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Fink @ Cabaret Sauvage, Paris.

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Fink @ Cabaret Sauvage, Paris.

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Fin Greenall, who is the voice and heart behind Fink, often gets mistaken for other people. 

At the BMI Awards in the US, a ‘roomful of gangstas and playas’ were convinced the Cornwall-born, Bristol-raised Englishman was a lawyer, and not a songwriter picking up an ‘American Urban’ gong – one of three BMIs he received for his work with John Legend on the soul singer’s Evolver album.

In Berlin, clubbing capital of the world, they think he helps run a small minimal techno label. In certain London circles he’s known as the hardworking insider whose past roles at DefJam, Sony Music, Talkin’ Loud, and Source saw him work with a range of artists longer than the horizon. At the BBC, they imagine Fink as perhaps the only musician who has played both the Electric Proms and the actual Proms (was that really the same guy leading a 120-piece orchestra at the Royal Albert Hall in an ‘immense’ cover of Roy Ayers’ Everybody Loves The Sunshine?). 

In record company circles, he’s the producer who worked on the first demos by Amy Winehouse and the writer who’s been crafting hooks for Professor Green. In big-room booths around the world, he’s the internationally-renowned DJ and Ninja Tune stalwart who finally hung up his Sennheisers with a valedictory set at London’s Fabric in 2003. ‘My skillset just seemed so old compared to these guys that could DJ for six hours without one high-hat out of place using Ableton or something,’ he notes admiringly.

Who is Fin Greenall? All of the above. 

Yes, the now-Brighton-based musician acknowledges, he has done – does do – all of those things. ‘But none of that is as important as how I feel when I write songs like "Fear is Like Fire" and "Perfect Darkness". The Fink thing is my main thing.’

As a kid, the one thing of his dad’s that Fin Greenall wasn’t allowed to touch was the old Martin acoustic guitar. ‘It was his one possession where he said, “everything in this house is owned by everybody – apart from that.”’ But with age – and the burgeoning of his son’s skills as a player – came a relaxation of the exclusion zone: Greenall plays the Martin on the punchy, Jeff Buckley-covering-Radiohead-esque "Fear Is Like Fire". It’s sure to become a live stand-out on Fink’s upcoming, 18-month-long world tour. ‘It’s all about trying to look at fear and be optimistic – you can be really negative or fucking embrace it and use it. 

‘The great thing about growing up in a house where music is a big factor,’ he continues, ‘was the fact that music being part of your life was a perfectly natural thing.’ 

Music, it seems, became more than that: it was Greenall’s life. He hoovered up the sounds he heard on John Peel: ‘The Cure, The Smiths, The Orb, African music, Japanese hardcore’. He embraced skateboarding, the music and the fashion – ‘it was an awesome way to grow your own culture’. At university in Leeds, electronic and dance music became everything. 

‘It was definitely about wanting to be part of a revolution that I could call my own,’ he recalls. ‘A couple of friends and I clubbed together our student loans and bought equipment to make ambient techno – we were really inspired by Aphex Twin and The Orb and Moby. We were amazed at how fucking easy it was to make ambient techno. It wasn’t easy to make good ambient techno,’ he laughs. ‘But it was easy enough to make techno good enough to get us signed after six months of mucking around at uni.’ 

The young techno warrior was messianic. 

‘I thought the song was dead, the chorus was dead, playing drums and guitar and bass was so old-school and outdated and why would you want to do that? Dylan did that 50 years ago! We should be part of this new revolution, instrumentalism, acid house, rave culture, techno – this stuff is a brave new avant-garde frontier and you should be involved.’ 

His ardour and his skills saw Greenall become part of the Ninja Tune family – first signed on the back of a cassette-tape demo - as artist, DJ, writer, producer, and remixer. 

‘Brilliant times,’ he sighs nostalgically. ‘Sometimes you’d just have to pinch yourself. Then, other times, you wake up in Bratislava on a Tuesday morning and you’re reminded that there is hard work to all of this.’ All that crate-digging wasn’t all it’s cracked up to be either: ‘You can’t be shit!’ Greenall grins. ‘And because of the community that Ninja has worldwide, if you are shit everybody knows about it the next day. Eight years of DJing have given me an obscenely huge record collection. I just cleared out the breaks section – four crates of twelves that were total pony!’ 

So the wheels of steel started to fall off. 

‘It wasn’t until I’d run that right the way through to its natural conclusion – I’m an international DJ on the biggest DJ label in the world – that I thought: I’m kinda over it. And it was actually working with a young artist straight out of school called Amy Winehouse that inspired me to go, “wow, songs are great! Now I get how difficult it is, and how much talent there is involved in this. It’s more of a challenge than clubbing.”’ 

Greenall melted down his turntables and recast them as a guitar and a stool. Metaphorically speaking. His parents were pleased. ‘My career only made sense to them when I picked up a guitar and started to sing,’ he says. ‘All of a sudden I was doing music, I wasn’t just mucking around. But in my rave days, DJing techno and breaks, they didn’t get that at all. That’s probably why I did it in the first place. 

‘But I realised: if your music had songs in it, it had a much greater reach. Not in business terms, but if a singer of, say, Amy’s calibre sings over this beat, it becomes so much bigger than just a beat. I can’t get rid of my clubbing past, not that I’d want to. But the linear nature of some of my music is definitely because of all those years spent clubbing and DJing, when a very simple idea can make the best club record. And it’s the same with songs – I’m after a really simple riff or really simple lyric or melody. And it’s about keeping that beautiful moment going for as long as you can.’

