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Manchester born, London based 24 year old producer/dj/composer Sam Shepherd aka Floating Points has quickly become one of the most respected and sought-after musicians in modern music. Debuting in February 2009 with the limited 7 inch ‘For You/Radiality’ (Eglo records) he has gone on to establish himself as one the forerunners of today’s new dance music movement, earning the respect of his peers and contemporaries such as Theo Parrish, Kyle Hall, Benji B, Ramadanman, Four Tet, Kode 9 and Mary Anne Hobbs. He's released music predominantly on Eglo records (which he runs alongside Rinse FM’s Alexander Nut), as well as Planet Mu, R2, Ninja Tune and notching up remixes and features for the likes of Domino, Ubiquity, XL, Fabric and Rinse.

The name Floating Points holds just much weight within the DJ world as its does in production, song writing and arrangement. In a short space of time Shepherd has won over crowds around the world with his strictly vinyl club sessions, spanning, house, techno, soul and disco, steadily climbing the ranks of the globes most impressive DJ’s, fuelling an indulgent record habit that regularly leads him on trips to both Chicago and Detroit.

Outside of his studio based productions and crate-breaking DJ sets Shepherd makes use of his classical music training, writing, composing and arranging for the Floating Points Ensemble. The 16 piece group, led by Shepherd, recently won the ‘Best Maida Vale Session’ gong at Gilles Peterson’s ‘Worldwide Awards’. With big plans for 2011 the future is looking bright for Floating Points. When not writing, recording or playing music Sam Shepherd can be found in the laboratories of UCL, where is currently studying a PHD in 'The Neuroscience Of Pain'.

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Manchester born, London based 24 year old producer/dj/composer Sam Shepherd aka Floating Points has quickly become one of the most respected and sought-after musicians in modern music. Debuting in February 2009 with the limited 7 inch ‘For You/Radiality’ (Eglo records) he has gone on to establish himself as one the forerunners of today’s new dance music movement, earning the respect of his peers and contemporaries such as Theo Parrish, Kyle Hall, Benji B, Ramadanman, Four Tet, Kode 9 and Mary Anne Hobbs. He's released music predominantly on Eglo records (which he runs alongside Rinse FM’s Alexander Nut), as well as Planet Mu, R2, Ninja Tune and notching up remixes and features for the likes of Domino, Ubiquity, XL, Fabric and Rinse.

The name Floating Points holds just much weight within the DJ world as its does in production, song writing and arrangement. In a short space of time Shepherd has won over crowds around the world with his strictly vinyl club sessions, spanning, house, techno, soul and disco, steadily climbing the ranks of the globes most impressive DJ’s, fuelling an indulgent record habit that regularly leads him on trips to both Chicago and Detroit.

Outside of his studio based productions and crate-breaking DJ sets Shepherd makes use of his classical music training, writing, composing and arranging for the Floating Points Ensemble. The 16 piece group, led by Shepherd, recently won the ‘Best Maida Vale Session’ gong at Gilles Peterson’s ‘Worldwide Awards’. With big plans for 2011 the future is looking bright for Floating Points. When not writing, recording or playing music Sam Shepherd can be found in the laboratories of UCL, where is currently studying a PHD in 'The Neuroscience Of Pain'.

[links_clean] =>

Facebook
Twitter

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Simon Green, AKA Bonobo, is an artist very much at the peak of his powers. His 2013 album ‘The North Borders’ was the high watermark of his career to date: a masterful record, marrying Green's inimitable melodic genius to cutting edge electronics, bass and drums. 

An artist that constantly pushes himself outside of his musical comfort zone, Bonobo’s ranging personal tastes and regularly expanding range of synthesizers and instruments continue to take his productions to new levels. This outlook has earned him a reputation as one of the most pioneering figures in electronic music, in both his solo DJ sets and 12-piece live band shows. 

All this comes as the result of over ten years hard work, and five albums that have honed Green's skills. A born musician, Green - like many artists - expresses himself most articulately via his music. The result is that his work is always keenly felt, and always feels imperative. There are no wasted moments, and myriad great ones. 

