached #20 on the iTunes Overall Albums chart. Their breakout single, "Say My Name (feat. Zyra)," reached #1 on the Hype Machine popular chart twice, #1 on the Spotify US Viral Chart, #2 on the Spotify Global Chart and was named iTunes Single of the Week in many countries around the globe. The “Say My Name” video was named a Vimeo staff pick and saw airplay on MTV Hits, MTVU and Fuse. ODESZA has also been commissioned to make remixes for Charli XCX, Angus & Julia Stone and many more to come.

That’s a lot of people paying attention! In Return is everything fans might have hoped for and then some: An album that places ODESZA firmly in the vanguard of electronic music’s coming of age. 

“Despite the many voices featured on the album, the sound is unified under a groove, built on ODESZA’s multi-layered melodies, spaced-out beats and cinematic charm.” - TIME 

“Every track off of their latest album In Return hangs between blithe, ethereal spaces and thumping percussion, like fuzzy clouds punctuated by dope-ass thunder. The duo keep things unpredictable, never relying on same beat for too long, their music making you feel as if you’re being teleported into the future that's nostalgic for the past.” - Noisey

“Mixed in with their classic approach are a number of choice guest appearances and snazzy experiments that push the limits of their sound.” - Seattle Times 

“...a surging contra-EDM movement..the duo blend deep house, bass, garage, chill wave and glitch-hop into an occasionally nostalgic but always airy summer soundtrack.” - Herald Sun (Australia)

“There’s a certain finger-on-the-pulse feeling with ODESZA. Their grasp on the direction of electronic music sets them apart and they’re becoming the gold standard of acts born from sounds exchanged on the internet.” - Paste Magazine

“ODESZA has already demonstrated the ability to take root in the future and garage house genre as a power team to watch, and continues to showcase their forward thinking ear for the genre’s sound.” - Dancing Astronaut

[links] =>

inreturn.odesza.com

Facebook
Twitter
Soundcloud

[image_upload_id] => 19684 [label_id] => 5 [twitter_username] => odesza [instagram_id] => 272276842 [instagram_username] => odesza [link] => [listed] => 0 [sortname] => ODESZA [created] => 2014-07-14 21:14:03 [modified] => 2014-11-10 18:14:52 [slug] => odesza [fuga_id] => [description_clean] =>

In 2012, a striking new voice emerged from the wider surge of electronic music in the U.S. ODESZA’s Summer’s Gone stood out from the crowd; it was a collection of songs, not just beats; and its irresistible, startling dreaminess, addictive drums and fathoms-deep bass set it apart from the by-the-numbers brutality of EDM’s also-rans. In an age of manufactured internet buzz and carefully plotted hype, ODESZA’s story was refreshingly authentic: A brilliant new duo unveiled their music on the internet, and the world paid attention.

Harrison Mills (aka CatacombKid) and Clayton Knight (aka BeachesBeaches) began recording together after meeting at Western Washington University. There was instant chemistry, and the pair worked prolifically, quickly carving out a distinctive, heady sound: glitched-out vocals, soaring, visceral melody and ear-gripping drums.  Two songs from Summer’s Gone – “How Did I Get Here” and “iPlayYouListen” – instantly leapt to number 1 on the Hype Machine Popular Chart. ODESZA began to make evangelical fans, with word of their music setting the world – both real and virtual – alight.

2013 saw the release of the My Friends Never Die EP, with three of the five tracks hitting #1 on Hype Machine. Relentless touring followed, including dates with Pretty Lights and Emancipator and numerous festival performances including Sasquatch Music Festival and Lightning In A Bottle. Thrown in at the deep end, ODESZA quickly honed a live craft to match that of their recordings.

The duo was playing to larger and larger crowds when Pretty Lights asked them to be the support act on the fall Pretty Lights tour, and to remix "One Day They'll Know," which also hit #1 on Hype Machine and #8 on the iTunes Electronic Chart.  Later in 2013, ODESZA selected their favourite producers for a follow up remix EP, My Friends Never Die Remixes, and launched the ambitious, ongoing mixtape series NO.SLEEP. 

February 2014 brought the release of the ODESZA single “Sun Models (feat. Madelyn Grant,)” taken from the duo’s forthcoming second album. This song continued the trend they’d set previously, and it too hit #1 on Hype Machine.  In March 2014 ODESZA’s remix of Pretty Lights’ “Lost And Found” was released on the DIVERGENT movie soundtrack, and (you guessed it!) hit #1 on Hype Machine.  

Harrison and Clayton headed back into the studio, putting the finishes touches to their forthcoming second album, before setting out on a sold out North American tour in Spring, culminating in a performance at Coachella. Not wanting to leave their growing legion of fans wanting, the duo’s remix of ZHU’s hit “Faded” was released, taking their #1s on the Hype Machine chart straight into double figures.

Summer 2014 saw ODESZA visit Australia to play a series of live dates, before heading back to North America for festivals, and to polish up and master their now hotly anticipated sophomore album. 

And finally that brand new album is here. In Return has more than just delivered on the promise of ODESZA’s previous work. A record with a precocious maturity and coherence, it’s a start-to-finish stunner of pop-infused, electronic wonder, littered with infectious hooks and potent atmosphere. Vocal performances from Zyra, Py and Shy Girls accompany that of Madelyn Grant on Sun Models, expertly worked into ODESZA’s trademark, mood-altering uplift. 

ODESZA developed a new live performance to accompany In Return, ensuring that the shows do full justice to the album. Their work ethic and constant evolution resulted in a sold out headline tour of North America this fall and has set them up for a successful first European tour. 2015 brings an even more ambitious live production which ODESZA will unveil at every major music festival across the United States. 

One of the stunning aspects of ODESZA is the speed with which they’ve created a large, devoted fanbase – testament to just how refreshing, immediate and exciting their music is. To date, ODESZA has earned 16 Hype Machine #1s, amassed over 35 million SoundCloud streams and 15.3 million Spotify plays in the last 60 days, and been licensed by Adidas, GoPro, Piz Buin and many more. In Return debuted at #1 on the Billboard Electronic chart, #42 on the Billboard Top 200 chart, # 1 on the iTunes Electronic Chart where it spent 15 days in a row, cracked the iTunes Electronic Chart Top 10 in 7 other countries outside the U.S., and reached #20 on the iTunes Overall Albums chart. Their breakout single, "Say My Name (feat. Zyra)," reached #1 on the Hype Machine popular chart twice, #1 on the Spotify US Viral Chart, #2 on the Spotify Global Chart and was named iTunes Single of the Week in many countries around the globe. The “Say My Name” video was named a Vimeo staff pick and saw airplay on MTV Hits, MTVU and Fuse. ODESZA has also been commissioned to make remixes for Charli XCX, Angus & Julia Stone and many more to come.

That’s a lot of people paying attention! In Return is everything fans might have hoped for and then some: An album that places ODESZA firmly in the vanguard of electronic music’s coming of age. 

“Despite the many voices featured on the album, the sound is unified under a groove, built on ODESZA’s multi-layered melodies, spaced-out beats and cinematic charm.” - TIME 

“Every track off of their latest album In Return hangs between blithe, ethereal spaces and thumping percussion, like fuzzy clouds punctuated by dope-ass thunder. The duo keep things unpredictable, never relying on same beat for too long, their music making you feel as if you’re being teleported into the future that's nostalgic for the past.” - Noisey

“Mixed in with their classic approach are a number of choice guest appearances and snazzy experiments that push the limits of their sound.” - Seattle Times 

“...a surging contra-EDM movement..the duo blend deep house, bass, garage, chill wave and glitch-hop into an occasionally nostalgic but always airy summer soundtrack.” - Herald Sun (Australia)

“There’s a certain finger-on-the-pulse feeling with ODESZA. Their grasp on the direction of electronic music sets them apart and they’re becoming the gold standard of acts born from sounds exchanged on the internet.” - Paste Magazine

“ODESZA has already demonstrated the ability to take root in the future and garage house genre as a power team to watch, and continues to showcase their forward thinking ear for the genre’s sound.” - Dancing Astronaut

[links_clean] =>

inreturn.odesza.com

Facebook
Twitter
Soundcloud

[counter_player] => [counter_biog] =>

In 2012, a striking new voice emerged from the wider surge of electronic music in the U.S. ODESZA’s Summer’s Gone stood out from the crowd; it was a collection of songs, not just beats; and its irresistible, startling dreaminess, addictive drums and fathoms-deep bass set it apart from the by-the-numbers brutality of EDM’s also-rans. In an age of manufactured internet buzz and carefully plotted hype, ODESZA’s story was refreshingly authentic: A brilliant new duo unveiled their music on the internet, and the world paid attention.

Harrison Mills (aka CatacombKid) and Clayton Knight (aka BeachesBeaches) began recording together after meeting at Western Washington University. There was instant chemistry, and the pair worked prolifically, quickly carving out a distinctive, heady sound: glitched-out vocals, soaring, visceral melody and ear-gripping drums.  Two songs from Summer’s Gone – “How Did I Get Here” and “iPlayYouListen” – instantly leapt to number 1 on the Hype Machine Popular Chart. ODESZA began to make evangelical fans, with word of their music setting the world – both real and virtual – alight.

2013 saw the release of the My Friends Never Die EP, with three of the five tracks hitting #1 on Hype Machine. Relentless touring followed, including dates with Pretty Lights and Emancipator and numerous festival performances including Sasquatch Music Festival and Lightning In A Bottle. Thrown in at the deep end, ODESZA quickly honed a live craft to match that of their recordings.

The duo was playing to larger and larger crowds when Pretty Lights asked them to be the support act on the fall Pretty Lights tour, and to remix "One Day They'll Know," which also hit #1 on Hype Machine and #8 on the iTunes Electronic Chart.  Later in 2013, ODESZA selected their favourite producers for a follow up remix EP, My Friends Never Die Remixes, and launched the ambitious, ongoing mixtape series NO.SLEEP. 

February 2014 brought the release of the ODESZA single “Sun Models (feat. Madelyn Grant,)” taken from the duo’s forthcoming second album. This song continued the trend they’d set previously, and it too hit #1 on Hype Machine.  In March 2014 ODESZA’s remix of Pretty Lights’ “Lost And Found” was released on the DIVERGENT movie soundtrack, and (you guessed it!) hit #1 on Hype Machine.  

Harrison and Clayton headed back into the studio, putting the finishes touches to their forthcoming second album, before setting out on a sold out North American tour in Spring, culminating in a performance at Coachella. Not wanting to leave their growing legion of fans wanting, the duo’s remix of ZHU’s hit “Faded” was released, taking their #1s on the Hype Machine chart straight into double figures.

 

Summer 2014 saw ODESZA visit Australia to play a series of live dates, before heading back to North America for festivals, and to polish up and master their now hotly anticipated sophomore album. 

And finally that brand new album is here. In Return has more than just delivered on the promise of ODESZA’s previous work. A record with a precocious maturity and coherence, it’s a start-to-finish stunner of pop-infused, electronic wonder, littered with infectious hooks and potent atmosphere. Vocal performances from Zyra, Py and Shy Girls accompany that of Madelyn Grant on Sun Models, expertly worked into ODESZA’s trademark, mood-altering uplift. 

ODESZA developed a new live performance to accompany In Return, ensuring that the shows do full justice to the album. Their work ethic and constant evolution resulted in a sold out headline tour of North America this fall and has set them up for a successful first European tour. 2015 brings an even more ambitious live production which ODESZA will unveil at every major music festival across the United States. 

One of the stunning aspects of ODESZA is the speed with which they’ve created a large, devoted fanbase – testament to just how refreshing, immediate and exciting their music is. To date, ODESZA has earned 16 Hype Machine #1s, amassed over 35 million SoundCloud streams and 15.3 million Spotify plays in the last 60 days, and been licensed by Adidas, GoPro, Piz Buin and many more. In Return debuted at #1 on the Billboard Electronic chart, #42 on the Billboard Top 200 chart, # 1 on the iTunes Electronic Chart where it spent 15 days in a row, cracked the iTunes Electronic Chart Top 10 in 7 other countries outside the U.S., and reached #20 on the iTunes Overall Albums chart. Their breakout single, "Say My Name (feat. Zyra)," reached #1 on the Hype Machine popular chart twice, #1 on the Spotify US Viral Chart, #2 on the Spotify Global Chart and was named iTunes Single of the Week in many countries around the globe. The “Say My Name” video was named a Vimeo staff pick and saw airplay on MTV Hits, MTVU and Fuse. ODESZA has also been commissioned to make remixes for Charli XCX, Angus & Julia Stone and many more to come.

That’s a lot of people paying attention! In Return is everything fans might have hoped for and then some: An album that places ODESZA firmly in the vanguard of electronic music’s coming of age. 

“Despite the many voices featured on the album, the sound is unified under a groove, built on ODESZA’s multi-layered melodies, spaced-out beats and cinematic charm.” - TIME 

“Every track off of their latest album In Return hangs between blithe, ethereal spaces and thumping percussion, like fuzzy clouds punctuated by dope-ass thunder. The duo keep things unpredictable, never relying on same beat for too long, their music making you feel as if you’re being teleported into the future that's nostalgic for the past.” - Noisey

“Mixed in with their classic approach are a number of choice guest appearances and snazzy experiments that push the limits of their sound.” - Seattle Times 

“...a surging contra-EDM movement..the duo blend deep house, bass, garage, chill wave and glitch-hop into an occasionally nostalgic but always airy summer soundtrack.” - Herald Sun (Australia)

“There’s a certain finger-on-the-pulse feeling with ODESZA. Their grasp on the direction of electronic music sets them apart and they’re becoming the gold standard of acts born from sounds exchanged on the internet.” - Paste Magazine

“ODESZA has already demonstrated the ability to take root in the future and garage house genre as a power team to watch, and continues to showcase their forward thinking ear for the genre’s sound.” - Dancing Astronaut

[tracking] => [conversions] => [hide_preorder] => 0 [hide_tracks] => 0 [hide_buy] => 0 ) ) ) [9] => Array ( [Event] => Array ( [id] => 13694 [date] => 2015-05-23 [artist] => Young Fathers [city] => Galloway [state] => [country] => GB [venue] => Knockengorroch [promoter] => [description] => [ticket_url] => http://www.knockengorroch.org.uk/tickets/ [image_upload_id] => 20388 [created] => 2014-12-11 17:14:36 [modified] => 2014-12-15 11:45:40 [year_slug] => 2015 [month_slug] => may [day_slug] => 23 [slug] => young-fathers-galloway-knockengorroch [description_clean] => [products_count] => 0 [hidden] => 0 [soldout] => 0 ) [Image] => Array ( [id] => 20388 [media_type] => image [artist] => Young Fathers [title] => Press Photo 2014 [credits] => [buy_link] => [filename] => images/young-fathers/enhanced-buzz-wide-4638-1418225100-8.jpg [checksum] => 7f04064f4f5043ce309e2cc208c547c9 [mime_type] => image/jpeg [size] => 88629 [external_url] => [image_upload_id] => [first_track_id] => [first_release_id] => [listed] => 0 [active] => 0 [processed] => 1 [artist_slug] => young-fathers [slug] => press-photo-2014-8 [created] => 2014-12-11 16:04:36 [modified] => 2014-12-11 16:04:37 [embed] => ) [Country] => Array ( [id] => 208 [name] => United Kingdom [longname] => United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland [numcode] => 826 [iso] => GB [iso3] => GBR [currency] => GBP [active] => 1 [parent_id] => 191 [lft] => 413 [rght] => 414 [level] => 2 ) [Product] => Array ( ) [Artist] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => 198 [name] => Young Fathers [description] =>

Young Fathers were christened in 2008, named after the fact that all three members were named for their fathers..