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[image_upload_id] => 18384 [label_id] => 1 [twitter_username] => Finkmusic [instagram_id] => [instagram_username] => [link] => [listed] => 1 [sortname] => Fink [created] => 2010-07-17 22:15:58 [modified] => 2013-08-22 13:03:49 [slug] => fink [fuga_id] => [description_clean] =>

Fin Greenall, who is the voice and heart behind Fink, often gets mistaken for other people. 

At the BMI Awards in the US, a ‘roomful of gangstas and playas’ were convinced the Cornwall-born, Bristol-raised Englishman was a lawyer, and not a songwriter picking up an ‘American Urban’ gong – one of three BMIs he received for his work with John Legend on the soul singer’s Evolver album.

In Berlin, clubbing capital of the world, they think he helps run a small minimal techno label. In certain London circles he’s known as the hardworking insider whose past roles at DefJam, Sony Music, Talkin’ Loud, and Source saw him work with a range of artists longer than the horizon. At the BBC, they imagine Fink as perhaps the only musician who has played both the Electric Proms and the actual Proms (was that really the same guy leading a 120-piece orchestra at the Royal Albert Hall in an ‘immense’ cover of Roy Ayers’ Everybody Loves The Sunshine?). 

In record company circles, he’s the producer who worked on the first demos by Amy Winehouse and the writer who’s been crafting hooks for Professor Green. In big-room booths around the world, he’s the internationally-renowned DJ and Ninja Tune stalwart who finally hung up his Sennheisers with a valedictory set at London’s Fabric in 2003. ‘My skillset just seemed so old compared to these guys that could DJ for six hours without one high-hat out of place using Ableton or something,’ he notes admiringly.

Who is Fin Greenall? All of the above. 

Yes, the now-Brighton-based musician acknowledges, he has done – does do – all of those things. ‘But none of that is as important as how I feel when I write songs like "Fear is Like Fire" and "Perfect Darkness". The Fink thing is my main thing.’

As a kid, the one thing of his dad’s that Fin Greenall wasn’t allowed to touch was the old Martin acoustic guitar. ‘It was his one possession where he said, “everything in this house is owned by everybody – apart from that.”’ But with age – and the burgeoning of his son’s skills as a player – came a relaxation of the exclusion zone: Greenall plays the Martin on the punchy, Jeff Buckley-covering-Radiohead-esque "Fear Is Like Fire". It’s sure to become a live stand-out on Fink’s upcoming, 18-month-long world tour. ‘It’s all about trying to look at fear and be optimistic – you can be really negative or fucking embrace it and use it. 

‘The great thing about growing up in a house where music is a big factor,’ he continues, ‘was the fact that music being part of your life was a perfectly natural thing.’ 

Music, it seems, became more than that: it was Greenall’s life. He hoovered up the sounds he heard on John Peel: ‘The Cure, The Smiths, The Orb, African music, Japanese hardcore’. He embraced skateboarding, the music and the fashion – ‘it was an awesome way to grow your own culture’. At university in Leeds, electronic and dance music became everything. 

‘It was definitely about wanting to be part of a revolution that I could call my own,’ he recalls. ‘A couple of friends and I clubbed together our student loans and bought equipment to make ambient techno – we were really inspired by Aphex Twin and The Orb and Moby. We were amazed at how fucking easy it was to make ambient techno. It wasn’t easy to make good ambient techno,’ he laughs. ‘But it was easy enough to make techno good enough to get us signed after six months of mucking around at uni.’ 

The young techno warrior was messianic. 

‘I thought the song was dead, the chorus was dead, playing drums and guitar and bass was so old-school and outdated and why would you want to do that? Dylan did that 50 years ago! We should be part of this new revolution, instrumentalism, acid house, rave culture, techno – this stuff is a brave new avant-garde frontier and you should be involved.’ 

His ardour and his skills saw Greenall become part of the Ninja Tune family – first signed on the back of a cassette-tape demo - as artist, DJ, writer, producer, and remixer. 

‘Brilliant times,’ he sighs nostalgically. ‘Sometimes you’d just have to pinch yourself. Then, other times, you wake up in Bratislava on a Tuesday morning and you’re reminded that there is hard work to all of this.’ All that crate-digging wasn’t all it’s cracked up to be either: ‘You can’t be shit!’ Greenall grins. ‘And because of the community that Ninja has worldwide, if you are shit everybody knows about it the next day. Eight years of DJing have given me an obscenely huge record collection. I just cleared out the breaks section – four crates of twelves that were total pony!’ 

So the wheels of steel started to fall off. 

‘It wasn’t until I’d run that right the way through to its natural conclusion – I’m an international DJ on the biggest DJ label in the world – that I thought: I’m kinda over it. And it was actually working with a young artist straight out of school called Amy Winehouse that inspired me to go, “wow, songs are great! Now I get how difficult it is, and how much talent there is involved in this. It’s more of a challenge than clubbing.”’ 

Greenall melted down his turntables and recast them as a guitar and a stool. Metaphorically speaking. His parents were pleased. ‘My career only made sense to them when I picked up a guitar and started to sing,’ he says. ‘All of a sudden I was doing music, I wasn’t just mucking around. But in my rave days, DJing techno and breaks, they didn’t get that at all. That’s probably why I did it in the first place. 

‘But I realised: if your music had songs in it, it had a much greater reach. Not in business terms, but if a singer of, say, Amy’s calibre sings over this beat, it becomes so much bigger than just a beat. I can’t get rid of my clubbing past, not that I’d want to. But the linear nature of some of my music is definitely because of all those years spent clubbing and DJing, when a very simple idea can make the best club record. And it’s the same with songs – I’m after a really simple riff or really simple lyric or melody. And it’s about keeping that beautiful moment going for as long as you can.’