It's tempting to relate Green's yearning, emotive aesthetic to his upbringing in rural Hampshire. His move to Brighton is also an influence; his skill at drum programming perhaps harking back to his days DJing and producing in the small, musically fertile town. Under the initial guidance of Tru Thoughts' Rob Luis and at nights such as Phonic:hoop, Bonobo found an early education in music. 

His first album - 2000's 'Animal Magic' - was released via Tru Thoughts before being picked up by Ninja Tune. It announced him as a serious talent; able to bring a true musician's edge to electronic music, with all the freedom that skill allowed. His subsequent albums for Ninja, Dial M for Monkey and Days to Come, developed his sensibility, won him fans across the globe, and saw him develop his live show into a mesmeric re-working of his records. 

He also worked hard as a DJ, a part of Green's arsenal that perhaps truly came into its own at the same time as 2010’s Black Sands. 2012 saw him take the uptempo, club re-edits of Black Sands from a seminal Boiler Room performance in London to dance floors across the world, and unveil a new light show that further enhanced the impact of these stunning songs. A remix album was released featuring reworkings by fans and peers such as Machinedrum, Floating Points, Mark Pitchard, Lapalux and Falty DL. 

Later the same year, he finally settled down in his New York studio to write his fifth album. The North Borders was another long stride forward - both a natural evolution and a continuation of the electronic palette of Black Sands. Thematic, resonant, addictive and perfectly formed, it's a thrillingly coherent statement piece. With vocal features from no less than Erykah Badu, as well as Grey Reverend (Cinematic Orchestra) and Cornelia (Portico Quartet) it's another finely balanced body of work, leaving room for the beautiful, rich productions themselves to breathe and shine. 

Bonobo has a long history of unearthing new talent (Andreya Triana, Bajka) and The North Borders saw him do so once again. The startling vocals of new collaborator Szjerdene are sprinkled across the album, and Green has yet again found the perfect voice to express where he's at. 

Since the album’s release, Green has gone on to play over 175 shows across three continents and 30 countries, wowing audiences of almost 2 million people with the hypnotic, extended live versions of his songs. He performed sold out shows at The Sydney Opera House and Brixton Academy, and his very own, day long festival at London’s Roundhouse. 2014 saw him and his band play the iconic Coachella festival, Sonar, Glastonbury and many more.  This period of extensive touring came to a breathtaking close with his largest show to date at London’s Alexandra Palace in November. In celebration, Ninja Tune released ‘The North Borders Tour. - Live’ in October. A deluxe release including a live album, hardback book and a DVD of seminal live performances from a truly memorable tour.

It’s a full schedule and then some, but one that’s constantly rewarding for his fans, and perhaps proves that Bonobo is not only one of the world’s hardest working artists in electronic music, but also one of its best.

[links] =>

Bonobo website

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Simon Green, AKA Bonobo, is an artist very much at the peak of his powers. His 2013 album ‘The North Borders’ was the high watermark of his career to date: a masterful record, marrying Green's inimitable melodic genius to cutting edge electronics, bass and drums. 

An artist that constantly pushes himself outside of his musical comfort zone, Bonobo’s ranging personal tastes and regularly expanding range of synthesizers and instruments continue to take his productions to new levels. This outlook has earned him a reputation as one of the most pioneering figures in electronic music, in both his solo DJ sets and 12-piece live band shows. 

All this comes as the result of over ten years hard work, and five albums that have honed Green's skills. A born musician, Green - like many artists - expresses himself most articulately via his music. The result is that his work is always keenly felt, and always feels imperative. There are no wasted moments, and myriad great ones. 

It's tempting to relate Green's yearning, emotive aesthetic to his upbringing in rural Hampshire. His move to Brighton is also an influence; his skill at drum programming perhaps harking back to his days DJing and producing in the small, musically fertile town. Under the initial guidance of Tru Thoughts' Rob Luis and at nights such as Phonic:hoop, Bonobo found an early education in music. 