They are:

‘G’ Hastings, from Drylaw, Edinburgh, Alloysious Massaquoi, originally from Liberia via Ghana and Kayus Bankole, born in Edinburgh to Nigerian parents but partially raised in Maryland in the USA, all 27 years old. Their live shows are complimented by Steven Morrison (drums & DJ) and Lauren Holt (AKA LAWholt - vocals).

The group formed after meeting at an under-16s hiphop night at the infamous Bongo Club in Edinburgh when they were all 14 years old. Almost immediately they started writing and recording together, initially on an old karoake machine plugged into a cheap cassette recorderat G’s parents house.

After going through various guises over several years and after hooking up with a local production company, they eventually settled on the name Young Fathers and recorded their first album with Tim Brinkhurst (AKA London) as producer. The recordings included their first single, Straight Back On It, which was given a limited release in 2009 and was received well enough to get them a couple of TV appearances, plays on BBC radio, some festival dates and the support slots with Simian Mobile Disco and Esser on UK tours.

Straight Back On It, a bang-on-the-money pop song built around Afrika Bambaataa’s reworking of Kraftwerk, was indicative of the rest of the album, Inconceivable Child… Conceived, in as much as the album was a state of the art teenage pop collection. Unfortunately the album was never released; however, another single, separately recorded, Automatic, was given a limited online release, but failed to have much impact.

In 2011 and after writing and recording yet another, unreleased album, the group decided a radical change was necessary and they finally disconnected themselves from the local production company and took control of their destiny. Recording mini-album (or ‘mixtape’ as it was called) TAPE ONE in just over a week, finishing a track a day and having it available for download within two weeks of recording gave them renewed vigour. They quickly followed this up by recording TAPE TWO in a similar fashion. Los Angeles based alt-hiphop label, Anticon, discovered them online and within a few months had signed them up for a short deal that saw both TAPEs officially released in 2013.

The group, meanwhile, continued to tour, gathering an impressive reputation as a fierce live act. They played all over Europe and made their US debut at SxSW in Austin, Texas, in March 2013.

Following support from the BBC’s Zane Lowe and Lauren Laverne, and an appearance on influential USA talk show, Jimmy Kimmel in 2014, TAPE TWO won Scottish Album Of The Year (‘The SAY Award’) and this was followed by their latest album, DEAD, released this time on Anticon in the USA and Big Dada in the UK and Europe, receiving the Mercury Award for best album of 2014. They won as the underdogs and there was a minor controversy because they didn’t look particularly joyful at the presentation and because they refused to speak to some of the more right wing press covering the event.

Immediately after winning the Mercury, YFs travelled to Berlin where they continued making their new album in a freezing basement in a building near the railway yards. Returning to the more familiar (and warmer) basement studio in Edinburgh where most of their recordings were made, to finish the album, they ended 2014 by playing a home town show at Edinburgh’s Hogmanay New year’s Eve festival in front of several thousand people.

The new album, White Men Are Black Men Too, has been recorded at various places around the world, including Melbourne and London as well as Berlin and Edinburgh and features the Leith Congregational Choir on a couple of tracks.

Young Fathers played over 140 shows during 2014, including On Blackheath Festival (curated by Massive Attack). They toured the UK, large swathes of Europe and did a six week stint in the USA. The new year already has them booked to play even more. White Men Are Black Men Too is due for release in April.

[links] => [image_upload_id] => 20542 [label_id] => 2 [twitter_username] => youngfathers [instagram_id] => [instagram_username] => [link] => [listed] => 1 [sortname] => Young Fathers [created] => 2013-10-18 16:52:18 [modified] => 2015-03-31 14:34:35 [slug] => young-fathers [fuga_id] => [description_clean] =>

Young Fathers were christened in 2008, named after the fact that all three members were named for their fathers..

They are:

‘G’ Hastings, from Drylaw, Edinburgh, Alloysious Massaquoi, originally from Liberia via Ghana and Kayus Bankole, born in Edinburgh to Nigerian parents but partially raised in Maryland in the USA, all 27 years old. Their live shows are complimented by Steven Morrison (drums & DJ) and Lauren Holt (AKA LAWholt - vocals).

The group formed after meeting at an under-16s hiphop night at the infamous Bongo Club in Edinburgh when they were all 14 years old. Almost immediately they started writing and recording together, initially on an old karoake machine plugged into a cheap cassette recorderat G’s parents house.

After going through various guises over several years and after hooking up with a local production company, they eventually settled on the name Young Fathers and recorded their first album with Tim Brinkhurst (AKA London) as producer. The recordings included their first single, Straight Back On It, which was given a limited release in 2009 and was received well enough to get them a couple of TV appearances, plays on BBC radio, some festival dates and the support slots with Simian Mobile Disco and Esser on UK tours.

Straight Back On It, a bang-on-the-money pop song built around Afrika Bambaataa’s reworking of Kraftwerk, was indicative of the rest of the album, Inconceivable Child… Conceived, in as much as the album was a state of the art teenage pop collection. Unfortunately the album was never released; however, another single, separately recorded, Automatic, was given a limited online release, but failed to have much impact.

In 2011 and after writing and recording yet another, unreleased album, the group decided a radical change was necessary and they finally disconnected themselves from the local production company and took control of their destiny. Recording mini-album (or ‘mixtape’ as it was called) TAPE ONE in just over a week, finishing a track a day and having it available for download within two weeks of recording gave them renewed vigour. They quickly followed this up by recording TAPE TWO in a similar fashion. Los Angeles based alt-hiphop label, Anticon, discovered them online and within a few months had signed them up for a short deal that saw both TAPEs officially released in 2013.

The group, meanwhile, continued to tour, gathering an impressive reputation as a fierce live act. They played all over Europe and made their US debut at SxSW in Austin, Texas, in March 2013.

Following support from the BBC’s Zane Lowe and Lauren Laverne, and an appearance on influential USA talk show, Jimmy Kimmel in 2014, TAPE TWO won Scottish Album Of The Year (‘The SAY Award’) and this was followed by their latest album, DEAD, released this time on Anticon in the USA and Big Dada in the UK and Europe, receiving the Mercury Award for best album of 2014. They won as the underdogs and there was a minor controversy because they didn’t look particularly joyful at the presentation and because they refused to speak to some of the more right wing press covering the event.

Immediately after winning the Mercury, YFs travelled to Berlin where they continued making their new album in a freezing basement in a building near the railway yards. Returning to the more familiar (and warmer) basement studio in Edinburgh where most of their recordings were made, to finish the album, they ended 2014 by playing a home town show at Edinburgh’s Hogmanay New year’s Eve festival in front of several thousand people.

The new album, White Men Are Black Men Too, has been recorded at various places around the world, including Melbourne and London as well as Berlin and Edinburgh and features the Leith Congregational Choir on a couple of tracks.

Young Fathers played over 140 shows during 2014, including On Blackheath Festival (curated by Massive Attack). They toured the UK, large swathes of Europe and did a six week stint in the USA. The new year already has them booked to play even more. White Men Are Black Men Too is due for release in April.

[links_clean] => [counter_player] => [counter_biog] => [tracking] => [conversions] => [hide_preorder] => 0 [hide_tracks] => 0 [hide_buy] => 0 ) ) ) [10] => Array ( [Event] => Array ( [id] => 13703 [date] => 2015-05-23 [artist] => The Cinematic Orchestra [city] => London [state] => [country] => GB [venue] => The Roundhouse [promoter] => [description] =>

Tickets go on sale 10am Friday 9th January

[ticket_url] => http://www.soundcrashmusic.com/cinematic-orchestra/ [image_upload_id] => 20419 [created] => 2015-01-05 12:15:13 [modified] => 2015-01-08 15:30:18 [year_slug] => 2015 [month_slug] => may [day_slug] => 23 [slug] => the-cinematic-orchestra-london-the-roundhouse-2 [description_clean] =>

Tickets go on sale 10am Friday 9th January

[products_count] => 0 [hidden] => 0 [soldout] => 0 ) [Image] => Array ( [id] => 20419 [media_type] => image [artist] => The Cinematic Orchestra [title] => Roundhouse May 2015 [credits] => [buy_link] => [filename] => images/the-cinematic-orchestra/Cinematic-Orchestra-v1-1-1-copy-jpg.jpg [checksum] => 27791c77cac71bfbbde4ae3e49a1262c [mime_type] => image/jpeg [size] => 131072 [external_url] => [image_upload_id] => [first_track_id] => [first_release_id] => [listed] => 0 [active] => 0 [processed] => 1 [artist_slug] => the-cinematic-orchestra [slug] => roundhouse-may-2015 [created] => 2015-01-08 13:57:07 [modified] => 2015-01-09 10:22:24 [embed] => ) [Country] => Array ( [id] => 208 [name] => United Kingdom [longname] => United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland [numcode] => 826 [iso] => GB [iso3] => GBR [currency] => GBP [active] => 1 [parent_id] => 191 [lft] => 413 [rght] => 414 [level] => 2 ) [Product] => Array ( ) [Artist] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => 32 [name] => The Cinematic Orchestra [description] =>

Background: The aptly-named Cinematic Orchestra (TCO) were formed by J. Swinscoe back in 1999. At the time Jay was still an employee at Ninja Tune in South London, where he was responsible for export sales at the long-standing independent record label. Swinscoe arrived at London Bridge from Scotland via Yorkshire and Cardiff with a background playing bass and guitar in bands and DJing, as well as a head full of ideas and influences, such as his love of jazz bass players, rhythm sections and film soundtracks. So while he knocked out Mr. Scruff and Coldcut records to Spain and Scandinavia by day, he began putting together the TCO album in his downtime. 

‘Motion’: Taking on the role of bandleader, Swinscoe rallied a group of adventurous jazz players and delivered a debut album that took everyone by surprise and was voted album of the year by listeners to Gilles Peterson’s Radio One show. It’s a record which emphasises the ‘cinematic’ in the Cinematic Orchestra, with Uncut likening it to "every hard-boiled, neon-lit Hollywood thriller you’ve seen, the sound of a thousand femmes fatales, doomed P.I.’s and bitter plot twists remixed and refashioned in one ingeniously sampled audio narrative". 

‘Every Day’: If ‘Motion’ reflected the cinematic aspect of TCO, their second album ‘Every Day’, brought out more of the orchestral side, too. Arguably a more refined record than its predecessor, it is uncompromising in its approach nonetheless. On ‘Every Day’, Swinscoe worked with bass player Phil France as his co-pilot and co-producer, France’s background in jazz the perfect counterpoint to Swinscoe’s technical knowhow and emphasis on raw emotion. The pair flew out to St. Louis to record the legendary Fontella Bass (of ‘Rescue Me’ and Art Ensemble of Chicago fame) for the single ‘All That You Give’ and ‘Evolution’, both of which appeared on the album. Closer to home, they enlisted the talents of Mercury and Brit nominated South London rapper Roots Manuva on the soul searching ‘All Things To All Men’. 

Live: In the last three years the Cinematics’ have played far and wide at every conceivable type of venue and on all kinds of occasion. They have shocked out from the Jazz Café to the Jazz Bop via Ronnie Scott’s. And in somewhat hardcore fashion they toured the North American Jazz Festival circuit in the back of a transit van, with the dates culminating in a prestigious support slot for John McLaughlin in Central Park. 

They have toured in Germany, Japan, Italy and Portugal. They have also clocked up the music festival mileage appearing at, amongst others, Homelands and Essential (UK), Sonar (Spain), Celerico De Basto (Portugal), North Sea Jazz and Drum Rhythm (Holland), Cannes (France), Fuji Rock (Japan) and Montreux (Switzerland) and have headlined The Big Chill twice. Other live highlights include playing at the presentation of a Lifetime Achievement Award for Stanley Kubrick by the Directors Guild. 

‘Man With A Movie Camera’: Suitably enough for a group who have become something of a household name in Portugal, Swinscoe and co. were commissioned to write and perform a new score for Dziga Vertov’s avant garde 1929 silent film ‘Man With The Movie Camera’, as the opening event celebrating the northern Portuguese city of Porto’s year as European City of Culture for 2001. 

As a big fan of film soundtracks, Jay set about the mission with great enthusiasm. Following some frenzied rehearsals somewhere in South East London, the band performed Swinscoe’s soundtrack live in Porto’s splendid Coliseu theatre in May 2000 in front of an audience of 3500 and received a tumultuous ten minute standing ovation for their troubles. 

In November 2002, Swinscoe was fortunate enough to come by some downtime at legendary specialist soundtrack studio, Whitfield Street in London. Over two days the Cinematics, along with a string section and percussionist Milo Fell, laid down what Swinscoe and France hope will be their definitive version of the soundtrack. This was released with the movie on DVD by Ninja Tune in the spring of 2003. 

Travel: In 2004, Swinscoe relocated to Paris, which slightly altered the balance of work between himself and France during the making of “Ma Fleur” (and was also responsible for its French title). Then in 2006 he moved again, this time to Brooklyn, New York. Jason is the first to acknowledge that this has had a direct impact on his creativity: “I think the cities I’ve lived in have had an effect on my perspective both personally and musically. The dynamics of a city changes the energy and pace of all things, but particularly music.” 

‘Ma Fleur’: In Paris, Jason began work on the instrumentals, which would form the basis of his new record. Having completed a rough version by early 2005, he gave this to a friend who disappeared for 3 weeks and came back with short story scripts in which each track represented a scene. Jason then took this and worked some more on the tracks, and in turn gave this back to his scriptwriter, the two aspects of the project developing alongside one another. This yet-to-be-made movie gave Jason the emotional and narrative impetus he needed to develop the pieces and, in particular, led him even further into his exploration of song than he had previously gone. “For me, I think it became a natural evolution to enquire into that whole new world of the song form,” he says. “Also I think the ‘sceenplay’ experiment led to a need for a much more direct relationship to words and stories. So it still has links with film and narrative, in fact was driven by it.” 

The Current Band: Over the years, the membership of Cinematic Orchestra has gradually evolved. Alongside core members Swinscoe and Phil France is Tom Chant, a fixture at left of centre jazz gigs all over the world, saxophonist Chant is known as one of the UK’s top free jazz players. For ‘Every Day’ young drumming legend Luke Flowers was recruited, who had played together with France for a number of years as youthful stars on the northern jazz circuit. New members for the current incarnation of TCO are Nick Ramm - a pianist from London who has played with Matthew Herbert amongst many others – and Stuart McCallum, a guitarist from Manchester, whose subtle, six string antics have slightly changed the dynamics of TCO’s sound on their new record. The shows will also feature vocals from Patrick Watson and special guests on selected dates.