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) ) ) [1] => Array ( [Event] => Array ( [id] => 10475 [date] => 2012-11-06 [artist] => Cadence Weapon [city] => Washington, DC [state] => [country] => US [venue] => DC9 [promoter] => [description] => [ticket_url] => [image_upload_id] => 3892 [created] => 2012-08-23 10:11:48 [modified] => 2012-08-23 10:11:48 [year_slug] => 2012 [month_slug] => nov [day_slug] => 6 [slug] => cadence-weapon-washington-dc-dc9 [description_clean] => [products_count] => 0 [hidden] => 0 ) [Image] => Array ( [id] => 3892 [media_type] => image [artist] => Cadence Weapon [title] => Promo Shot (Migrated) [credits] => [buy_link] => [filename] => images/cadence-weapon/cadence-1.jpg [checksum] => d36ba655ef1c770e9d10f9f1c73e9c21 [mime_type] => image/jpeg [size] => 859068 [external_url] => http://media.ninjatune.net/images/cadence-weapon/cadence-1.jpg [image_upload_id] => [first_track_id] => [first_release_id] => [listed] => 0 [active] => 1 [processed] => 1 [artist_slug] => cadence-weapon [slug] => promo-shot-migrated-67 [created] => 2010-11-24 03:40:21 [modified] => 2010-11-24 03:40:21 [embed] => ) [Country] => Array ( [id] => 122 [name] => United States [longname] => United States of America [numcode] => 840 [iso] => US [iso3] => USA [currency] => USD [active] => 1 [parent_id] => 117 [lft] => 241 [rght] => 242 [level] => 2 ) [Product] => Array ( ) [Artist] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => 72 [name] => Cadence Weapon [description] =>

Roland "Rollie" Pemberton aka Cadence Weapon had never released an album, but by age 18 had become an infamous hip-hop reviewer at online indie music mecca Pitchfork, also writing reviews for Stylus and Wired magazines. He launched his own mp3 blog, RazorBladeRunner - now retired - and began remixing artists as a producer and posting his home mixes on his blog, to much critical acclaim. Early in 2005 Cadence Weapon decided to compile some of his favourite remixes and freestyles and released his "Cadence Weapon Is The Black Hand" mixtape, sold only online and at shows. Canadian label Upper Class Recordings signed Mr. Pemberton on the spot. "Breaking Kayfabe"was released in Canada to instant praise and notoriety, culminating in two prized nominations; a Plug Independent Award for Best Rap Album and the Polaris Music Prize (modeled after the Mercury Prize). Anti/Epitaph Records, signed Cadence Weapon for the USA. In conjunction with Cadence's SXSW 2006 performances, Breaking Kayfabe was released in the USA March 13 through Upper Class/Epitaph. Big Dada re-released "Breaking Kayfabe" for the rest of the world and, in 2008, followed it up with "After Party Babies." He released a new album, "Hope In Dirt City" in 2012.

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Roland "Rollie" Pemberton aka Cadence Weapon had never released an album, but by age 18 had become an infamous hip-hop reviewer at online indie music mecca Pitchfork, also writing reviews for Stylus and Wired magazines. He launched his own mp3 blog, RazorBladeRunner - now retired - and began remixing artists as a producer and posting his home mixes on his blog, to much critical acclaim. Early in 2005 Cadence Weapon decided to compile some of his favourite remixes and freestyles and released his "Cadence Weapon Is The Black Hand" mixtape, sold only online and at shows. Canadian label Upper Class Recordings signed Mr. Pemberton on the spot.

"Breaking Kayfabe"was released in Canada to instant praise and notoriety, culminating in two prized nominations; a Plug Independent Award for Best Rap Album and the Polaris Music Prize (modeled after the Mercury Prize).

Anti/Epitaph Records, signed Cadence Weapon for the USA. In conjunction with Cadence's SXSW 2006 performances, Breaking Kayfabe was released in the USA March 13 through Upper Class/Epitaph. Big Dada re-released "Breaking Kayfabe" for the rest of the world and, in 2008, followed it up with "After Party Babies." He released a new album, "Hope In Dirt City" in 2012.

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) ) ) [2] => Array ( [Event] => Array ( [id] => 10572 [date] => 2012-11-06 [artist] => The Heavy [city] => Berlin [state] => [country] => DE [venue] => Frannz Club [promoter] => [description] => [ticket_url] => http://www.eventim.de/cgi-bin/the-heavy-Tickets-berlin.html?affiliate=EVE&doc=artistPages%2Ftickets&fun=artist&action=tickets&ke [image_upload_id] => 16903 [created] => 2012-09-10 17:37:46 [modified] => 2012-09-10 17:37:46 [year_slug] => 2012 [month_slug] => nov [day_slug] => 6 [slug] => the-heavy-berlin-frannz-club [description_clean] => [products_count] => 0 [hidden] => 0 ) [Image] => Array ( [id] => 16903 [media_type] => image [artist] => The Heavy [title] => Heavy Artist Shot 2012 1 [credits] => [buy_link] => [filename] => images/the-heavy/theheavy-promoshot1.jpg [checksum] => 333ca971966ac881a09d97d3ec798fb0 [mime_type] => image/jpeg [size] => 76818 [external_url] => http://media.ninjatune.net/images/the-heavy/theheavy-promoshot1.jpg [image_upload_id] => [first_track_id] => [first_release_id] => [listed] => 0 [active] => 1 [processed] => 1 [artist_slug] => the-heavy [slug] => heavy-artist-shot-2012-1 [created] => 2012-05-23 13:49:14 [modified] => 2012-05-23 13:49:21 [embed] => ) [Country] => Array ( [id] => 230 [name] => Germany [longname] => Germany [numcode] => 276 [iso] => DE [iso3] => DEU [currency] => EUR [active] => 1 [parent_id] => 226 [lft] => 457 [rght] => 458 [level] => 2 ) [Product] => Array ( ) [Artist] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => 71 [name] => The Heavy [description] =>

“What the hell were we thinking?,” exclaims Dan Taylor, guitarist for U.K. indie soul-rock titans The Heavy, of the band’s audacious album, The Glorious Dead. “We wanted to make a bold statement – it’s not shy, but a beast unto itself.” “It’s over the top, but in a good way,” adds charismatic Heavy frontman Kelvin Swaby. “With this record, we went pretty cinematic: we basically set out to score a film that hasn’t been written.” 