His first album - 2000's 'Animal Magic' - was released via Tru Thoughts before being picked up by Ninja Tune. It announced him as a serious talent; able to bring a true musician's edge to electronic music, with all the freedom that skill allowed. His subsequent albums for Ninja, Dial M for Monkey and Days to Come, developed his sensibility, won him fans across the globe, and saw him develop his live show into a mesmeric re-working of his records. 

He also worked hard as a DJ, a part of Green's arsenal that perhaps truly came into its own at the same time as 2010’s Black Sands. 2012 saw him take the uptempo, club re-edits of Black Sands from a seminal Boiler Room performance in London to dance floors across the world, and unveil a new light show that further enhanced the impact of these stunning songs. A remix album was released featuring reworkings by fans and peers such as Machinedrum, Floating Points, Mark Pitchard, Lapalux and Falty DL. 

Later the same year, he finally settled down in his New York studio to write his fifth album. The North Borders was another long stride forward - both a natural evolution and a continuation of the electronic palette of Black Sands. Thematic, resonant, addictive and perfectly formed, it's a thrillingly coherent statement piece. With vocal features from no less than Erykah Badu, as well as Grey Reverend (Cinematic Orchestra) and Cornelia (Portico Quartet) it's another finely balanced body of work, leaving room for the beautiful, rich productions themselves to breathe and shine. 

Bonobo has a long history of unearthing new talent (Andreya Triana, Bajka) and The North Borders saw him do so once again. The startling vocals of new collaborator Szjerdene are sprinkled across the album, and Green has yet again found the perfect voice to express where he's at. 

Since the album’s release, Green has gone on to play over 175 shows across three continents and 30 countries, wowing audiences of almost 2 million people with the hypnotic, extended live versions of his songs. He performed sold out shows at The Sydney Opera House and Brixton Academy, and his very own, day long festival at London’s Roundhouse. 2014 saw him and his band play the iconic Coachella festival, Sonar, Glastonbury and many more.  This period of extensive touring came to a breathtaking close with his largest show to date at London’s Alexandra Palace in November. In celebration, Ninja Tune released ‘The North Borders Tour. - Live’ in October. A deluxe release including a live album, hardback book and a DVD of seminal live performances from a truly memorable tour.

It’s a full schedule and then some, but one that’s constantly rewarding for his fans, and perhaps proves that Bonobo is not only one of the world’s hardest working artists in electronic music, but also one of its best.

[links_clean] =>

Bonobo website

Facebook
Twitter
Soundcloud
Instagram

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Manchester born, London based 24 year old producer/dj/composer Sam Shepherd aka Floating Points has quickly become one of the most respected and sought-after musicians in modern music. Debuting in February 2009 with the limited 7 inch ‘For You/Radiality’ (Eglo records) he has gone on to establish himself as one the forerunners of today’s new dance music movement, earning the respect of his peers and contemporaries such as Theo Parrish, Kyle Hall, Benji B, Ramadanman, Four Tet, Kode 9 and Mary Anne Hobbs. He's released music predominantly on Eglo records (which he runs alongside Rinse FM’s Alexander Nut), as well as Planet Mu, R2, Ninja Tune and notching up remixes and features for the likes of Domino, Ubiquity, XL, Fabric and Rinse.

The name Floating Points holds just much weight within the DJ world as its does in production, song writing and arrangement. In a short space of time Shepherd has won over crowds around the world with his strictly vinyl club sessions, spanning, house, techno, soul and disco, steadily climbing the ranks of the globes most impressive DJ’s, fuelling an indulgent record habit that regularly leads him on trips to both Chicago and Detroit.

Outside of his studio based productions and crate-breaking DJ sets Shepherd makes use of his classical music training, writing, composing and arranging for the Floating Points Ensemble. The 16 piece group, led by Shepherd, recently won the ‘Best Maida Vale Session’ gong at Gilles Peterson’s ‘Worldwide Awards’. With big plans for 2011 the future is looking bright for Floating Points. When not writing, recording or playing music Sam Shepherd can be found in the laboratories of UCL, where is currently studying a PHD in 'The Neuroscience Of Pain'.