[links] =>

www.cinematicorchestra.com

Facebook

[image_upload_id] => 18732 [label_id] => 1 [twitter_username] => [instagram_id] => [instagram_username] => [link] => [listed] => 1 [sortname] => Cinematic Orchestra [created] => 2010-07-17 22:15:58 [modified] => 2014-02-21 15:15:55 [slug] => the-cinematic-orchestra [fuga_id] => [description_clean] =>

Background: The aptly-named Cinematic Orchestra (TCO) were formed by J. Swinscoe back in 1999. At the time Jay was still an employee at Ninja Tune in South London, where he was responsible for export sales at the long-standing independent record label. Swinscoe arrived at London Bridge from Scotland via Yorkshire and Cardiff with a background playing bass and guitar in bands and DJing, as well as a head full of ideas and influences, such as his love of jazz bass players, rhythm sections and film soundtracks. So while he knocked out Mr. Scruff and Coldcut records to Spain and Scandinavia by day, he began putting together the TCO album in his downtime. 

‘Motion’: Taking on the role of bandleader, Swinscoe rallied a group of adventurous jazz players and delivered a debut album that took everyone by surprise and was voted album of the year by listeners to Gilles Peterson’s Radio One show. It’s a record which emphasises the ‘cinematic’ in the Cinematic Orchestra, with Uncut likening it to "every hard-boiled, neon-lit Hollywood thriller you’ve seen, the sound of a thousand femmes fatales, doomed P.I.’s and bitter plot twists remixed and refashioned in one ingeniously sampled audio narrative". 

‘Every Day’: If ‘Motion’ reflected the cinematic aspect of TCO, their second album ‘Every Day’, brought out more of the orchestral side, too. Arguably a more refined record than its predecessor, it is uncompromising in its approach nonetheless. On ‘Every Day’, Swinscoe worked with bass player Phil France as his co-pilot and co-producer, France’s background in jazz the perfect counterpoint to Swinscoe’s technical knowhow and emphasis on raw emotion. The pair flew out to St. Louis to record the legendary Fontella Bass (of ‘Rescue Me’ and Art Ensemble of Chicago fame) for the single ‘All That You Give’ and ‘Evolution’, both of which appeared on the album. Closer to home, they enlisted the talents of Mercury and Brit nominated South London rapper Roots Manuva on the soul searching ‘All Things To All Men’. 

Live: In the last three years the Cinematics’ have played far and wide at every conceivable type of venue and on all kinds of occasion. They have shocked out from the Jazz Café to the Jazz Bop via Ronnie Scott’s. And in somewhat hardcore fashion they toured the North American Jazz Festival circuit in the back of a transit van, with the dates culminating in a prestigious support slot for John McLaughlin in Central Park. 

They have toured in Germany, Japan, Italy and Portugal. They have also clocked up the music festival mileage appearing at, amongst others, Homelands and Essential (UK), Sonar (Spain), Celerico De Basto (Portugal), North Sea Jazz and Drum Rhythm (Holland), Cannes (France), Fuji Rock (Japan) and Montreux (Switzerland) and have headlined The Big Chill twice. Other live highlights include playing at the presentation of a Lifetime Achievement Award for Stanley Kubrick by the Directors Guild. 

‘Man With A Movie Camera’: Suitably enough for a group who have become something of a household name in Portugal, Swinscoe and co. were commissioned to write and perform a new score for Dziga Vertov’s avant garde 1929 silent film ‘Man With The Movie Camera’, as the opening event celebrating the northern Portuguese city of Porto’s year as European City of Culture for 2001. 

As a big fan of film soundtracks, Jay set about the mission with great enthusiasm. Following some frenzied rehearsals somewhere in South East London, the band performed Swinscoe’s soundtrack live in Porto’s splendid Coliseu theatre in May 2000 in front of an audience of 3500 and received a tumultuous ten minute standing ovation for their troubles. 

In November 2002, Swinscoe was fortunate enough to come by some downtime at legendary specialist soundtrack studio, Whitfield Street in London. Over two days the Cinematics, along with a string section and percussionist Milo Fell, laid down what Swinscoe and France hope will be their definitive version of the soundtrack. This was released with the movie on DVD by Ninja Tune in the spring of 2003. 

Travel: In 2004, Swinscoe relocated to Paris, which slightly altered the balance of work between himself and France during the making of “Ma Fleur” (and was also responsible for its French title). Then in 2006 he moved again, this time to Brooklyn, New York. Jason is the first to acknowledge that this has had a direct impact on his creativity: “I think the cities I’ve lived in have had an effect on my perspective both personally and musically. The dynamics of a city changes the energy and pace of all things, but particularly music.” 

‘Ma Fleur’: In Paris, Jason began work on the instrumentals, which would form the basis of his new record. Having completed a rough version by early 2005, he gave this to a friend who disappeared for 3 weeks and came back with short story scripts in which each track represented a scene. Jason then took this and worked some more on the tracks, and in turn gave this back to his scriptwriter, the two aspects of the project developing alongside one another. This yet-to-be-made movie gave Jason the emotional and narrative impetus he needed to develop the pieces and, in particular, led him even further into his exploration of song than he had previously gone. “For me, I think it became a natural evolution to enquire into that whole new world of the song form,” he says. “Also I think the ‘sceenplay’ experiment led to a need for a much more direct relationship to words and stories. So it still has links with film and narrative, in fact was driven by it.” 

The Current Band: Over the years, the membership of Cinematic Orchestra has gradually evolved. Alongside core members Swinscoe and Phil France is Tom Chant, a fixture at left of centre jazz gigs all over the world, saxophonist Chant is known as one of the UK’s top free jazz players. For ‘Every Day’ young drumming legend Luke Flowers was recruited, who had played together with France for a number of years as youthful stars on the northern jazz circuit. New members for the current incarnation of TCO are Nick Ramm - a pianist from London who has played with Matthew Herbert amongst many others – and Stuart McCallum, a guitarist from Manchester, whose subtle, six string antics have slightly changed the dynamics of TCO’s sound on their new record. The shows will also feature vocals from Patrick Watson and special guests on selected dates.

[links_clean] =>

www.cinematicorchestra.com

Facebook

[counter_player] => [counter_biog] => [tracking] => [conversions] => [hide_preorder] => 0 [hide_tracks] => 0 [hide_buy] => 0 ) ) ) [11] => Array ( [Event] => Array ( [id] => 13945 [date] => 2015-05-23 [artist] => ODESZA [city] => Quincy [state] => Washington [country] => US [venue] => Sasquatch Festival [promoter] => [description] => [ticket_url] => http://sasquatchfestival.com/ [image_upload_id] => 19684 [created] => 2015-02-17 11:13:54 [modified] => 2015-02-17 11:13:54 [year_slug] => 2015 [month_slug] => may [day_slug] => 23 [slug] => odesza-quincy-sasquatch-festival [description_clean] => [products_count] => 0 [hidden] => 0 [soldout] => 0 ) [Image] => Array ( [id] => 19684 [media_type] => image [artist] => ODESZA [title] => Odesza Press Shot 2014 [credits] => [buy_link] => [filename] => images/odesza/ODESZAbyTonjeThilesen.jpg [checksum] => c456cf3ecb3c0e2f802212dbf63f332b [mime_type] => image/jpeg [size] => 7634289 [external_url] => http://media.ninjatune.net/images/odesza/ODESZAbyTonjeThilesen.jpg [image_upload_id] => [first_track_id] => [first_release_id] => [listed] => 0 [active] => 0 [processed] => 1 [artist_slug] => odesza [slug] => odesza-press-shot-2014 [created] => 2014-07-15 18:26:41 [modified] => 2014-07-15 18:29:21 [embed] => ) [Country] => Array ( [id] => 122 [name] => United States [longname] => United States of America [numcode] => 840 [iso] => US [iso3] => USA [currency] => USD [active] => 1 [parent_id] => 117 [lft] => 241 [rght] => 242 [level] => 2 ) [Product] => Array ( ) [Artist] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => 210 [name] => ODESZA [description] =>

In 2012, a striking new voice emerged from the wider surge of electronic music in the U.S. ODESZA’s Summer’s Gone stood out from the crowd; it was a collection of songs, not just beats; and its irresistible, startling dreaminess, addictive drums and fathoms-deep bass set it apart from the by-the-numbers brutality of EDM’s also-rans. In an age of manufactured internet buzz and carefully plotted hype, ODESZA’s story was refreshingly authentic: A brilliant new duo unveiled their music on the internet, and the world paid attention.

Harrison Mills (aka CatacombKid) and Clayton Knight (aka BeachesBeaches) began recording together after meeting at Western Washington University. There was instant chemistry, and the pair worked prolifically, quickly carving out a distinctive, heady sound: glitched-out vocals, soaring, visceral melody and ear-gripping drums.  Two songs from Summer’s Gone – “How Did I Get Here” and “iPlayYouListen” – instantly leapt to number 1 on the Hype Machine Popular Chart. ODESZA began to make evangelical fans, with word of their music setting the world – both real and virtual – alight.

2013 saw the release of the My Friends Never Die EP, with three of the five tracks hitting #1 on Hype Machine. Relentless touring followed, including dates with Pretty Lights and Emancipator and numerous festival performances including Sasquatch Music Festival and Lightning In A Bottle. Thrown in at the deep end, ODESZA quickly honed a live craft to match that of their recordings.

The duo was playing to larger and larger crowds when Pretty Lights asked them to be the support act on the fall Pretty Lights tour, and to remix "One Day They'll Know," which also hit #1 on Hype Machine and #8 on the iTunes Electronic Chart.  Later in 2013, ODESZA selected their favourite producers for a follow up remix EP, My Friends Never Die Remixes, and launched the ambitious, ongoing mixtape series NO.SLEEP. 

February 2014 brought the release of the ODESZA single “Sun Models (feat. Madelyn Grant,)” taken from the duo’s forthcoming second album. This song continued the trend they’d set previously, and it too hit #1 on Hype Machine.  In March 2014 ODESZA’s remix of Pretty Lights’ “Lost And Found” was released on the DIVERGENT movie soundtrack, and (you guessed it!) hit #1 on Hype Machine.  

Harrison and Clayton headed back into the studio, putting the finishes touches to their forthcoming second album, before setting out on a sold out North American tour in Spring, culminating in a performance at Coachella. Not wanting to leave their growing legion of fans wanting, the duo’s remix of ZHU’s hit “Faded” was released, taking their #1s on the Hype Machine chart straight into double figures.

Summer 2014 saw ODESZA visit Australia to play a series of live dates, before heading back to North America for festivals, and to polish up and master their now hotly anticipated sophomore album. 

And finally that brand new album is here. In Return has more than just delivered on the promise of ODESZA’s previous work. A record with a precocious maturity and coherence, it’s a start-to-finish stunner of pop-infused, electronic wonder, littered with infectious hooks and potent atmosphere. Vocal performances from Zyra, Py and Shy Girls accompany that of Madelyn Grant on Sun Models, expertly worked into ODESZA’s trademark, mood-altering uplift. 

ODESZA developed a new live performance to accompany In Return, ensuring that the shows do full justice to the album. Their work ethic and constant evolution resulted in a sold out headline tour of North America this fall and has set them up for a successful first European tour. 2015 brings an even more ambitious live production which ODESZA will unveil at every major music festival across the United States. 

One of the stunning aspects of ODESZA is the speed with which they’ve created a large, devoted fanbase – testament to just how refreshing, immediate and exciting their music is. To date, ODESZA has earned 16 Hype Machine #1s, amassed over 35 million SoundCloud streams and 15.3 million Spotify plays in the last 60 days, and been licensed by Adidas, GoPro, Piz Buin and many more. In Return debuted at #1 on the Billboard Electronic chart, #42 on the Billboard Top 200 chart, # 1 on the iTunes Electronic Chart where it spent 15 days in a row, cracked the iTunes Electronic Chart Top 10 in 7 other countries outside the U.S., and reached #20 on the iTunes Overall Albums chart. Their breakout single, "Say My Name (feat. Zyra)," reached #1 on the Hype Machine popular chart twice, #1 on the Spotify US Viral Chart, #2 on the Spotify Global Chart and was named iTunes Single of the Week in many countries around the globe. The “Say My Name” video was named a Vimeo staff pick and saw airplay on MTV Hits, MTVU and Fuse. ODESZA has also been commissioned to make remixes for Charli XCX, Angus & Julia Stone and many more to come.

That’s a lot of people paying attention! In Return is everything fans might have hoped for and then some: An album that places ODESZA firmly in the vanguard of electronic music’s coming of age. 

“Despite the many voices featured on the album, the sound is unified under a groove, built on ODESZA’s multi-layered melodies, spaced-out beats and cinematic charm.” - TIME 

“Every track off of their latest album In Return hangs between blithe, ethereal spaces and thumping percussion, like fuzzy clouds punctuated by dope-ass thunder. The duo keep things unpredictable, never relying on same beat for too long, their music making you feel as if you’re being teleported into the future that's nostalgic for the past.” - Noisey

“Mixed in with their classic approach are a number of choice guest appearances and snazzy experiments that push the limits of their sound.” - Seattle Times 

“...a surging contra-EDM movement..the duo blend deep house, bass, garage, chill wave and glitch-hop into an occasionally nostalgic but always airy summer soundtrack.” - Herald Sun (Australia)

“There’s a certain finger-on-the-pulse feeling with ODESZA. Their grasp on the direction of electronic music sets them apart and they’re becoming the gold standard of acts born from sounds exchanged on the internet.” - Paste Magazine

“ODESZA has already demonstrated the ability to take root in the future and garage house genre as a power team to watch, and continues to showcase their forward thinking ear for the genre’s sound.” - Dancing Astronaut

[links] =>

inreturn.odesza.com

Facebook
Twitter
Soundcloud

[image_upload_id] => 19684 [label_id] => 5 [twitter_username] => odesza [instagram_id] => 272276842 [instagram_username] => odesza [link] => [listed] => 0 [sortname] => ODESZA [created] => 2014-07-14 21:14:03 [modified] => 2014-11-10 18:14:52 [slug] => odesza [fuga_id] => [description_clean] =>

In 2012, a striking new voice emerged from the wider surge of electronic music in the U.S. ODESZA’s Summer’s Gone stood out from the crowd; it was a collection of songs, not just beats; and its irresistible, startling dreaminess, addictive drums and fathoms-deep bass set it apart from the by-the-numbers brutality of EDM’s also-rans. In an age of manufactured internet buzz and carefully plotted hype, ODESZA’s story was refreshingly authentic: A brilliant new duo unveiled their music on the internet, and the world paid attention.

Harrison Mills (aka CatacombKid) and Clayton Knight (aka BeachesBeaches) began recording together after meeting at Western Washington University. There was instant chemistry, and the pair worked prolifically, quickly carving out a distinctive, heady sound: glitched-out vocals, soaring, visceral melody and ear-gripping drums.  Two songs from Summer’s Gone – “How Did I Get Here” and “iPlayYouListen” – instantly leapt to number 1 on the Hype Machine Popular Chart. ODESZA began to make evangelical fans, with word of their music setting the world – both real and virtual – alight.

2013 saw the release of the My Friends Never Die EP, with three of the five tracks hitting #1 on Hype Machine. Relentless touring followed, including dates with Pretty Lights and Emancipator and numerous festival performances including Sasquatch Music Festival and Lightning In A Bottle. Thrown in at the deep end, ODESZA quickly honed a live craft to match that of their recordings.