Indeed, The Glorious Dead proves singular: Frankensteining everything from swampy voodoo and b-movie zombies with garage-rock guitars and Gospel-soaked soul, it becomes a whole other creature feature unlike anything else you’ll hear this year. The Glorious Dead isn’t just The Heavy’s third full-length: it’s also the group’s most ambitious effort, traveling sonically from the group’s South England home to America’s deep South, and beyond. It’s also building off momentum from The Heavy’s greatest success, the international smash single “How You Like Me Now?,” off the band’s acclaimed previous album, 2009’s The House That Dirt Built

An infectious anthem of hard-rocking maximum R&B, “How You Like Me Now?” exploded upon release: it became the first song David Letterman’s ever requested an encore for when The Heavy played it on his “Late Show,” and has appeared everywhere from “Entourage” episodes, Academy Award-nominated film The Fighter, and the trailer for the new Mark Wahlberg comedy Ted. “How You Like Me Now?” continues to enthrall: on the recent climax of the 2012 season of NBC’s hit show “The Voice,” Adam Levine’s team contestant Tony Lucca performed the song to massive acclaim. “That was surreal,” says Taylor. “It’s taken on legs of its own. I can’t complain, but I wouldn’t want to be known for one song – it’s not our peak.” 

“It’s such a big tune, people ask, ‘How are you going to top that?’,” Swaby adds. “But we’re not going to lie down and play dead.” 

As such, The Glorious Dead rockets out of the grave with supernatural force. Alternately haunting and relentless, album opener “Can’t Play Dead” thunders as if Jack White remixed “Ghost Town” by The Specials. It’s followed by “Curse Me Good,” which provides a jarring contrast with its sweet whistled hook, George Harrison-meets-T.Rex acoustic strum, and a heartbreaking soul vocal from Swaby. “It’s good to have a bit of light and shade amid the onslaught of heavy guitars,” Taylor explains. “I find we’re always trying to recreate the diversity of, say, The White Album, but with beats.” 

Likewise, “Big Bad Wolf” combines primal howling à la Screamin’ Jay Hawkins, funkdafied breakbeats, and eerie electronics that recall Luniz’ stoned rap classic “I Got 5 On It.” “Think vintage, but keep it contemporary – that’s our approach,” Swaby explains. “It’s integral to make everything sound like samples from our record collection, but with a modern edge. We’re not afraid to use technology, and everything needs to have that tight, heavyweight bottom end.” 

Epitomizing this all-inclusive strategy is The Glorious Dead’s centerpiece breakthrough track, “What Makes A Good Man?” Defiant yet uplifting, “What Makes A Good Man?” contrasts Swaby’s gritty soul searching with girl-group call-and-response vocals and soaring, epic strings. Its creation provided the spark that would prove crucial to the album’s inception. Looking to soak up some Southern Gothic inspiration, The Heavy traveled far from their hometown near Bath, England all the way to Columbus, Georgia on the advice of their U.S. tour-bus driver, Sam Phillips. There, Phillips hooked the group up with a number of church-trained singers and players: they would take Swaby and Taylor’s song ideas to another realm, like singer/keyboardist Lloyd Buchanan’s intense contribution to “…Good Man?” “We had the beat and the chorus for ‘Good Man,’ and when Lloyd started jamming on the B-3 and singing on it, I was like, ‘This is going to be insane,’” Swaby says. “The Gospel singers started doing the chorus they already knew they song – they made it sound like the Supremes or Ronettes. It was an incredible feeling: after that, we were on our merry way.”

Taking the material to yet another level was the contribution of Gabriel “Bosco Mann” Roth, Daptone Records co-founder and bandleader of Sharon Jones & the Dap-Kings, with whom The Heavy had toured extensively. Roth ended up scoring innovative string and horn parts to four of The Glorious Dead’s ten songs. “It doesn’t sound like what Gabriel does with the Dap-Kings,” Taylor says. “He got into the mindset to do something different.” “He’s such a talented entity,” Swaby continues. “I couldn’t believe what was coming out of the speakers. It was so fitting, with this vintage sound, and amazing beauty. It reminded me of these black-and-white films I used to watch as a kid.” 

Film loomed as large an influence on The Glorious Dead as music. As key inspirations, Taylor cites the tweaked Americana of Jim Jarmusch’s Down By Law and the voodoo vibes of the James Bond classic Live and Let Die alongside ‘60s Mod rave-ups and the atmospheric Brit multiculturalism of Fun Boy Three and The Specials; Swaby, meanwhile, explored low-budget horror flicks alongside the controlled screaming of garage-rockers The Sonics, Tom Waits’ elastic growl, and soul giants Al Green and Otis Redding. 