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[image_upload_id] => 14709 [label_id] => 1 [twitter_username] => floatingpoints [instagram_id] => 55726253 [instagram_username] => floatingpoints [link] => [listed] => 0 [sortname] => Floating Points [created] => 2010-11-24 11:24:03 [modified] => 2014-03-06 10:15:38 [slug] => floating-points [fuga_id] => [description_clean] =>

Manchester born, London based 24 year old producer/dj/composer Sam Shepherd aka Floating Points has quickly become one of the most respected and sought-after musicians in modern music. Debuting in February 2009 with the limited 7 inch ‘For You/Radiality’ (Eglo records) he has gone on to establish himself as one the forerunners of today’s new dance music movement, earning the respect of his peers and contemporaries such as Theo Parrish, Kyle Hall, Benji B, Ramadanman, Four Tet, Kode 9 and Mary Anne Hobbs. He's released music predominantly on Eglo records (which he runs alongside Rinse FM’s Alexander Nut), as well as Planet Mu, R2, Ninja Tune and notching up remixes and features for the likes of Domino, Ubiquity, XL, Fabric and Rinse.

The name Floating Points holds just much weight within the DJ world as its does in production, song writing and arrangement. In a short space of time Shepherd has won over crowds around the world with his strictly vinyl club sessions, spanning, house, techno, soul and disco, steadily climbing the ranks of the globes most impressive DJ’s, fuelling an indulgent record habit that regularly leads him on trips to both Chicago and Detroit.

Outside of his studio based productions and crate-breaking DJ sets Shepherd makes use of his classical music training, writing, composing and arranging for the Floating Points Ensemble. The 16 piece group, led by Shepherd, recently won the ‘Best Maida Vale Session’ gong at Gilles Peterson’s ‘Worldwide Awards’. With big plans for 2011 the future is looking bright for Floating Points. When not writing, recording or playing music Sam Shepherd can be found in the laboratories of UCL, where is currently studying a PHD in 'The Neuroscience Of Pain'.

[links_clean] =>

Facebook
Twitter

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DJ Food (present) : Strictly Kev

With nearly 25 years of DJing experience and more than a decade serving up Food for DJs, for both Ninja and Coldcut's weekly radio show 'Solid Steel', Kev is now in the Food hot seat.

At his 'Telepathic Fish' ambient parties in the early 90's he booked Matt Black on his first VJing gigs, started designing artwork for Ninja Tune and paired up with PC (Patrick Carpenter) to form the public 'face' of DJ Food on 4 decks in clubs around the world. After working on various Food and Coldcut related studio projects with PC (A Recipe for Disaster, Journeys by DJ, ColdKrushCuts and the Blech mix compilations for Warp) they released the album 'Kaleidoscope' in 2000, closely followed by the 'Quadraplex EP' in 2001.

Also arriving in 2001 was the first in a series of Solid Steel mix CDs, starting with DJ Food & DK (Darren Knott - Solid Steel's producer) and the publicly lauded 'Now, Listen'. Since then he's been constantly art directing the Ninja label, designing for artists like Amon Tobin, The Herbaliser, DJ Vadim and Funki Porcini. Mix work has included a re-score of the Monkees' cult film 'Head', an as-yet-unreleased album of vintage Sesame Street funk, and his magnum opus 'Raiding the 20th Century'. This last hour long mix / documentary was an internet only release, charting the history of the cut-up and featured journalist Paul Morley reading from his book 'Words & Music'. Not only did it crash servers on several sites that hosted it due to its initial popularity but it was later subject to a cease & desist order from EMI for multiple infringements of copyright.

In 2007, alongside DK again, he followed up their Solid Steel debut with the sequel - 'Now, Listen Again', and the pair spent much of 2008 transferring their mix into a 4 deck audio visual live show. Using Serato's video plug-in - that enables video to be mixed and scratched via turntables the same as records - they christened their efforts 'video turntablism'.