The duo was playing to larger and larger crowds when Pretty Lights asked them to be the support act on the fall Pretty Lights tour, and to remix "One Day They'll Know," which also hit #1 on Hype Machine and #8 on the iTunes Electronic Chart.  Later in 2013, ODESZA selected their favourite producers for a follow up remix EP, My Friends Never Die Remixes, and launched the ambitious, ongoing mixtape series NO.SLEEP. 

February 2014 brought the release of the ODESZA single “Sun Models (feat. Madelyn Grant,)” taken from the duo’s forthcoming second album. This song continued the trend they’d set previously, and it too hit #1 on Hype Machine.  In March 2014 ODESZA’s remix of Pretty Lights’ “Lost And Found” was released on the DIVERGENT movie soundtrack, and (you guessed it!) hit #1 on Hype Machine.  

Harrison and Clayton headed back into the studio, putting the finishes touches to their forthcoming second album, before setting out on a sold out North American tour in Spring, culminating in a performance at Coachella. Not wanting to leave their growing legion of fans wanting, the duo’s remix of ZHU’s hit “Faded” was released, taking their #1s on the Hype Machine chart straight into double figures.

Summer 2014 saw ODESZA visit Australia to play a series of live dates, before heading back to North America for festivals, and to polish up and master their now hotly anticipated sophomore album. 

And finally that brand new album is here. In Return has more than just delivered on the promise of ODESZA’s previous work. A record with a precocious maturity and coherence, it’s a start-to-finish stunner of pop-infused, electronic wonder, littered with infectious hooks and potent atmosphere. Vocal performances from Zyra, Py and Shy Girls accompany that of Madelyn Grant on Sun Models, expertly worked into ODESZA’s trademark, mood-altering uplift. 

ODESZA developed a new live performance to accompany In Return, ensuring that the shows do full justice to the album. Their work ethic and constant evolution resulted in a sold out headline tour of North America this fall and has set them up for a successful first European tour. 2015 brings an even more ambitious live production which ODESZA will unveil at every major music festival across the United States. 

One of the stunning aspects of ODESZA is the speed with which they’ve created a large, devoted fanbase – testament to just how refreshing, immediate and exciting their music is. To date, ODESZA has earned 16 Hype Machine #1s, amassed over 35 million SoundCloud streams and 15.3 million Spotify plays in the last 60 days, and been licensed by Adidas, GoPro, Piz Buin and many more. In Return debuted at #1 on the Billboard Electronic chart, #42 on the Billboard Top 200 chart, # 1 on the iTunes Electronic Chart where it spent 15 days in a row, cracked the iTunes Electronic Chart Top 10 in 7 other countries outside the U.S., and reached #20 on the iTunes Overall Albums chart. Their breakout single, "Say My Name (feat. Zyra)," reached #1 on the Hype Machine popular chart twice, #1 on the Spotify US Viral Chart, #2 on the Spotify Global Chart and was named iTunes Single of the Week in many countries around the globe. The “Say My Name” video was named a Vimeo staff pick and saw airplay on MTV Hits, MTVU and Fuse. ODESZA has also been commissioned to make remixes for Charli XCX, Angus & Julia Stone and many more to come.

That’s a lot of people paying attention! In Return is everything fans might have hoped for and then some: An album that places ODESZA firmly in the vanguard of electronic music’s coming of age. 

“Despite the many voices featured on the album, the sound is unified under a groove, built on ODESZA’s multi-layered melodies, spaced-out beats and cinematic charm.” - TIME 

“Every track off of their latest album In Return hangs between blithe, ethereal spaces and thumping percussion, like fuzzy clouds punctuated by dope-ass thunder. The duo keep things unpredictable, never relying on same beat for too long, their music making you feel as if you’re being teleported into the future that's nostalgic for the past.” - Noisey

“Mixed in with their classic approach are a number of choice guest appearances and snazzy experiments that push the limits of their sound.” - Seattle Times 

“...a surging contra-EDM movement..the duo blend deep house, bass, garage, chill wave and glitch-hop into an occasionally nostalgic but always airy summer soundtrack.” - Herald Sun (Australia)

“There’s a certain finger-on-the-pulse feeling with ODESZA. Their grasp on the direction of electronic music sets them apart and they’re becoming the gold standard of acts born from sounds exchanged on the internet.” - Paste Magazine

“ODESZA has already demonstrated the ability to take root in the future and garage house genre as a power team to watch, and continues to showcase their forward thinking ear for the genre’s sound.” - Dancing Astronaut

[links_clean] =>

inreturn.odesza.com

Facebook
Twitter
Soundcloud

[counter_player] => [counter_biog] =>

In 2012, a striking new voice emerged from the wider surge of electronic music in the U.S. ODESZA’s Summer’s Gone stood out from the crowd; it was a collection of songs, not just beats; and its irresistible, startling dreaminess, addictive drums and fathoms-deep bass set it apart from the by-the-numbers brutality of EDM’s also-rans. In an age of manufactured internet buzz and carefully plotted hype, ODESZA’s story was refreshingly authentic: A brilliant new duo unveiled their music on the internet, and the world paid attention.

Harrison Mills (aka CatacombKid) and Clayton Knight (aka BeachesBeaches) began recording together after meeting at Western Washington University. There was instant chemistry, and the pair worked prolifically, quickly carving out a distinctive, heady sound: glitched-out vocals, soaring, visceral melody and ear-gripping drums.  Two songs from Summer’s Gone – “How Did I Get Here” and “iPlayYouListen” – instantly leapt to number 1 on the Hype Machine Popular Chart. ODESZA began to make evangelical fans, with word of their music setting the world – both real and virtual – alight.

2013 saw the release of the My Friends Never Die EP, with three of the five tracks hitting #1 on Hype Machine. Relentless touring followed, including dates with Pretty Lights and Emancipator and numerous festival performances including Sasquatch Music Festival and Lightning In A Bottle. Thrown in at the deep end, ODESZA quickly honed a live craft to match that of their recordings.

The duo was playing to larger and larger crowds when Pretty Lights asked them to be the support act on the fall Pretty Lights tour, and to remix "One Day They'll Know," which also hit #1 on Hype Machine and #8 on the iTunes Electronic Chart.  Later in 2013, ODESZA selected their favourite producers for a follow up remix EP, My Friends Never Die Remixes, and launched the ambitious, ongoing mixtape series NO.SLEEP. 

February 2014 brought the release of the ODESZA single “Sun Models (feat. Madelyn Grant,)” taken from the duo’s forthcoming second album. This song continued the trend they’d set previously, and it too hit #1 on Hype Machine.  In March 2014 ODESZA’s remix of Pretty Lights’ “Lost And Found” was released on the DIVERGENT movie soundtrack, and (you guessed it!) hit #1 on Hype Machine.  

Harrison and Clayton headed back into the studio, putting the finishes touches to their forthcoming second album, before setting out on a sold out North American tour in Spring, culminating in a performance at Coachella. Not wanting to leave their growing legion of fans wanting, the duo’s remix of ZHU’s hit “Faded” was released, taking their #1s on the Hype Machine chart straight into double figures.

 

Summer 2014 saw ODESZA visit Australia to play a series of live dates, before heading back to North America for festivals, and to polish up and master their now hotly anticipated sophomore album. 

And finally that brand new album is here. In Return has more than just delivered on the promise of ODESZA’s previous work. A record with a precocious maturity and coherence, it’s a start-to-finish stunner of pop-infused, electronic wonder, littered with infectious hooks and potent atmosphere. Vocal performances from Zyra, Py and Shy Girls accompany that of Madelyn Grant on Sun Models, expertly worked into ODESZA’s trademark, mood-altering uplift. 

ODESZA developed a new live performance to accompany In Return, ensuring that the shows do full justice to the album. Their work ethic and constant evolution resulted in a sold out headline tour of North America this fall and has set them up for a successful first European tour. 2015 brings an even more ambitious live production which ODESZA will unveil at every major music festival across the United States. 

One of the stunning aspects of ODESZA is the speed with which they’ve created a large, devoted fanbase – testament to just how refreshing, immediate and exciting their music is. To date, ODESZA has earned 16 Hype Machine #1s, amassed over 35 million SoundCloud streams and 15.3 million Spotify plays in the last 60 days, and been licensed by Adidas, GoPro, Piz Buin and many more. In Return debuted at #1 on the Billboard Electronic chart, #42 on the Billboard Top 200 chart, # 1 on the iTunes Electronic Chart where it spent 15 days in a row, cracked the iTunes Electronic Chart Top 10 in 7 other countries outside the U.S., and reached #20 on the iTunes Overall Albums chart. Their breakout single, "Say My Name (feat. Zyra)," reached #1 on the Hype Machine popular chart twice, #1 on the Spotify US Viral Chart, #2 on the Spotify Global Chart and was named iTunes Single of the Week in many countries around the globe. The “Say My Name” video was named a Vimeo staff pick and saw airplay on MTV Hits, MTVU and Fuse. ODESZA has also been commissioned to make remixes for Charli XCX, Angus & Julia Stone and many more to come.

That’s a lot of people paying attention! In Return is everything fans might have hoped for and then some: An album that places ODESZA firmly in the vanguard of electronic music’s coming of age. 

“Despite the many voices featured on the album, the sound is unified under a groove, built on ODESZA’s multi-layered melodies, spaced-out beats and cinematic charm.” - TIME 

“Every track off of their latest album In Return hangs between blithe, ethereal spaces and thumping percussion, like fuzzy clouds punctuated by dope-ass thunder. The duo keep things unpredictable, never relying on same beat for too long, their music making you feel as if you’re being teleported into the future that's nostalgic for the past.” - Noisey

“Mixed in with their classic approach are a number of choice guest appearances and snazzy experiments that push the limits of their sound.” - Seattle Times 

“...a surging contra-EDM movement..the duo blend deep house, bass, garage, chill wave and glitch-hop into an occasionally nostalgic but always airy summer soundtrack.” - Herald Sun (Australia)

“There’s a certain finger-on-the-pulse feeling with ODESZA. Their grasp on the direction of electronic music sets them apart and they’re becoming the gold standard of acts born from sounds exchanged on the internet.” - Paste Magazine

“ODESZA has already demonstrated the ability to take root in the future and garage house genre as a power team to watch, and continues to showcase their forward thinking ear for the genre’s sound.” - Dancing Astronaut

[tracking] => [conversions] => [hide_preorder] => 0 [hide_tracks] => 0 [hide_buy] => 0 ) ) ) [12] => Array ( [Event] => Array ( [id] => 14047 [date] => 2015-05-23 [artist] => Portico [city] => The Hague [state] => [country] => NL [venue] => Paard Van Troje [promoter] => [description] => [ticket_url] => http://www.paard.nl/ [image_upload_id] => 20575 [created] => 2015-03-30 10:29:23 [modified] => 2015-03-30 10:29:23 [year_slug] => 2015 [month_slug] => may [day_slug] => 23 [slug] => portico-the-hague-paard-van-troje [description_clean] => [products_count] => 0 [hidden] => 0 [soldout] => 0 ) [Image] => Array ( [id] => 20575 [media_type] => image [artist] => Portico [title] => 2015 tour [credits] => [buy_link] => [filename] => images/portico/Portico-tour-poster-lores.jpg [checksum] => 9a55be3183aa87da892ebc8fc13ae693 [mime_type] => image/jpeg [size] => 114003 [external_url] => [image_upload_id] => [first_track_id] => [first_release_id] => [listed] => 0 [active] => 1 [processed] => 1 [artist_slug] => portico [slug] => 2015-tour [created] => 2015-02-06 10:28:14 [modified] => 2015-02-06 10:28:15 [embed] => ) [Country] => Array ( [id] => 234 [name] => Netherlands [longname] => Netherlands [numcode] => 528 [iso] => NL [iso3] => NLD [currency] => EUR [active] => 1 [parent_id] => 226 [lft] => 465 [rght] => 466 [level] => 2 ) [Product] => Array ( ) [Artist] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => 213 [name] => Portico [description] =>

If the name PORTICO seems familiar, that’s probably understandable, as is the fact that the faces behind it may seem recognisable too. As Portico Quartet, Jack Wyllie, Duncan Bellamy, Milo Fitzpatrick and then member Nick Mulvey released their first album together – the Mercury Music Prize nominated Knee-Deep In The North Sea – back in 2007, but things around a group change, especially when you start out so young, and by the time Mulvey’s successor, Keir Vine, had also moved on, the three London based musicians realised that they were no longer satisfied by the music they were making. They had, as they put it, “gone as far as they could”. It was early 2013 - they’d all grown up, and were no longer a quartet either. This time, they decided, it was their turn to make the changes.

LIVING FIELDS is the debut album by PORTICO, and if the people – and the name they employ – seem familiar, rest assured that the music they make is not. Gone are the hang drum, the saxophone and the drum kit with which they first caught the world’s attention. What emerges instead is – put simply – startling. The people are the same, but the band’s been transformed. PORTICO and LIVING FIELDS are the proof, and one listen makes it clear that this is almost entirely new territory for Fitzpatrick, Wyllie and Bellamy. Sparse, immersive and spectral, it’s an album that is at once substantial and yet insubstantial, capable of absorbing one into an intricate sonic world whose fundamental components seem paradoxically intangible.

The temptation might be to define LIVING FIELDS as an “electronic” album. As Bellamy points out, however, plenty of its components come from an analogue world. “I don't think we feel that it's overtly 'electronic',” he elaborates, “in the way that, say, Aphex Twin or Autechre are defined by the association. For starters, there's piano, guitar and bass on the record – though we usually try and treat them in an interesting way – as well as field recordings. For example, in ‘Void’ there’s a recording of a very large, old ship being torn apart, which ties into the concepts of decay and disintegration which run through the album. But a lot of the sounds are electronic and come from synthesisers, samplers or drum machines. Even most of the more acoustic sounds are mediated by effects or computers somehow.”

As it happens, the process of change began some time ago, and arguably, Mulvey’s departure from the ranks in 2011 was connected to this gradual metamorphosis. As Bellamy admits, “We were getting interested in electronics, and finding more ways we could expand the band’s sound, and as we were getting more enthusiastic, Nick was beginning to feel like his role was literally getting drowned out, and was becoming more interested in his own music”.

By late 2012, the band had reached a crossroads. The three of them, plus Vine, had experimented with new approaches, as well as vocalists, on that year’s eponymous album, but afterwards they found themselves in musical disarray. As Fitzpatrick recalls, “We just had this massive existential crisis, where we were like, I don’t think we want to do this any more, do we? No one seemed to be very enthusiastic about that current state of the band.” Wyllie underlines this: “It was a good time to take a step back, to really examine what we were collectively willing to do, and what we were interested in.”

In trying to rediscover what it was that had first brought them together, the musicians learned one crucial lesson: if they could identify their initial chemistry, then they could salvage the very essence of their creative energy. “That's the point we decided to draw a line under the old Portico Quartet,” Bellamy says, “and just do something that was really different and new, and a challenge for us again. It worked, because we suddenly felt way more invigorated and passionate about making music together again.”Portico Quartet’, they understood at last, was merely the name of a project on which they’d collaborated. ‘PORTICO’ would be another.