Starting in January 2011, Taylor, Swaby, and bandmates Spencer Page (bass) and Chris Ellul (drums) began combining these ingredients into their own idiosyncratic blend – a process launched by The Heavy building their own studio and choosing to produce The Glorious Dead themselves. To mix the results, the band first worked with longtime associate Jim Abbiss (Adele, Arctic Monkeys) at Peter Gabriel’s famed Real World complex, then finished up with Paul Corkett (The Cure, Nick Cave, Björk). “Self-producing was all about being self-sufficient in realizing the vision we had,” Taylor says. “Your third record is judged as to whether you’re there to stay, or slide off the face of the earth. We want to stick around, so we took our balls out and went for it.” “I love what we’ve done,” adds Swaby. “We got our deadpan heartbreak down. This record suggests how we continue to walk among the dead – now just in a few more places, and with more of a swagger.”

The Glorious Dead spawned the mighty lead single 'What Makes a Good Man?' a funk-ridden, soul-wrenching study of a deep spiritual question. What Makes A Good Man? has been featured in trailers for HBO, Lawless, Borderlands 2 and Elementary, and the band gave TV performances on The Late Show with David Letterman, Last Call With Carson Daly and The Late Late Show With Craig Ferguson. 

Since the dawn of The Glorious Dead, The Heavy have done anything other than rest on their laurels. 2013 has seen them reprise their smash hit 'How You Like Me Now?' for ESPN's Draft Week. The song was reworked to feature a guest verse from none other than 50 Cent, who happily enveloped himself in The Heavy's swamp-funk, and even performed in a brand new video. Since then, the song has gone on to reach Gold status in the USA, a stunning success from a British band on a label as independent as they are. 

The Heavy came back to the US to perform at Spike TV's Guys Choice Awards as the house band in June 2013. Touring in 2013 has so far been a SOLD OUT UK Tour, an EU Tour in May, plus USA and Canadian dates in June and August, with another EU/UK Tour booked for the end of the year. Festival highlights this summer include Ottawa Jazz Festival, Rock-A-Field in Luxembourg, Hove in Norway, T In The Park in Scotland, Glastonbury and WOMAD in England, Osheaga in Montreal, Outside Lands in San Francisco and Afropunk in New York. 

To date, this true original of a band have sold 750,000 singles and over 150,000 albums. Long live The Heavy

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“What the hell were we thinking?,” exclaims Dan Taylor, guitarist for U.K. indie soul-rock titans The Heavy, of the band’s audacious album, The Glorious Dead. “We wanted to make a bold statement – it’s not shy, but a beast unto itself.” “It’s over the top, but in a good way,” adds charismatic Heavy frontman Kelvin Swaby. “With this record, we went pretty cinematic: we basically set out to score a film that hasn’t been written.” 

Indeed, The Glorious Dead proves singular: Frankensteining everything from swampy voodoo and b-movie zombies with garage-rock guitars and Gospel-soaked soul, it becomes a whole other creature feature unlike anything else you’ll hear this year. The Glorious Dead isn’t just The Heavy’s third full-length: it’s also the group’s most ambitious effort, traveling sonically from the group’s South England home to America’s deep South, and beyond. It’s also building off momentum from The Heavy’s greatest success, the international smash single “How You Like Me Now?,” off the band’s acclaimed previous album, 2009’s The House That Dirt Built

An infectious anthem of hard-rocking maximum R&B, “How You Like Me Now?” exploded upon release: it became the first song David Letterman’s ever requested an encore for when The Heavy played it on his “Late Show,” and has appeared everywhere from “Entourage” episodes, Academy Award-nominated film The Fighter, and the trailer for the new Mark Wahlberg comedy Ted. “How You Like Me Now?” continues to enthrall: on the recent climax of the 2012 season of NBC’s hit show “The Voice,” Adam Levine’s team contestant Tony Lucca performed the song to massive acclaim. “That was surreal,” says Taylor. “It’s taken on legs of its own. I can’t complain, but I wouldn’t want to be known for one song – it’s not our peak.” 

“It’s such a big tune, people ask, ‘How are you going to top that?’,” Swaby adds. “But we’re not going to lie down and play dead.” 

As such, The Glorious Dead rockets out of the grave with supernatural force. Alternately haunting and relentless, album opener “Can’t Play Dead” thunders as if Jack White remixed “Ghost Town” by The Specials. It’s followed by “Curse Me Good,” which provides a jarring contrast with its sweet whistled hook, George Harrison-meets-T.Rex acoustic strum, and a heartbreaking soul vocal from Swaby. “It’s good to have a bit of light and shade amid the onslaught of heavy guitars,” Taylor explains. “I find we’re always trying to recreate the diversity of, say, The White Album, but with beats.” 

Likewise, “Big Bad Wolf” combines primal howling à la Screamin’ Jay Hawkins, funkdafied breakbeats, and eerie electronics that recall Luniz’ stoned rap classic “I Got 5 On It.” “Think vintage, but keep it contemporary – that’s our approach,” Swaby explains. “It’s integral to make everything sound like samples from our record collection, but with a modern edge. We’re not afraid to use technology, and everything needs to have that tight, heavyweight bottom end.” 

Epitomizing this all-inclusive strategy is The Glorious Dead’s centerpiece breakthrough track, “What Makes A Good Man?” Defiant yet uplifting, “What Makes A Good Man?” contrasts Swaby’s gritty soul searching with girl-group call-and-response vocals and soaring, epic strings. Its creation provided the spark that would prove crucial to the album’s inception. Looking to soak up some Southern Gothic inspiration, The Heavy traveled far from their hometown near Bath, England all the way to Columbus, Georgia on the advice of their U.S. tour-bus driver, Sam Phillips. There, Phillips hooked the group up with a number of church-trained singers and players: they would take Swaby and Taylor’s song ideas to another realm, like singer/keyboardist Lloyd Buchanan’s intense contribution to “…Good Man?” “We had the beat and the chorus for ‘Good Man,’ and when Lloyd started jamming on the B-3 and singing on it, I was like, ‘This is going to be insane,’” Swaby says. “The Gospel singers started doing the chorus they already knew they song – they made it sound like the Supremes or Ronettes. It was an incredible feeling: after that, we were on our merry way.”