This realisation, and the freedom that it allowed them, enabled the trio to reinvent themselves. Conscious that they were simultaneously the same band, and yet a new one, they chose to drop the ‘Quartet’ from their name as a symbol of their new beginnings, but to keep ‘Portico’ as, in Fitzpatrick’s words, “an acknowledgement that we are the same three people, with a certain chemistry, looking for the same things.” What followed was, in a sense, a return to their roots: though tracks were still built up using loops and individual sections, they embarked on more structured material, just as they had on their debut. “One of the things we were interested in, especially in the early stuff, was song writing,” Wyllie explains, “but by the third album we’d started to explore textures.” As a rejuvenated unit, PORTICO now incorporate both these elements into their music, with the likes of the title track, "101", "Colour Fading" and "Bright Luck" all strikingly melodic but elaborately arranged. “In the past,” Bellamy points out, “we had always written all together, playing through the compositions and arrangements with all our instruments. Once we were finished we would go to a studio to record it all live, and then do overdubs. This time we just invested in some gear for our studio and started recording directly onto the computer. If someone had an idea, we would put it down straight away, and that could be the finished track. It was quite liberating because suddenly we had way more control of the recording process.”

What subsequently materialised is, as they themselves describe it, “music which moves forward towards distant places while offering rare intimacy, arriving somewhere between structured pop songs and a disintegrating ambience, a unique blend of the sublunary and the celestial.” They were inspired by leftfield artists like William Basinski and Tim Hecker – with whose music theirs shares what Wyllie describes as “this feeling of something breaking up and falling apart” – and a crucial moment in their development came when they were asked by the Royal Academy of Art to write music for an exhibition about space and architecture in early 2014. “That opened up a new sound world,” Fitzpatrick says. “ ‘Void’ is actually from that session, and ‘Dissolution’ too.”

Aware that they were ready to work with vocalists, they sought suitable candidates, and eventually alighted on three singers with whom they already had a connection, and whose distinctive voices matched what they had in mind. The first part of the puzzle was Alt-J’s Joe Newman: he’d grown up two doors down from Wyllie in Southampton, where Fitzpatrick was also raised, and they’d always been mutual fans of each other’s music. His initial contribution, "101", was the proof PORTICO needed that their musical gamble had paid off, and he soon delivered further tracks, "Brittle" and "Atacama". “He’s obviously a really talented songwriter,” Wyllie states. “He just kept coming out with these great melodies, really quickly too. It helps collaborating with people if you’ve got a personal connection.” It was the personal connection that seemed vital: Old friend, and former Portico house mate, Jamie Woon, also came on board for the epic "Memory Of Newness": They’d always wanted to work together in the past, but only now did the material suit the concept. Woon, in turn, had introduced the band to Jono McCleery, One of the band’s favourite singers, he had opened for Portico Quartet at the ICA a few years earlier and, as with Jamie and Joe, the collaboration flowed naturally. The songs on which they would go on to collaborate were so successful that McCleery was invited to join the band to help play the new material live, and the album takes its title from one of their collaborations, the darkly hypnotic Living Fields.

From the outset, PORTICO insisted that LIVING FIELDS maintain an overarching concept, rather than being, as Wyllie puts it, “a collection of songs with totally disparate, unrelated lyrics”. Each of the band’s members had been forced to confront various diverse private issues in the preceding period of time, and they wanted the record to remain personal to them, despite these outside collaborators. Their search for a method of articulating the relevant themes included work by Herman Hesse and Philip Larkin, but eventually they found the touchstone they were searching for in the shape of an award-winning Chilean documentary, Nostalgia For The Light.

The film crystallised many of the topics that they’d been addressing amongst themselves – the search for identity, the significance of memory, questions about life and death, the way that each answer we uncover can provoke further mysteries – and they asked McCleery, Woon and Newman to view it before they wrote their lyrics. “It wasn’t like we watched it and said, Let’s make an album about that,” Wyllie clarifies. “It was, Let’s find something that we can use to inspire some singers that connects to what we’re thinking.” It was the final detail in the making of an extraordinary, enigmatic but unified record, and, just as some of the sounds seem to veer in and out of focus, so words and phrases drift through a haze of reverb-drenched pianos, synth arpeggios, subterranean bass and ambient noise, all punctured by illuminated shards of programmed and live drums.

The results are unlike anything else that’s come before and, for all the band know, may even be unlike anything they do in the future. As Fitzpatrick concludes, “This is just one album. Who knows what the next one’s going to be like? We’re taking it one step at a time. What we’ve learned is that it’s really all about us three.”

Welcome, then, PORTICO and their LIVING FIELDS: a bold, adventurous step into the unknown that bravely inspires as many questions as answers. As Hermann Hesse wrote in Stages, a poem from The Glass Bead Game that became one of the band’s maxims:

“Serenely they let us move to distant places, And let no sentiment of home detain us. The Cosmic Spirit seeks not to restrain us But lifts us stage by stage to wider spaces.”

[links] =>

porticomusic.co.uk
Facebook
Twitter
Instagram
SoundCloud

[image_upload_id] => 20561 [label_id] => 1 [twitter_username] => porticomusic [instagram_id] => 1308320561 [instagram_username] => porticomusic [link] => [listed] => 1 [sortname] => Portico [created] => 2014-09-23 15:38:15 [modified] => 2015-03-26 17:30:47 [slug] => portico [fuga_id] => [description_clean] =>

If the name PORTICO seems familiar, that’s probably understandable, as is the fact that the faces behind it may seem recognisable too. As Portico Quartet, Jack Wyllie, Duncan Bellamy, Milo Fitzpatrick and then member Nick Mulvey released their first album together – the Mercury Music Prize nominated Knee-Deep In The North Sea – back in 2007, but things around a group change, especially when you start out so young, and by the time Mulvey’s successor, Keir Vine, had also moved on, the three London based musicians realised that they were no longer satisfied by the music they were making. They had, as they put it, “gone as far as they could”. It was early 2013 - they’d all grown up, and were no longer a quartet either. This time, they decided, it was their turn to make the changes.

LIVING FIELDS is the debut album by PORTICO, and if the people – and the name they employ – seem familiar, rest assured that the music they make is not. Gone are the hang drum, the saxophone and the drum kit with which they first caught the world’s attention. What emerges instead is – put simply – startling. The people are the same, but the band’s been transformed. PORTICO and LIVING FIELDS are the proof, and one listen makes it clear that this is almost entirely new territory for Fitzpatrick, Wyllie and Bellamy. Sparse, immersive and spectral, it’s an album that is at once substantial and yet insubstantial, capable of absorbing one into an intricate sonic world whose fundamental components seem paradoxically intangible.

The temptation might be to define LIVING FIELDS as an “electronic” album. As Bellamy points out, however, plenty of its components come from an analogue world. “I don't think we feel that it's overtly 'electronic',” he elaborates, “in the way that, say, Aphex Twin or Autechre are defined by the association. For starters, there's piano, guitar and bass on the record – though we usually try and treat them in an interesting way – as well as field recordings. For example, in ‘Void’ there’s a recording of a very large, old ship being torn apart, which ties into the concepts of decay and disintegration which run through the album. But a lot of the sounds are electronic and come from synthesisers, samplers or drum machines. Even most of the more acoustic sounds are mediated by effects or computers somehow.”

As it happens, the process of change began some time ago, and arguably, Mulvey’s departure from the ranks in 2011 was connected to this gradual metamorphosis. As Bellamy admits, “We were getting interested in electronics, and finding more ways we could expand the band’s sound, and as we were getting more enthusiastic, Nick was beginning to feel like his role was literally getting drowned out, and was becoming more interested in his own music”.

By late 2012, the band had reached a crossroads. The three of them, plus Vine, had experimented with new approaches, as well as vocalists, on that year’s eponymous album, but afterwards they found themselves in musical disarray. As Fitzpatrick recalls, “We just had this massive existential crisis, where we were like, I don’t think we want to do this any more, do we? No one seemed to be very enthusiastic about that current state of the band.” Wyllie underlines this: “It was a good time to take a step back, to really examine what we were collectively willing to do, and what we were interested in.”

In trying to rediscover what it was that had first brought them together, the musicians learned one crucial lesson: if they could identify their initial chemistry, then they could salvage the very essence of their creative energy. “That's the point we decided to draw a line under the old Portico Quartet,” Bellamy says, “and just do something that was really different and new, and a challenge for us again. It worked, because we suddenly felt way more invigorated and passionate about making music together again.”Portico Quartet’, they understood at last, was merely the name of a project on which they’d collaborated. ‘PORTICO’ would be another.

This realisation, and the freedom that it allowed them, enabled the trio to reinvent themselves. Conscious that they were simultaneously the same band, and yet a new one, they chose to drop the ‘Quartet’ from their name as a symbol of their new beginnings, but to keep ‘Portico’ as, in Fitzpatrick’s words, “an acknowledgement that we are the same three people, with a certain chemistry, looking for the same things.” What followed was, in a sense, a return to their roots: though tracks were still built up using loops and individual sections, they embarked on more structured material, just as they had on their debut. “One of the things we were interested in, especially in the early stuff, was song writing,” Wyllie explains, “but by the third album we’d started to explore textures.” As a rejuvenated unit, PORTICO now incorporate both these elements into their music, with the likes of the title track, "101", "Colour Fading" and "Bright Luck" all strikingly melodic but elaborately arranged. “In the past,” Bellamy points out, “we had always written all together, playing through the compositions and arrangements with all our instruments. Once we were finished we would go to a studio to record it all live, and then do overdubs. This time we just invested in some gear for our studio and started recording directly onto the computer. If someone had an idea, we would put it down straight away, and that could be the finished track. It was quite liberating because suddenly we had way more control of the recording process.”

What subsequently materialised is, as they themselves describe it, “music which moves forward towards distant places while offering rare intimacy, arriving somewhere between structured pop songs and a disintegrating ambience, a unique blend of the sublunary and the celestial.” They were inspired by leftfield artists like William Basinski and Tim Hecker – with whose music theirs shares what Wyllie describes as “this feeling of something breaking up and falling apart” – and a crucial moment in their development came when they were asked by the Royal Academy of Art to write music for an exhibition about space and architecture in early 2014. “That opened up a new sound world,” Fitzpatrick says. “ ‘Void’ is actually from that session, and ‘Dissolution’ too.”

Aware that they were ready to work with vocalists, they sought suitable candidates, and eventually alighted on three singers with whom they already had a connection, and whose distinctive voices matched what they had in mind. The first part of the puzzle was Alt-J’s Joe Newman: he’d grown up two doors down from Wyllie in Southampton, where Fitzpatrick was also raised, and they’d always been mutual fans of each other’s music. His initial contribution, "101", was the proof PORTICO needed that their musical gamble had paid off, and he soon delivered further tracks, "Brittle" and "Atacama". “He’s obviously a really talented songwriter,” Wyllie states. “He just kept coming out with these great melodies, really quickly too. It helps collaborating with people if you’ve got a personal connection.” It was the personal connection that seemed vital: Old friend, and former Portico house mate, Jamie Woon, also came on board for the epic "Memory Of Newness": They’d always wanted to work together in the past, but only now did the material suit the concept. Woon, in turn, had introduced the band to Jono McCleery, One of the band’s favourite singers, he had opened for Portico Quartet at the ICA a few years earlier and, as with Jamie and Joe, the collaboration flowed naturally. The songs on which they would go on to collaborate were so successful that McCleery was invited to join the band to help play the new material live, and the album takes its title from one of their collaborations, the darkly hypnotic Living Fields.

From the outset, PORTICO insisted that LIVING FIELDS maintain an overarching concept, rather than being, as Wyllie puts it, “a collection of songs with totally disparate, unrelated lyrics”. Each of the band’s members had been forced to confront various diverse private issues in the preceding period of time, and they wanted the record to remain personal to them, despite these outside collaborators. Their search for a method of articulating the relevant themes included work by Herman Hesse and Philip Larkin, but eventually they found the touchstone they were searching for in the shape of an award-winning Chilean documentary, Nostalgia For The Light.

The film crystallised many of the topics that they’d been addressing amongst themselves – the search for identity, the significance of memory, questions about life and death, the way that each answer we uncover can provoke further mysteries – and they asked McCleery, Woon and Newman to view it before they wrote their lyrics. “It wasn’t like we watched it and said, Let’s make an album about that,” Wyllie clarifies. “It was, Let’s find something that we can use to inspire some singers that connects to what we’re thinking.” It was the final detail in the making of an extraordinary, enigmatic but unified record, and, just as some of the sounds seem to veer in and out of focus, so words and phrases drift through a haze of reverb-drenched pianos, synth arpeggios, subterranean bass and ambient noise, all punctured by illuminated shards of programmed and live drums.

The results are unlike anything else that’s come before and, for all the band know, may even be unlike anything they do in the future. As Fitzpatrick concludes, “This is just one album. Who knows what the next one’s going to be like? We’re taking it one step at a time. What we’ve learned is that it’s really all about us three.”

Welcome, then, PORTICO and their LIVING FIELDS: a bold, adventurous step into the unknown that bravely inspires as many questions as answers. As Hermann Hesse wrote in Stages, a poem from The Glass Bead Game that became one of the band’s maxims:

“Serenely they let us move to distant places, And let no sentiment of home detain us. The Cosmic Spirit seeks not to restrain us But lifts us stage by stage to wider spaces.”

[links_clean] =>

porticomusic.co.uk
Facebook
Twitter
Instagram
SoundCloud

[counter_player] => [counter_biog] => [tracking] => [conversions] => [hide_preorder] => 0 [hide_tracks] => 0 [hide_buy] => 0 ) ) ) [13] => Array ( [Event] => Array ( [id] => 14057 [date] => 2015-05-23 [artist] => Fink [city] => Dortmund [state] => [country] => DE [venue] => Way Back When [promoter] => [description] => [ticket_url] => http://waybackwhen.wlec.ag/index.php?view=bestplatz&id=8 [image_upload_id] => 19785 [created] => 2015-03-30 18:12:35 [modified] => 2015-03-30 18:12:35 [year_slug] => 2015 [month_slug] => may [day_slug] => 23 [slug] => fink-dortmund-way-back-when [description_clean] => [products_count] => 0 [hidden] => 0 [soldout] => 0 ) [Image] => Array ( [id] => 19785 [media_type] => image [artist] => Fink [title] => Fink Artist Shot 2014 [credits] => [buy_link] => [filename] => images/fink/Fink-TommyNLance-2014-2-1.jpg [checksum] => f33ac1c81dca48ea7011bb0061a2d804 [mime_type] => image/jpeg [size] => 221775 [external_url] => http://media.ninjatune.net/images/fink/Fink-TommyNLance-2014-2-1.jpg [image_upload_id] => [first_track_id] => [first_release_id] => [listed] => 0 [active] => 1 [processed] => 1 [artist_slug] => fink [slug] => fink-artist-shot-2014 [created] => 2014-08-11 14:07:33 [modified] => 2014-08-11 14:10:27 [embed] => ) [Country] => Array ( [id] => 230 [name] => Germany [longname] => Germany [numcode] => 276 [iso] => DE [iso3] => DEU [currency] => EUR [active] => 1 [parent_id] => 226 [lft] => 457 [rght] => 458 [level] => 2 ) [Product] => Array ( ) [Artist] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => 4 [name] => Fink [description] =>

Hard Believer is the new studio album by FINK: Fin Greenall on vocals/guitar, alongside bandmates Tim Thornton on drums/guitar, and Guy Whittaker on bass. It will be their first release on the R’COUP’D imprint, a label newly created by Greenall with the backing of the Ninja Tune team. Urban, bluesy, and alive, Hard Believer is inspired by life’s twists and turns, channelling hard-won triumphs and bittersweet experiences. It is a masterful collection of songs from an artist at the peak of his creative powers.

“We wanted to go deeper this time, and be more ambitious with the music,” Fin explains, “to move the sound forward without losing touch of where we’re from.” Recorded in seventeen days at Hollywood’s legendary Sound Factory studiosHard Believer is shot through with rawness and controlled aggression; an album replete with calm beginnings seguing into powerfully hypnotic loops and climactic finales.“It’s performance-oriented rather than track-oriented,” Fin says. “We recorded a lot of the vocals at the same time as the acoustic guitars so they aren’t always perfectly synchronised. But we like that honesty in our recordings.”

With Thornton and Whittaker now as trusted co-writers, work on the new songs began after the Perfect Darkness/Wheels tour finished in India in late 2012, continuing on subsequent trips to LA (where Greenall also wrote tracks for the William H Macy movie Rudderless, and with John Legend for the 12 Years a Slave soundtrack album). After a year of intensive writing sessions in Amsterdam, Brighton and London, the band journeyed to California to reunite with producer Billy Bush (Garbage, Beck, Foster the People). Other contributors to the album include Dutch jazz pianist Ruben Hein, with strings courtesy of Matt Kelly and Andrew Phillips.

The new album presents ten brand new songs, including the mighty “Shakespeare”, a tale of young love gone tragically sour as the mood darkens from acoustic to guttural rock; the spiky yet delicate “Looking Too Closely”, riding an irresistible piano-and-guitar groove; “Green And The Blue”, on which a vulnerable Greenall meditates on the constants in life that see you through tough times; “Two Days Later”, a deeply personal lament and one of only two songs that start and remain down-tempo; and the breathtaking “Pilgrim”, the latest collaboration with songwriter Blair Mackichan, co-writer of “This Is The Thing” from Fink’s 2007 Distance and Time, and “Honesty” from 2011’s Perfect Darkness.

Hard Believer continues the bold expansion of folk’s parameters begun by its predecessor, Perfect Darkness: “A delight… you don’t want it to end,” glowed a Guardian review, and at times on the epic 18-month tour that followed, it felt as if it never would. Such was the global popularity of the album that it also spawned not one, but two live records: 2012’s Wheels Turn Beneath My Feet, and 2013’s Fink Meets the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, which repurposed the songs as rolling mini-symphonies with one of the greatest symphony orchestras in the world. The campaign concluded with the release of final single “Warm Shadow,” accompanied by a cover of the song from Justin Vernon and Colin Stetson of Bon Iver.

Greenall has always been a guitarist; self-taught at a young age, it was a quiet and personal gift he kept largely to himself. He began creating trip-hop music in college, leading to his first purely electronic album Fresh Produce, released on Ninja Tune’s N-Tone label in 2000. It was six “long-assed” and “brutal” years of DJing before his next record, 2006’s Biscuits for Breakfast, unveiled the radical new singer-songwriter direction. Greenall had initially envisaged only a partial transition from the world of electronica, but it was Ninja Tune who insisted he either commit fully to the shift from behind the decks, or not at all. “Their encouragement helped me make one of the most important decisions of my career,” he admits.

Another big influence on the transition was producing and co-writing tracks for others from his basement studio; among them the actor Michael Pitt, and a teenage Amy Winehouse. “She blew my mind,” Greenall says. “At the time, if you didn’t look like one of Girls Aloud it was game over. Amy reminded us that it’s what you sound like and have to say, that counts.” One of their collaborations, “Half Time”, produced by Salaam Remi, can be heard on her posthumous collection Lioness: Hidden Treasures.

Much like Fink albums of the past, Hard Believer covers wide ground. Musically it explores folk, electronica, blues, and rock. But it’s the songwriting that really propels Fink into a new space: a serious evolution that should see him regarded as one of the UK’s great modern-day songwriters. “The term ‘Hard Believer’ comes from deep-south Americana; it means somebody who is difficult to persuade, who requires proof.” In truth, all anyone has to do here is listen to the powerful collection of songs on Hard Believer. The belief will surely follow.

[links] =>

Fink Website

Facebook
Twitter
Soundcloud

[image_upload_id] => 19785 [label_id] => 13 [twitter_username] => Finkmusic [instagram_id] => [instagram_username] => [link] => [listed] => 1 [sortname] => Fink [created] => 2010-07-17 22:15:58 [modified] => 2015-03-16 17:46:48 [slug] => fink [fuga_id] => [description_clean] =>

Hard Believer is the new studio album by FINK: Fin Greenall on vocals/guitar, alongside bandmates Tim Thornton on drums/guitar, and Guy Whittaker on bass. It will be their first release on the R’COUP’D imprint, a label newly created by Greenall with the backing of the Ninja Tune team. Urban, bluesy, and alive, Hard Believer is inspired by life’s twists and turns, channelling hard-won triumphs and bittersweet experiences. It is a masterful collection of songs from an artist at the peak of his creative powers.

“We wanted to go deeper this time, and be more ambitious with the music,” Fin explains, “to move the sound forward without losing touch of where we’re from.” Recorded in seventeen days at Hollywood’s legendary Sound Factory studiosHard Believer is shot through with rawness and controlled aggression; an album replete with calm beginnings seguing into powerfully hypnotic loops and climactic finales.“It’s performance-oriented rather than track-oriented,” Fin says. “We recorded a lot of the vocals at the same time as the acoustic guitars so they aren’t always perfectly synchronised. But we like that honesty in our recordings.”

With Thornton and Whittaker now as trusted co-writers, work on the new songs began after the Perfect Darkness/Wheels tour finished in India in late 2012, continuing on subsequent trips to LA (where Greenall also wrote tracks for the William H Macy movie Rudderless, and with John Legend for the 12 Years a Slave soundtrack album). After a year of intensive writing sessions in Amsterdam, Brighton and London, the band journeyed to California to reunite with producer Billy Bush (Garbage, Beck, Foster the People). Other contributors to the album include Dutch jazz pianist Ruben Hein, with strings courtesy of Matt Kelly and Andrew Phillips.

The new album presents ten brand new songs, including the mighty “Shakespeare”, a tale of young love gone tragically sour as the mood darkens from acoustic to guttural rock; the spiky yet delicate “Looking Too Closely”, riding an irresistible piano-and-guitar groove; “Green And The Blue”, on which a vulnerable Greenall meditates on the constants in life that see you through tough times; “Two Days Later”, a deeply personal lament and one of only two songs that start and remain down-tempo; and the breathtaking “Pilgrim”, the latest collaboration with songwriter Blair Mackichan, co-writer of “This Is The Thing” from Fink’s 2007 Distance and Time, and “Honesty” from 2011’s Perfect Darkness.

Hard Believer continues the bold expansion of folk’s parameters begun by its predecessor, Perfect Darkness: “A delight… you don’t want it to end,” glowed a Guardian review, and at times on the epic 18-month tour that followed, it felt as if it never would. Such was the global popularity of the album that it also spawned not one, but two live records: 2012’s Wheels Turn Beneath My Feet, and 2013’s Fink Meets the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, which repurposed the songs as rolling mini-symphonies with one of the greatest symphony orchestras in the world. The campaign concluded with the release of final single “Warm Shadow,” accompanied by a cover of the song from Justin Vernon and Colin Stetson of Bon Iver.

Greenall has always been a guitarist; self-taught at a young age, it was a quiet and personal gift he kept largely to himself. He began creating trip-hop music in college, leading to his first purely electronic album Fresh Produce, released on Ninja Tune’s N-Tone label in 2000. It was six “long-assed” and “brutal” years of DJing before his next record, 2006’s Biscuits for Breakfast, unveiled the radical new singer-songwriter direction. Greenall had initially envisaged only a partial transition from the world of electronica, but it was Ninja Tune who insisted he either commit fully to the shift from behind the decks, or not at all. “Their encouragement helped me make one of the most important decisions of my career,” he admits.

Another big influence on the transition was producing and co-writing tracks for others from his basement studio; among them the actor Michael Pitt, and a teenage Amy Winehouse. “She blew my mind,” Greenall says. “At the time, if you didn’t look like one of Girls Aloud it was game over. Amy reminded us that it’s what you sound like and have to say, that counts.” One of their collaborations, “Half Time”, produced by Salaam Remi, can be heard on her posthumous collection Lioness: Hidden Treasures.

Much like Fink albums of the past, Hard Believer covers wide ground. Musically it explores folk, electronica, blues, and rock. But it’s the songwriting that really propels Fink into a new space: a serious evolution that should see him regarded as one of the UK’s great modern-day songwriters. “The term ‘Hard Believer’ comes from deep-south Americana; it means somebody who is difficult to persuade, who requires proof.” In truth, all anyone has to do here is listen to the powerful collection of songs on Hard Believer. The belief will surely follow.

[links_clean] =>

Fink Website

Facebook
Twitter
Soundcloud

[counter_player] => [counter_biog] => [tracking] => [conversions] => [hide_preorder] => 0 [hide_tracks] => 0 [hide_buy] => 0 ) ) ) [14] => Array ( [Event] => Array ( [id] => 14093 [date] => 2015-05-23 [artist] => Maribou State (DJ) [city] => Lincoln [state] => [country] => GB [venue] => Lost Village Festival [promoter] => [description] => [ticket_url] => http://www.ticketline.co.uk/lost-village#tour [image_upload_id] => 20609 [created] => 2015-04-16 15:18:25 [modified] => 2015-04-16 15:18:54 [year_slug] => 2015 [month_slug] => may [day_slug] => 23 [slug] => maribou-state-dj-lincoln-lost-village-festival [description_clean] => [products_count] => 0 [hidden] => 0 [soldout] => 0 ) [Image] => Array ( [id] => 20609 [media_type] => image [artist] => Maribou State [title] => Maribou State Press Pic 2015 [credits] => [buy_link] => [filename] => images/maribou-state/Maribou-State-CREDIT-2a-William-Cooper-Mitchell.jpg [checksum] => c08043c6a290b0885b7e2659e2065972 [mime_type] => image/jpeg [size] => 147857 [external_url] => [image_upload_id] => [first_track_id] => [first_release_id] => [listed] => 0 [active] => 0 [processed] => 1 [artist_slug] => maribou-state [slug] => maribou-state-press-pic-2015 [created] => 2015-02-10 14:58:29 [modified] => 2015-02-10 14:58:30 [embed] => ) [Country] => Array ( [id] => 208 [name] => United Kingdom [longname] => United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland [numcode] => 826 [iso] => GB [iso3] => GBR [currency] => GBP [active] => 1 [parent_id] => 191 [lft] => 413 [rght] => 414 [level] => 2 ) [Product] => Array ( ) [Artist] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => 225 [name] => Maribou State [description] =>

Despite growing up in the same picturesque village – Potten End (Herts) – Chris Davids and Liam Ivory aka Maribou State customarily ignored each other at school, but discovered their shared passion for music at university in Leeds and became firm friends.

Since then they have steadily built a glowing international reputation via a string of well-loved EPs and a fistful of remixes (including Kelis, Lana del Ray, Crookers, Kastle, Ultraísta) since 2011. Plaudits from the electronic press have flowed thick and fast alongside support from radio heavyweights: Zane Lowe, Huw Stephens, Annie Mac, B. Traits, Pete Tong and Gilles Peterson amongst others.

The past 18 months has been a glorious blur, with weekends dedicated to touring – the duo have zipped around UK, Europe, the US and Australia – whilst keeping a strict 9-to-5 work ethic in the studio during the week that has enabled them to record their finest work to date. It’s hard to pick out highlights, but Glastonbury, Warehouse Project and Bestival were particularly special milestones.

Intrigued by the dynamics of electronic music for the dancefloor as much as with the richness and human quality of live instrumentation and songcraft, they have worked tirelessly to evolve and forge a unique, compelling and deeply soulful marriage of the organic and the synthetic, showcased on their forthcoming debut album Portraits.

[links] => [image_upload_id] => 20609 [label_id] => 5 [twitter_username] => mariboustate [instagram_id] => [instagram_username] => mariboustate [link] => [listed] => 0 [sortname] => Maribou State [created] => 2015-02-10 14:57:59 [modified] => 2015-03-30 17:00:49 [slug] => maribou-state [fuga_id] => [description_clean] =>

Despite growing up in the same picturesque village – Potten End (Herts) – Chris Davids and Liam Ivory aka Maribou State customarily ignored each other at school, but discovered their shared passion for music at university in Leeds and became firm friends.

Since then they have steadily built a glowing international reputation via a string of well-loved EPs and a fistful of remixes (including Kelis, Lana del Ray, Crookers, Kastle, Ultraísta) since 2011. Plaudits from the electronic press have flowed thick and fast alongside support from radio heavyweights: Zane Lowe, Huw Stephens, Annie Mac, B. Traits, Pete Tong and Gilles Peterson amongst others.

The past 18 months has been a glorious blur, with weekends dedicated to touring – the duo have zipped around UK, Europe, the US and Australia – whilst keeping a strict 9-to-5 work ethic in the studio during the week that has enabled them to record their finest work to date. It’s hard to pick out highlights, but Glastonbury, Warehouse Project and Bestival were particularly special milestones.

Intrigued by the dynamics of electronic music for the dancefloor as much as with the richness and human quality of live instrumentation and songcraft, they have worked tirelessly to evolve and forge a unique, compelling and deeply soulful marriage of the organic and the synthetic, showcased on their forthcoming debut album Portraits.

[links_clean] => [counter_player] => [counter_biog] =>

Despite growing up in the same picturesque village – Potten End (Herts) – Chris Davids and Liam Ivory aka Maribou State customarily ignored each other at school, but discovered their shared passion for music at university in Leeds and became firm friends.

Since then they have steadily built a glowing international reputation via a string of well-loved EPs and a fistful of remixes (including Kelis, Lana del Ray, Crookers, Kastle, Ultraísta) since 2011. Plaudits from the electronic press have flowed thick and fast alongside support from radio heavyweights: Zane Lowe, Huw Stephens, Annie Mac, B. Traits, Pete Tong and Gilles Peterson amongst others.

The past 18 months has been a glorious blur, with weekends dedicated to touring – the duo have zipped around UK, Europe, the US and Australia – whilst keeping a strict 9-to-5 work ethic in the studio during the week that has enabled them to record their finest work to date. It’s hard to pick out highlights, but Glastonbury, Warehouse Project and Bestival were particularly special milestones.

Intrigued by the dynamics of electronic music for the dancefloor as much as with the richness and human quality of live instrumentation and songcraft, they have worked tirelessly to evolve and forge a unique, compelling and deeply soulful marriage of the organic and the synthetic, showcased on their forthcoming debut album Portraits.