Taking the material to yet another level was the contribution of Gabriel “Bosco Mann” Roth, Daptone Records co-founder and bandleader of Sharon Jones & the Dap-Kings, with whom The Heavy had toured extensively. Roth ended up scoring innovative string and horn parts to four of The Glorious Dead’s ten songs. “It doesn’t sound like what Gabriel does with the Dap-Kings,” Taylor says. “He got into the mindset to do something different.” “He’s such a talented entity,” Swaby continues. “I couldn’t believe what was coming out of the speakers. It was so fitting, with this vintage sound, and amazing beauty. It reminded me of these black-and-white films I used to watch as a kid.” 

Film loomed as large an influence on The Glorious Dead as music. As key inspirations, Taylor cites the tweaked Americana of Jim Jarmusch’s Down By Law and the voodoo vibes of the James Bond classic Live and Let Die alongside ‘60s Mod rave-ups and the atmospheric Brit multiculturalism of Fun Boy Three and The Specials; Swaby, meanwhile, explored low-budget horror flicks alongside the controlled screaming of garage-rockers The Sonics, Tom Waits’ elastic growl, and soul giants Al Green and Otis Redding. 

Starting in January 2011, Taylor, Swaby, and bandmates Spencer Page (bass) and Chris Ellul (drums) began combining these ingredients into their own idiosyncratic blend – a process launched by The Heavy building their own studio and choosing to produce The Glorious Dead themselves. To mix the results, the band first worked with longtime associate Jim Abbiss (Adele, Arctic Monkeys) at Peter Gabriel’s famed Real World complex, then finished up with Paul Corkett (The Cure, Nick Cave, Björk). “Self-producing was all about being self-sufficient in realizing the vision we had,” Taylor says. “Your third record is judged as to whether you’re there to stay, or slide off the face of the earth. We want to stick around, so we took our balls out and went for it.” “I love what we’ve done,” adds Swaby. “We got our deadpan heartbreak down. This record suggests how we continue to walk among the dead – now just in a few more places, and with more of a swagger.”

The Glorious Dead spawned the mighty lead single 'What Makes a Good Man?' a funk-ridden, soul-wrenching study of a deep spiritual question. What Makes A Good Man? has been featured in trailers for HBO, Lawless, Borderlands 2 and Elementary, and the band gave TV performances on The Late Show with David Letterman, Last Call With Carson Daly and The Late Late Show With Craig Ferguson. 

Since the dawn of The Glorious Dead, The Heavy have done anything other than rest on their laurels. 2013 has seen them reprise their smash hit 'How You Like Me Now?' for ESPN's Draft Week. The song was reworked to feature a guest verse from none other than 50 Cent, who happily enveloped himself in The Heavy's swamp-funk, and even performed in a brand new video. Since then, the song has gone on to reach Gold status in the USA, a stunning success from a British band on a label as independent as they are. 

The Heavy came back to the US to perform at Spike TV's Guys Choice Awards as the house band in June 2013. Touring in 2013 has so far been a SOLD OUT UK Tour, an EU Tour in May, plus USA and Canadian dates in June and August, with another EU/UK Tour booked for the end of the year. Festival highlights this summer include Ottawa Jazz Festival, Rock-A-Field in Luxembourg, Hove in Norway, T In The Park in Scotland, Glastonbury and WOMAD in England, Osheaga in Montreal, Outside Lands in San Francisco and Afropunk in New York. 

To date, this true original of a band have sold 750,000 singles and over 150,000 albums. Long live The Heavy

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) ) ) [3] => Array ( [Event] => Array ( [id] => 10673 [date] => 2012-11-06 [artist] => Anti-Pop Consortium [city] => Paris [state] => [country] => FR [venue] => La Gaite Lyrique [promoter] => [description] => [ticket_url] => [image_upload_id] => 3868 [created] => 2012-10-11 14:49:28 [modified] => 2012-10-11 14:49:28 [year_slug] => 2012 [month_slug] => nov [day_slug] => 6 [slug] => anti-pop-consortium-paris-la-gaite-lyrique [description_clean] => [products_count] => 0 [hidden] => 0 ) [Image] => Array ( [id] => 3868 [media_type] => image [artist] => Anti-Pop Consortium [title] => Promo Shot (Migrated) [credits] => [buy_link] => [filename] => images/anti-pop-consortium/antipop-1.jpg [checksum] => 5bc750706f10e5cd18f6548887f294fe [mime_type] => image/jpeg [size] => 3815437 [external_url] => http://media.ninjatune.net/images/anti-pop-consortium/antipop-1.jpg [image_upload_id] => [first_track_id] => [first_release_id] => [listed] => 0 [active] => 1 [processed] => 1 [artist_slug] => anti-pop-consortium [slug] => promo-shot-migrated-43 [created] => 2010-11-24 03:36:36 [modified] => 2010-11-24 03:36:36 [embed] => ) [Country] => Array ( [id] => 229 [name] => France [longname] => France [numcode] => 250 [iso] => FR [iso3] => FRA [currency] => EUR [active] => 1 [parent_id] => 226 [lft] => 455 [rght] => 456 [level] => 2 ) [Product] => Array ( ) [Artist] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => 10 [name] => Anti-Pop Consortium [description] =>

Anti-Pop Consortium formed in 1997 when Beans, High Priest, M. Sayyid and producer Earl Blaize met at a poetry slam in New York City. The four of them put out a series of mixtapes (proper cassettes!) on their own Anti-Pop Records and called them “Consortium” volumes 1, 2 and 3. The people who were picking up the tapes began to refer to the coalition behind them as the Anti-Pop Consortium and the group as we now know it was born. 