[tracking] => [conversions] => [hide_preorder] => 0 [hide_tracks] => 0 [hide_buy] => 0 ) ) ) [15] => Array ( [Event] => Array ( [id] => 13904 [date] => 2015-05-24 [artist] => Howling [city] => Glasgow [state] => [country] => GB [venue] => Sub Club [promoter] => [description] => [ticket_url] => https://subclub.eventcube.io/events/2050/howling-live-support-telford-dj-set [image_upload_id] => 20558 [created] => 2015-02-10 10:38:43 [modified] => 2015-03-18 17:47:46 [year_slug] => 2015 [month_slug] => may [day_slug] => 24 [slug] => howling-glasgow-sub-club [description_clean] => [products_count] => 0 [hidden] => 0 [soldout] => 0 ) [Image] => Array ( [id] => 20558 [media_type] => image [artist] => HOWLING [title] => HOWLING Press Photo 2015 [credits] => [buy_link] => [filename] => images/howling/HOWLING-PRESSPIC-1-byMichaelMann.jpg [checksum] => 2ccf32397613b4214c4c3693bd4d7b80 [mime_type] => image/jpeg [size] => 7467559 [external_url] => [image_upload_id] => [first_track_id] => [first_release_id] => [listed] => 0 [active] => 0 [processed] => 1 [artist_slug] => howling [slug] => howling-press-photo-2015 [created] => 2015-02-04 07:53:02 [modified] => 2015-02-04 07:53:11 [embed] => ) [Country] => Array ( [id] => 208 [name] => United Kingdom [longname] => United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland [numcode] => 826 [iso] => GB [iso3] => GBR [currency] => GBP [active] => 1 [parent_id] => 191 [lft] => 413 [rght] => 414 [level] => 2 ) [Product] => Array ( ) [Artist] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => 223 [name] => Howling [description] =>

Howling’s album Sacred Ground stands for many things at once: collaboration, improvisation, simplicity, unexpected happenstance. The original track ‘Howling’ exploded virally in early 2012 (via Dixon’s Boiler Room set), though hardly past demo stage at the time, and proceeded to climb charts and win awards throughout electronic music. The track’s two humble collaborators - singer/producer/folk-electronic artist Ry X and me producer/Innervisions leader Frank Wiedemann - never saw it coming.

Nor did they expect that a few years later, despite being from two different sonic universes and living on two different sides of the world, their debut album would be pressed in Berlin. Sacred Ground will be released in May 2015 as a collaboration between Modeselektor’s archetypal Berlin label Monkeytown and Counter, an imprint of Ninja Tune.

Raised in a remote town in Australia, and now based in LA, Ry Cuming met Karlsruhe-born, Berlin-based Frank Wiedemann on Skype through a mutual friend. Ry had risen to underground-folk fame with his breakthrough hit ‘Berlin’ and band The Acid, while Wiedemann had long sat as royalty in the 4/4 scene.

After their ‘Howling’ track took off unintentionally, the pair met in Berlin for two shows, and two songs were made very quickly and intuitively in their two days of rehearsal. Session/rehearsal recordings flowed naturally from there, with songs sprouting up in very different atmospheres: a ceremony space in Topenga, CA surrounded by deep forest (hence their lush track ‘Forest’); amongst the WMC madness in Miami; in rehearsals in Zurich (indeed, where their ‘Zurich’ track was magically captured); even on Frank’s farm in South Germany at Lake Constance.

First single ‘Signs' is a shining representative of Howling’s album, ‘Sacred Ground’. A wondrous synergy of both artists, with tangible elements of Frank’s characteristic sound (deep, layered, amalgamative) creeping in ever so slightly amongst the profound freeness of Ry’s vocals and production. But the project takes both artists to someplace new altogether: beautiful, hypnotic soundscapes that somehow hold a sense of abandon and a sense of being found.

“Our process was very, very organic. For both of us, it’s just about the creation. Each song has a little journey of its own. The vision’s beautiful between us because there’s a lot of trust. It’s a very intuitive process where we fall in love with one element of the song or one element of a thought, and we follow that until both of those ideas have been met.” – Ry X

Howling In 2015, the collective Children of the Light from Holland will be building a live tour with Howling, creating a bespoke, interactive light setup.

[links] => [image_upload_id] => 20558 [label_id] => 5 [twitter_username] => HowlingHowling [instagram_id] => [instagram_username] => HowlingMusic [link] => [listed] => 0 [sortname] => Howling [created] => 2015-02-10 10:11:49 [modified] => 2015-03-09 10:37:06 [slug] => howling [fuga_id] => [description_clean] =>

Howling’s album Sacred Ground stands for many things at once: collaboration, improvisation, simplicity, unexpected happenstance. The original track ‘Howling’ exploded virally in early 2012 (via Dixon’s Boiler Room set), though hardly past demo stage at the time, and proceeded to climb charts and win awards throughout electronic music. The track’s two humble collaborators - singer/producer/folk-electronic artist Ry X and me producer/Innervisions leader Frank Wiedemann - never saw it coming.

Nor did they expect that a few years later, despite being from two different sonic universes and living on two different sides of the world, their debut album would be pressed in Berlin. Sacred Ground will be released in May 2015 as a collaboration between Modeselektor’s archetypal Berlin label Monkeytown and Counter, an imprint of Ninja Tune.

Raised in a remote town in Australia, and now based in LA, Ry Cuming met Karlsruhe-born, Berlin-based Frank Wiedemann on Skype through a mutual friend. Ry had risen to underground-folk fame with his breakthrough hit ‘Berlin’ and band The Acid, while Wiedemann had long sat as royalty in the 4/4 scene.

After their ‘Howling’ track took off unintentionally, the pair met in Berlin for two shows, and two songs were made very quickly and intuitively in their two days of rehearsal. Session/rehearsal recordings flowed naturally from there, with songs sprouting up in very different atmospheres: a ceremony space in Topenga, CA surrounded by deep forest (hence their lush track ‘Forest’); amongst the WMC madness in Miami; in rehearsals in Zurich (indeed, where their ‘Zurich’ track was magically captured); even on Frank’s farm in South Germany at Lake Constance.

First single ‘Signs' is a shining representative of Howling’s album, ‘Sacred Ground’. A wondrous synergy of both artists, with tangible elements of Frank’s characteristic sound (deep, layered, amalgamative) creeping in ever so slightly amongst the profound freeness of Ry’s vocals and production. But the project takes both artists to someplace new altogether: beautiful, hypnotic soundscapes that somehow hold a sense of abandon and a sense of being found.

“Our process was very, very organic. For both of us, it’s just about the creation. Each song has a little journey of its own. The vision’s beautiful between us because there’s a lot of trust. It’s a very intuitive process where we fall in love with one element of the song or one element of a thought, and we follow that until both of those ideas have been met.” – Ry X

Howling In 2015, the collective Children of the Light from Holland will be building a live tour with Howling, creating a bespoke, interactive light setup.

[links_clean] => [counter_player] => [counter_biog] =>

Howling’s album Sacred Ground stands for many things at once: collaboration, improvisation, simplicity, unexpected happenstance. The original track ‘Howling’ exploded virally in early 2012 (via Dixon’s Boiler Room set), though hardly past demo stage at the time, and proceeded to climb charts and win awards throughout electronic music. The track’s two humble collaborators - singer/producer/folk-electronic artist Ry X and me producer/Innervisions leader Frank Wiedemann - never saw it coming.

Nor did they expect that a few years later, despite being from two different sonic universes and living on two different sides of the world, their debut album would be pressed in Berlin. Sacred Ground will be released in May 2015 as a collaboration between Modeselektor’s archetypal Berlin label Monkeytown and Counter, an imprint of Ninja Tune.

Raised in a remote town in Australia, and now based in LA, Ry Cuming met Karlsruhe-born, Berlin-based Frank Wiedemann on Skype through a mutual friend. Ry had risen to underground-folk fame with his breakthrough hit ‘Berlin’ and band The Acid, while Wiedemann had long sat as royalty in the 4/4 scene.

After their ‘Howling’ track took off unintentionally, the pair met in Berlin for two shows, and two songs were made very quickly and intuitively in their two days of rehearsal. Session/rehearsal recordings flowed naturally from there, with songs sprouting up in very different atmospheres: a ceremony space in Topenga, CA surrounded by deep forest (hence their lush track ‘Forest’); amongst the WMC madness in Miami; in rehearsals in Zurich (indeed, where their ‘Zurich’ track was magically captured); even on Frank’s farm in South Germany at Lake Constance.

First single ‘Signs' is a shining representative of Howling’s album, ‘Sacred Ground’. A wondrous synergy of both artists, with tangible elements of Frank’s characteristic sound (deep, layered, amalgamative) creeping in ever so slightly amongst the profound freeness of Ry’s vocals and production. But the project takes both artists to someplace new altogether: beautiful, hypnotic soundscapes that somehow hold a sense of abandon and a sense of being found.

“Our process was very, very organic. For both of us, it’s just about the creation. Each song has a little journey of its own. The vision’s beautiful between us because there’s a lot of trust. It’s a very intuitive process where we fall in love with one element of the song or one element of a thought, and we follow that until both of those ideas have been met.” – Ry X

Howling

In 2015, the collective Children of the Light from Holland will be building a live tour with Howling, creating a bespoke, interactive light setup.

[tracking] => [conversions] => [hide_preorder] => 0 [hide_tracks] => 0 [hide_buy] => 0 ) ) ) [16] => Array ( [Event] => Array ( [id] => 14058 [date] => 2015-05-24 [artist] => Fink [city] => Mannheim [state] => [country] => DE [venue] => Maifeld Derby Festival [promoter] => [description] => [ticket_url] => http://www.maifeld-derby.de/tickets/ [image_upload_id] => 19785 [created] => 2015-03-30 18:13:28 [modified] => 2015-03-30 18:13:28 [year_slug] => 2015 [month_slug] => may [day_slug] => 24 [slug] => fink-mannheim-maifeld-derby-festival [description_clean] => [products_count] => 0 [hidden] => 0 [soldout] => 0 ) [Image] => Array ( [id] => 19785 [media_type] => image [artist] => Fink [title] => Fink Artist Shot 2014 [credits] => [buy_link] => [filename] => images/fink/Fink-TommyNLance-2014-2-1.jpg [checksum] => f33ac1c81dca48ea7011bb0061a2d804 [mime_type] => image/jpeg [size] => 221775 [external_url] => http://media.ninjatune.net/images/fink/Fink-TommyNLance-2014-2-1.jpg [image_upload_id] => [first_track_id] => [first_release_id] => [listed] => 0 [active] => 1 [processed] => 1 [artist_slug] => fink [slug] => fink-artist-shot-2014 [created] => 2014-08-11 14:07:33 [modified] => 2014-08-11 14:10:27 [embed] => ) [Country] => Array ( [id] => 230 [name] => Germany [longname] => Germany [numcode] => 276 [iso] => DE [iso3] => DEU [currency] => EUR [active] => 1 [parent_id] => 226 [lft] => 457 [rght] => 458 [level] => 2 ) [Product] => Array ( ) [Artist] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => 4 [name] => Fink [description] =>

Hard Believer is the new studio album by FINK: Fin Greenall on vocals/guitar, alongside bandmates Tim Thornton on drums/guitar, and Guy Whittaker on bass. It will be their first release on the R’COUP’D imprint, a label newly created by Greenall with the backing of the Ninja Tune team. Urban, bluesy, and alive, Hard Believer is inspired by life’s twists and turns, channelling hard-won triumphs and bittersweet experiences. It is a masterful collection of songs from an artist at the peak of his creative powers.

“We wanted to go deeper this time, and be more ambitious with the music,” Fin explains, “to move the sound forward without losing touch of where we’re from.” Recorded in seventeen days at Hollywood’s legendary Sound Factory studiosHard Believer is shot through with rawness and controlled aggression; an album replete with calm beginnings seguing into powerfully hypnotic loops and climactic finales.“It’s performance-oriented rather than track-oriented,” Fin says. “We recorded a lot of the vocals at the same time as the acoustic guitars so they aren’t always perfectly synchronised. But we like that honesty in our recordings.”

With Thornton and Whittaker now as trusted co-writers, work on the new songs began after the Perfect Darkness/Wheels tour finished in India in late 2012, continuing on subsequent trips to LA (where Greenall also wrote tracks for the William H Macy movie Rudderless, and with John Legend for the 12 Years a Slave soundtrack album). After a year of intensive writing sessions in Amsterdam, Brighton and London, the band journeyed to California to reunite with producer Billy Bush (Garbage, Beck, Foster the People). Other contributors to the album include Dutch jazz pianist Ruben Hein, with strings courtesy of Matt Kelly and Andrew Phillips.

The new album presents ten brand new songs, including the mighty “Shakespeare”, a tale of young love gone tragically sour as the mood darkens from acoustic to guttural rock; the spiky yet delicate “Looking Too Closely”, riding an irresistible piano-and-guitar groove; “Green And The Blue”, on which a vulnerable Greenall meditates on the constants in life that see you through tough times; “Two Days Later”, a deeply personal lament and one of only two songs that start and remain down-tempo; and the breathtaking “Pilgrim”, the latest collaboration with songwriter Blair Mackichan, co-writer of “This Is The Thing” from Fink’s 2007 Distance and Time, and “Honesty” from 2011’s Perfect Darkness.

Hard Believer continues the bold expansion of folk’s parameters begun by its predecessor, Perfect Darkness: “A delight… you don’t want it to end,” glowed a Guardian review, and at times on the epic 18-month tour that followed, it felt as if it never would. Such was the global popularity of the album that it also spawned not one, but two live records: 2012’s Wheels Turn Beneath My Feet, and 2013’s Fink Meets the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, which repurposed the songs as rolling mini-symphonies with one of the greatest symphony orchestras in the world. The campaign concluded with the release of final single “Warm Shadow,” accompanied by a cover of the song from Justin Vernon and Colin Stetson of Bon Iver.

Greenall has always been a guitarist; self-taught at a young age, it was a quiet and personal gift he kept largely to himself. He began creating trip-hop music in college, leading to his first purely electronic album Fresh Produce, released on Ninja Tune’s N-Tone label in 2000. It was six “long-assed” and “brutal” years of DJing before his next record, 2006’s Biscuits for Breakfast, unveiled the radical new singer-songwriter direction. Greenall had initially envisaged only a partial transition from the world of electronica, but it was Ninja Tune who insisted he either commit fully to the shift from behind the decks, or not at all. “Their encouragement helped me make one of the most important decisions of my career,” he admits.

Another big influence on the transition was producing and co-writing tracks for others from his basement studio; among them the actor Michael Pitt, and a teenage Amy Winehouse. “She blew my mind,” Greenall says. “At the time, if you didn’t look like one of Girls Aloud it was game over. Amy reminded us that it’s what you sound like and have to say, that counts.” One of their collaborations, “Half Time”, produced by Salaam Remi, can be heard on her posthumous collection Lioness: Hidden Treasures.

Much like Fink albums of the past, Hard Believer covers wide ground. Musically it explores folk, electronica, blues, and rock. But it’s the songwriting that really propels Fink into a new space: a serious evolution that should see him regarded as one of the UK’s great modern-day songwriters. “The term ‘Hard Believer’ comes from deep-south Americana; it means somebody who is difficult to persuade, who requires proof.” In truth, all anyone has to do here is listen to the powerful collection of songs on Hard Believer. The belief will surely follow.