The Consortium’s emblem – a stylised corporate stick figure with a burning head – was also already in place, created by the graphical smarts of High Priest himself. With it, the team began their assault with an infamous xerox and sticker campaign that landed Priest in jail for vandalism under Giuliani's “increased standard of living regime.” Coupled with the verbal pyrotechnics of their live show, the Consortium gained the favor of both staunch B-boy purists and experimental electronics heads. The backpackers were in awe of the group’s varied and contrasting, quickfire rhyme styles, whereas the techies loved their four man MPC jams.

 Dan The Automator signed the group to be the first act on his new imprint, 75 Ark. The result was “Tragic Epilogue,” an album made up of tracks taken from the last mixtape plus some new material. It was swiftly followed by “Shopping Carts Crashing,” released on a Japanese label and exported to fans across the world. But then, in an iconic move, APC signed to UK electronic label, Warp .

The classic “Arrhythmia” followed in 2002 and took APC’s sound to a worldwide audience. To promote it they went out on Radiohead’s world tour and returned to the States to go straight out on a giant DJ Shadow tour. The album was receiving great notices and cemented their status as landmark innovators. But differences over their next creative step, plus the pressures of constant touring all took their toll. “We broke up,” Sayyid explains, “six months after that record was released.” 

In 2007 the group re-formed and signed to Big Dada for the release of "Fluorescent Black." The album was once again rapturously received and the group have been touring on and off since. 

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[image_upload_id] => 3870 [label_id] => 2 [twitter_username] => antipopny [instagram_id] => [instagram_username] => [link] => [listed] => 0 [sortname] => Anti-Pop Consortium [created] => 2010-07-17 22:15:58 [modified] => 2014-03-06 10:12:48 [slug] => anti-pop-consortium [fuga_id] => [description_clean] =>

Anti-Pop Consortium formed in 1997 when Beans, High Priest, M. Sayyid and producer Earl Blaize met at a poetry slam in New York City. The four of them put out a series of mixtapes (proper cassettes!) on their own Anti-Pop Records and called them “Consortium” volumes 1, 2 and 3. The people who were picking up the tapes began to refer to the coalition behind them as the Anti-Pop Consortium and the group as we now know it was born. 

The Consortium’s emblem – a stylised corporate stick figure with a burning head – was also already in place, created by the graphical smarts of High Priest himself. With it, the team began their assault with an infamous xerox and sticker campaign that landed Priest in jail for vandalism under Giuliani's “increased standard of living regime.” Coupled with the verbal pyrotechnics of their live show, the Consortium gained the favor of both staunch B-boy purists and experimental electronics heads. The backpackers were in awe of the group’s varied and contrasting, quickfire rhyme styles, whereas the techies loved their four man MPC jams.

 Dan The Automator signed the group to be the first act on his new imprint, 75 Ark. The result was “Tragic Epilogue,” an album made up of tracks taken from the last mixtape plus some new material. It was swiftly followed by “Shopping Carts Crashing,” released on a Japanese label and exported to fans across the world. But then, in an iconic move, APC signed to UK electronic label, Warp .

The classic “Arrhythmia” followed in 2002 and took APC’s sound to a worldwide audience. To promote it they went out on Radiohead’s world tour and returned to the States to go straight out on a giant DJ Shadow tour. The album was receiving great notices and cemented their status as landmark innovators. But differences over their next creative step, plus the pressures of constant touring all took their toll. “We broke up,” Sayyid explains, “six months after that record was released.” 

In 2007 the group re-formed and signed to Big Dada for the release of "Fluorescent Black." The album was once again rapturously received and the group have been touring on and off since. 

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) ) ) [4] => Array ( [Event] => Array ( [id] => 10718 [date] => 2012-11-06 [artist] => DJ Kentaro [city] => Melbourne [state] => [country] => AU [venue] => The Espy Hotel [promoter] => [description] => [ticket_url] => http://www.songkick.com/tickets/9696729?u=5906736 [image_upload_id] => 15475 [created] => 2012-11-06 17:08:27 [modified] => 2012-11-06 17:08:27 [year_slug] => 2012 [month_slug] => nov [day_slug] => 6 [slug] => dj-kentaro-melbourne-the-espy-hotel [description_clean] => [products_count] => 0 [hidden] => 0 ) [Image] => Array ( [id] => 15475 [media_type] => image [artist] => DJ Kentaro [title] => DJ Kentaro - Promo Shot 2011 [credits] => [buy_link] => [filename] => images/dj-kentaro/kentaro-solidsteeltheend2008bymartinlesantosmith.jpg [checksum] => f517ac1df1ad0fb992502fbb68f17a17 [mime_type] => image/jpeg [size] => 1772356 [external_url] => http://media.ninjatune.net/images/dj-kentaro/kentaro-solidsteeltheend2008bymartinlesantosmith.jpg [image_upload_id] => [first_track_id] => [first_release_id] => [listed] => 0 [active] => 1 [processed] => 1 [artist_slug] => dj-kentaro [slug] => dj-kentaro-promo-shot-2011 [created] => 2011-03-10 12:42:07 [modified] => 2011-03-10 12:42:16 [embed] => ) [Country] => Array ( [id] => 238 [name] => Australia [longname] => Australia [numcode] => 36 [iso] => AU [iso3] => AUS [currency] => AUD [active] => 1 [parent_id] => 237 [lft] => 473 [rght] => 474 [level] => 2 ) [Product] => Array ( ) [Artist] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => 62 [name] => DJ Kentaro [description] =>

"DJ Kentaro may be a turntablist - a world-beating turntablist, in fact, having taken the DMC World Championship title in 2002 - but that doesn't mean that only spotty geezers in puffas and baseball caps need to look out for him. Because hip hop and scratching represent merely one side of Kentaro's multi-faceted musical persona." - IDJ Magazine

"More than just a technical DJ, Kentaro is a performer, inciting the crowd into a frenzy while titillating the scratch fetishists. Starting with the Roots and winding up with Pharcyde, Wayne Marshall and Sizzla - with cut and juggle excursions through all the other artists from all over the world, hip-hop, reggae, drumn' bass, house, electro and jungle - he slid easily to a second victory." - Blast Magazine

On September 18th 2002, DJ Kentaro (Kentaro Okamoto) re-tried for the DMC World Championship and claimed the title with the first ever perfect score in DMC World history. Dedicating his winning 6 minute set to his "no walls between the music" ethos, DJ Kentaro finally took 2 gold Technics 1200s and a matching Technics DJ mixer to its home country.

Kentaro's blend of hip-hop, breaks, drum & bass and turntablism is untouchable. He is a mad dexterous surgeon, who slices and dices beats into a breathtaking sonic concoction in his Sendai laboratory and at events all over the world. When Kentaro is behind a set of 1200s and a mixer, he's on stage: sometimes he's shy, sometimes he's sassy, but we've never heard him be anything short of absolutely splendid.

Where some turntablists are content to fill their routines with the same ol' thang, Kentaro uses his awesome technique to move beyond the crab scratch and has catapulted drum 'n' bass and dance music into a realm that nobody else has yet to explore. 'My Favorite Songs' - Kentaro's first ever mix CD - stands as a testament to his pioneering vision of melding the mentality of a battler with the street smarts and savvy of the hip-hop elite.

Lauded for years by hip-hop aficionados, Kentaro has won the respect of Japan's 'Hip Hop Best Artists' (tied winner was Eminem) which explains why revered Japanese labels like Endeavor Entertainment, W + Kennedy Tokyo Lab, Artimage and Jazzysport, Undiluted and Virus have presented him with exclusive tracks you won't be able to hear anywhere else. And let's not forget Kentaro's exclusive turntablist cut ups - mind blowing pastiches that are all ahead of its time. Kentaro is moving at the speed of vox. Sleep on his skills and he's gonna leave you in the dust.

DJ Kentaro, number one DJ in the world, and it's just the beginning...

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www.djkentaro.jp

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[image_upload_id] => 3935 [label_id] => 1 [twitter_username] => DJKENTARO [instagram_id] => [instagram_username] => [link] => [listed] => 0 [sortname] => DJ Kentaro [created] => 2010-07-17 22:15:59 [modified] => 2014-03-06 10:14:18 [slug] => dj-kentaro [fuga_id] => [description_clean] =>

"DJ Kentaro may be a turntablist - a world-beating turntablist, in fact, having taken the DMC World Championship title in 2002 - but that doesn't mean that only spotty geezers in puffas and baseball caps need to look out for him. Because hip hop and scratching represent merely one side of Kentaro's multi-faceted musical persona." - IDJ Magazine

"More than just a technical DJ, Kentaro is a performer, inciting the crowd into a frenzy while titillating the scratch fetishists. Starting with the Roots and winding up with Pharcyde, Wayne Marshall and Sizzla - with cut and juggle excursions through all the other artists from all over the world, hip-hop, reggae, drumn' bass, house, electro and jungle - he slid easily to a second victory." - Blast Magazine

On September 18th 2002, DJ Kentaro (Kentaro Okamoto) re-tried for the DMC World Championship and claimed the title with the first ever perfect score in DMC World history. Dedicating his winning 6 minute set to his "no walls between the music" ethos, DJ Kentaro finally took 2 gold Technics 1200s and a matching Technics DJ mixer to its home country.

Kentaro's blend of hip-hop, breaks, drum & bass and turntablism is untouchable. He is a mad dexterous surgeon, who slices and dices beats into a breathtaking sonic concoction in his Sendai laboratory and at events all over the world. When Kentaro is behind a set of 1200s and a mixer, he's on stage: sometimes he's shy, sometimes he's sassy, but we've never heard him be anything short of absolutely splendid.

Where some turntablists are content to fill their routines with the same ol' thang, Kentaro uses his awesome technique to move beyond the crab scratch and has catapulted drum 'n' bass and dance music into a realm that nobody else has yet to explore. 'My Favorite Songs' - Kentaro's first ever mix CD - stands as a testament to his pioneering vision of melding the mentality of a battler with the street smarts and savvy of the hip-hop elite.

Lauded for years by hip-hop aficionados, Kentaro has won the respect of Japan's 'Hip Hop Best Artists' (tied winner was Eminem) which explains why revered Japanese labels like Endeavor Entertainment, W + Kennedy Tokyo Lab, Artimage and Jazzysport, Undiluted and Virus have presented him with exclusive tracks you won't be able to hear anywhere else. And let's not forget Kentaro's exclusive turntablist cut ups - mind blowing pastiches that are all ahead of its time. Kentaro is moving at the speed of vox. Sleep on his skills and he's gonna leave you in the dust.

DJ Kentaro, number one DJ in the world, and it's just the beginning...

[links_clean] =>

www.djkentaro.jp

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Soundcloud

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Cadence Weapon Tuesday, Nov 6th Washington, DC, US DC9
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Anti-Pop Consortium Tuesday, Nov 6th Paris, FR La Gaite Lyrique
DJ Kentaro Tuesday, Nov 6th Melbourne, AU The Espy Hotel Buy
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