[links] =>

Fink Website

Facebook
Twitter
Soundcloud

[image_upload_id] => 19785 [label_id] => 13 [twitter_username] => Finkmusic [instagram_id] => [instagram_username] => [link] => [listed] => 1 [sortname] => Fink [created] => 2010-07-17 22:15:58 [modified] => 2015-03-16 17:46:48 [slug] => fink [fuga_id] => [description_clean] =>

Hard Believer is the new studio album by FINK: Fin Greenall on vocals/guitar, alongside bandmates Tim Thornton on drums/guitar, and Guy Whittaker on bass. It will be their first release on the R’COUP’D imprint, a label newly created by Greenall with the backing of the Ninja Tune team. Urban, bluesy, and alive, Hard Believer is inspired by life’s twists and turns, channelling hard-won triumphs and bittersweet experiences. It is a masterful collection of songs from an artist at the peak of his creative powers.

“We wanted to go deeper this time, and be more ambitious with the music,” Fin explains, “to move the sound forward without losing touch of where we’re from.” Recorded in seventeen days at Hollywood’s legendary Sound Factory studiosHard Believer is shot through with rawness and controlled aggression; an album replete with calm beginnings seguing into powerfully hypnotic loops and climactic finales.“It’s performance-oriented rather than track-oriented,” Fin says. “We recorded a lot of the vocals at the same time as the acoustic guitars so they aren’t always perfectly synchronised. But we like that honesty in our recordings.”

With Thornton and Whittaker now as trusted co-writers, work on the new songs began after the Perfect Darkness/Wheels tour finished in India in late 2012, continuing on subsequent trips to LA (where Greenall also wrote tracks for the William H Macy movie Rudderless, and with John Legend for the 12 Years a Slave soundtrack album). After a year of intensive writing sessions in Amsterdam, Brighton and London, the band journeyed to California to reunite with producer Billy Bush (Garbage, Beck, Foster the People). Other contributors to the album include Dutch jazz pianist Ruben Hein, with strings courtesy of Matt Kelly and Andrew Phillips.

The new album presents ten brand new songs, including the mighty “Shakespeare”, a tale of young love gone tragically sour as the mood darkens from acoustic to guttural rock; the spiky yet delicate “Looking Too Closely”, riding an irresistible piano-and-guitar groove; “Green And The Blue”, on which a vulnerable Greenall meditates on the constants in life that see you through tough times; “Two Days Later”, a deeply personal lament and one of only two songs that start and remain down-tempo; and the breathtaking “Pilgrim”, the latest collaboration with songwriter Blair Mackichan, co-writer of “This Is The Thing” from Fink’s 2007 Distance and Time, and “Honesty” from 2011’s Perfect Darkness.

Hard Believer continues the bold expansion of folk’s parameters begun by its predecessor, Perfect Darkness: “A delight… you don’t want it to end,” glowed a Guardian review, and at times on the epic 18-month tour that followed, it felt as if it never would. Such was the global popularity of the album that it also spawned not one, but two live records: 2012’s Wheels Turn Beneath My Feet, and 2013’s Fink Meets the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, which repurposed the songs as rolling mini-symphonies with one of the greatest symphony orchestras in the world. The campaign concluded with the release of final single “Warm Shadow,” accompanied by a cover of the song from Justin Vernon and Colin Stetson of Bon Iver.

Greenall has always been a guitarist; self-taught at a young age, it was a quiet and personal gift he kept largely to himself. He began creating trip-hop music in college, leading to his first purely electronic album Fresh Produce, released on Ninja Tune’s N-Tone label in 2000. It was six “long-assed” and “brutal” years of DJing before his next record, 2006’s Biscuits for Breakfast, unveiled the radical new singer-songwriter direction. Greenall had initially envisaged only a partial transition from the world of electronica, but it was Ninja Tune who insisted he either commit fully to the shift from behind the decks, or not at all. “Their encouragement helped me make one of the most important decisions of my career,” he admits.

Another big influence on the transition was producing and co-writing tracks for others from his basement studio; among them the actor Michael Pitt, and a teenage Amy Winehouse. “She blew my mind,” Greenall says. “At the time, if you didn’t look like one of Girls Aloud it was game over. Amy reminded us that it’s what you sound like and have to say, that counts.” One of their collaborations, “Half Time”, produced by Salaam Remi, can be heard on her posthumous collection Lioness: Hidden Treasures.

Much like Fink albums of the past, Hard Believer covers wide ground. Musically it explores folk, electronica, blues, and rock. But it’s the songwriting that really propels Fink into a new space: a serious evolution that should see him regarded as one of the UK’s great modern-day songwriters. “The term ‘Hard Believer’ comes from deep-south Americana; it means somebody who is difficult to persuade, who requires proof.” In truth, all anyone has to do here is listen to the powerful collection of songs on Hard Believer. The belief will surely follow.

[links_clean] =>

Fink Website

Facebook
Twitter
Soundcloud

[counter_player] => [counter_biog] => [tracking] => [conversions] => [hide_preorder] => 0 [hide_tracks] => 0 [hide_buy] => 0 ) ) ) [17] => Array ( [Event] => Array ( [id] => 13682 [date] => 2015-05-25 [artist] => Young Fathers [city] => Manchester [state] => [country] => GB [venue] => Gorilla [promoter] => [description] => [ticket_url] => http://www.gigsandtours.com/event/young-fathers/gorilla/836989 [image_upload_id] => 20364 [created] => 2014-12-11 16:54:25 [modified] => 2015-01-05 11:54:33 [year_slug] => 2015 [month_slug] => may [day_slug] => 25 [slug] => young-fathers-manchester-gorilla [description_clean] => [products_count] => 0 [hidden] => 0 [soldout] => 0 ) [Image] => Array ( [id] => 20364 [media_type] => image [artist] => Young Fathers [title] => Young Fathers Press Shot 2014 [credits] => [buy_link] => [filename] => images/young-fathers/timspicoct1.jpg [checksum] => d16561a1f0ef8f6ecbf82b02a6bdc0ad [mime_type] => image/jpeg [size] => 151449 [external_url] => [image_upload_id] => [first_track_id] => [first_release_id] => [listed] => 0 [active] => 1 [processed] => 1 [artist_slug] => young-fathers [slug] => young-fathers-press-shot-2014 [created] => 2014-12-05 10:51:10 [modified] => 2014-12-05 10:51:12 [embed] => ) [Country] => Array ( [id] => 208 [name] => United Kingdom [longname] => United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland [numcode] => 826 [iso] => GB [iso3] => GBR [currency] => GBP [active] => 1 [parent_id] => 191 [lft] => 413 [rght] => 414 [level] => 2 ) [Product] => Array ( ) [Artist] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => 198 [name] => Young Fathers [description] =>

Young Fathers were christened in 2008, named after the fact that all three members were named for their fathers..

They are:

‘G’ Hastings, from Drylaw, Edinburgh, Alloysious Massaquoi, originally from Liberia via Ghana and Kayus Bankole, born in Edinburgh to Nigerian parents but partially raised in Maryland in the USA, all 27 years old. Their live shows are complimented by Steven Morrison (drums & DJ) and Lauren Holt (AKA LAWholt - vocals).

The group formed after meeting at an under-16s hiphop night at the infamous Bongo Club in Edinburgh when they were all 14 years old. Almost immediately they started writing and recording together, initially on an old karoake machine plugged into a cheap cassette recorderat G’s parents house.

After going through various guises over several years and after hooking up with a local production company, they eventually settled on the name Young Fathers and recorded their first album with Tim Brinkhurst (AKA London) as producer. The recordings included their first single, Straight Back On It, which was given a limited release in 2009 and was received well enough to get them a couple of TV appearances, plays on BBC radio, some festival dates and the support slots with Simian Mobile Disco and Esser on UK tours.

Straight Back On It, a bang-on-the-money pop song built around Afrika Bambaataa’s reworking of Kraftwerk, was indicative of the rest of the album, Inconceivable Child… Conceived, in as much as the album was a state of the art teenage pop collection. Unfortunately the album was never released; however, another single, separately recorded, Automatic, was given a limited online release, but failed to have much impact.

In 2011 and after writing and recording yet another, unreleased album, the group decided a radical change was necessary and they finally disconnected themselves from the local production company and took control of their destiny. Recording mini-album (or ‘mixtape’ as it was called) TAPE ONE in just over a week, finishing a track a day and having it available for download within two weeks of recording gave them renewed vigour. They quickly followed this up by recording TAPE TWO in a similar fashion. Los Angeles based alt-hiphop label, Anticon, discovered them online and within a few months had signed them up for a short deal that saw both TAPEs officially released in 2013.

The group, meanwhile, continued to tour, gathering an impressive reputation as a fierce live act. They played all over Europe and made their US debut at SxSW in Austin, Texas, in March 2013.

Following support from the BBC’s Zane Lowe and Lauren Laverne, and an appearance on influential USA talk show, Jimmy Kimmel in 2014, TAPE TWO won Scottish Album Of The Year (‘The SAY Award’) and this was followed by their latest album, DEAD, released this time on Anticon in the USA and Big Dada in the UK and Europe, receiving the Mercury Award for best album of 2014. They won as the underdogs and there was a minor controversy because they didn’t look particularly joyful at the presentation and because they refused to speak to some of the more right wing press covering the event.

Immediately after winning the Mercury, YFs travelled to Berlin where they continued making their new album in a freezing basement in a building near the railway yards. Returning to the more familiar (and warmer) basement studio in Edinburgh where most of their recordings were made, to finish the album, they ended 2014 by playing a home town show at Edinburgh’s Hogmanay New year’s Eve festival in front of several thousand people.

The new album, White Men Are Black Men Too, has been recorded at various places around the world, including Melbourne and London as well as Berlin and Edinburgh and features the Leith Congregational Choir on a couple of tracks.

Young Fathers played over 140 shows during 2014, including On Blackheath Festival (curated by Massive Attack). They toured the UK, large swathes of Europe and did a six week stint in the USA. The new year already has them booked to play even more. White Men Are Black Men Too is due for release in April.

[links] => [image_upload_id] => 20542 [label_id] => 2 [twitter_username] => youngfathers [instagram_id] => [instagram_username] => [link] => [listed] => 1 [sortname] => Young Fathers [created] => 2013-10-18 16:52:18 [modified] => 2015-03-31 14:34:35 [slug] => young-fathers [fuga_id] => [description_clean] =>

Young Fathers were christened in 2008, named after the fact that all three members were named for their fathers..

They are:

‘G’ Hastings, from Drylaw, Edinburgh, Alloysious Massaquoi, originally from Liberia via Ghana and Kayus Bankole, born in Edinburgh to Nigerian parents but partially raised in Maryland in the USA, all 27 years old. Their live shows are complimented by Steven Morrison (drums & DJ) and Lauren Holt (AKA LAWholt - vocals).

The group formed after meeting at an under-16s hiphop night at the infamous Bongo Club in Edinburgh when they were all 14 years old. Almost immediately they started writing and recording together, initially on an old karoake machine plugged into a cheap cassette recorderat G’s parents house.

After going through various guises over several years and after hooking up with a local production company, they eventually settled on the name Young Fathers and recorded their first album with Tim Brinkhurst (AKA London) as producer. The recordings included their first single, Straight Back On It, which was given a limited release in 2009 and was received well enough to get them a couple of TV appearances, plays on BBC radio, some festival dates and the support slots with Simian Mobile Disco and Esser on UK tours.

Straight Back On It, a bang-on-the-money pop song built around Afrika Bambaataa’s reworking of Kraftwerk, was indicative of the rest of the album, Inconceivable Child… Conceived, in as much as the album was a state of the art teenage pop collection. Unfortunately the album was never released; however, another single, separately recorded, Automatic, was given a limited online release, but failed to have much impact.

In 2011 and after writing and recording yet another, unreleased album, the group decided a radical change was necessary and they finally disconnected themselves from the local production company and took control of their destiny. Recording mini-album (or ‘mixtape’ as it was called) TAPE ONE in just over a week, finishing a track a day and having it available for download within two weeks of recording gave them renewed vigour. They quickly followed this up by recording TAPE TWO in a similar fashion. Los Angeles based alt-hiphop label, Anticon, discovered them online and within a few months had signed them up for a short deal that saw both TAPEs officially released in 2013.

The group, meanwhile, continued to tour, gathering an impressive reputation as a fierce live act. They played all over Europe and made their US debut at SxSW in Austin, Texas, in March 2013.

Following support from the BBC’s Zane Lowe and Lauren Laverne, and an appearance on influential USA talk show, Jimmy Kimmel in 2014, TAPE TWO won Scottish Album Of The Year (‘The SAY Award’) and this was followed by their latest album, DEAD, released this time on Anticon in the USA and Big Dada in the UK and Europe, receiving the Mercury Award for best album of 2014. They won as the underdogs and there was a minor controversy because they didn’t look particularly joyful at the presentation and because they refused to speak to some of the more right wing press covering the event.

Immediately after winning the Mercury, YFs travelled to Berlin where they continued making their new album in a freezing basement in a building near the railway yards. Returning to the more familiar (and warmer) basement studio in Edinburgh where most of their recordings were made, to finish the album, they ended 2014 by playing a home town show at Edinburgh’s Hogmanay New year’s Eve festival in front of several thousand people.

The new album, White Men Are Black Men Too, has been recorded at various places around the world, including Melbourne and London as well as Berlin and Edinburgh and features the Leith Congregational Choir on a couple of tracks.

Young Fathers played over 140 shows during 2014, including On Blackheath Festival (curated by Massive Attack). They toured the UK, large swathes of Europe and did a six week stint in the USA. The new year already has them booked to play even more. White Men Are Black Men Too is due for release in April.

[links_clean] => [counter_player] => [counter_biog] => [tracking] => [conversions] => [hide_preorder] => 0 [hide_tracks] => 0 [hide_buy] => 0 ) ) ) )
<< Previous
Artist Date City Venue Buy
Portico Tuesday, May 19th Ris Orangis, FR Le Plan 2
Young Fathers Wednesday, May 20th Glasgow, GB Glasgow Art School Buy
Portico Wednesday, May 20th Strasbourg, FR La Laiterie Buy
Young Fathers Thursday, May 21st Newcastle, GB Riverside Club Buy
Howling Thursday, May 21st Dublin, IE Button Factory Buy
Young Fathers Friday, May 22nd Leeds, GB Brudenell Social Club Buy
Portico Friday, May 22nd Brussels, BE AB Buy
Howling Friday, May 22nd London, GB Oval Space Buy
ODESZA Friday, May 22nd Bradley, California, US Lightning In A Bottle Buy
Young Fathers Saturday, May 23rd Galloway, GB Knockengorroch Buy
The Cinematic Orchestra Saturday, May 23rd London, GB The Roundhouse Buy
ODESZA Saturday, May 23rd Quincy, Washington, US Sasquatch Festival Buy
Portico Saturday, May 23rd The Hague, NL Paard Van Troje Buy
Fink Saturday, May 23rd Dortmund, DE Way Back When Buy
Maribou State (DJ) Saturday, May 23rd Lincoln, GB Lost Village Festival Buy
Howling Sunday, May 24th Glasgow, GB Sub Club Buy
Fink Sunday, May 24th Mannheim, DE Maifeld Derby Festival Buy
Young Fathers Monday, May 25th Manchester, GB Gorilla Buy
Next >>