Kev is now working on a series of EPs that will make up the next DJ Food album, an exhaustive DJ Food website (www.djfood.org) and providing artwork for Ninja artists such as King Cannibal and the 20th anniversary label celebrations.

DJ Food (past):

DJ Food has been many persons, of who we will come to in a moment. DJ Food is best described as Food for DJs, simple as that, just flip it around and it begins to mean something entirely different.

Originally produced by Coldcut the DJ Food project started in 1990 with the release of 'Jazz Brakes', with 'Jazz Brakes Volume 3' being the label's most successful early album. Not only are they effective collections of breaks, loops and samples ideal for mixing, remixing and producing - but also fine collections of funky jazz & hip hop tunes, that cut it just as well on the discerning dancefloor as in the safety of your own home...

Since the growth of the abstract hip hop scene in recent years the 'Jazz Brakes' albums have proved to be ahead of their time. The latter DJ Food albums have developed with shades of latin, dub, techno, ambient, tribal, african and jungle flavouring the funk. The 2005 album 'A Recipe For Disaster' was a conscious break from the five 'Jazz Brakes' volumes to form more of an identity as an artist, and a remix album of tracks from all 6 LPs 'Refried Food' was released Feb '95.

But who made this food? Matt Black & Jonathan More (aka Coldcut) were responsible for starting the DJ Food series of 'Jazz Brakes' back in the early 90's, and along the way they met Patrick Carpenter (PC) who was commonly misconstrued as the computer that they made the tracks on for a while. A loose collaborative team began to form as more like-minded people arrived at the party; Paul Brook, Paul Rabiger, Strictly Kev and Issac Elliston to name a few.

Whilst keeping their hand in as DJs, Matt & Jon couldn't and didn't want to DJ twice in one night under both aliases of Coldcut & DJ Food, so PC & Strictly stepped up to represent the Food club-wise. This was the score for some time, until PC became so busy with his involvement in the Cinematic Orchestra that he decided to depart to concentrate on that, leaving Strictly Kev to carry the mantle.

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[image_upload_id] => 16199 [label_id] => 1 [twitter_username] => djfood [instagram_id] => [instagram_username] => [link] => [listed] => 1 [sortname] => DJ Food [created] => 2010-07-17 22:15:58 [modified] => 2014-10-21 09:55:59 [slug] => dj-food [fuga_id] => [description_clean] =>

DJ Food (present) : Strictly Kev

With nearly 25 years of DJing experience and more than a decade serving up Food for DJs, for both Ninja and Coldcut's weekly radio show 'Solid Steel', Kev is now in the Food hot seat.

At his 'Telepathic Fish' ambient parties in the early 90's he booked Matt Black on his first VJing gigs, started designing artwork for Ninja Tune and paired up with PC (Patrick Carpenter) to form the public 'face' of DJ Food on 4 decks in clubs around the world. After working on various Food and Coldcut related studio projects with PC (A Recipe for Disaster, Journeys by DJ, ColdKrushCuts and the Blech mix compilations for Warp) they released the album 'Kaleidoscope' in 2000, closely followed by the 'Quadraplex EP' in 2001.

Also arriving in 2001 was the first in a series of Solid Steel mix CDs, starting with DJ Food & DK (Darren Knott - Solid Steel's producer) and the publicly lauded 'Now, Listen'. Since then he's been constantly art directing the Ninja label, designing for artists like Amon Tobin, The Herbaliser, DJ Vadim and Funki Porcini. Mix work has included a re-score of the Monkees' cult film 'Head', an as-yet-unreleased album of vintage Sesame Street funk, and his magnum opus 'Raiding the 20th Century'. This last hour long mix / documentary was an internet only release, charting the history of the cut-up and featured journalist Paul Morley reading from his book 'Words & Music'. Not only did it crash servers on several sites that hosted it due to its initial popularity but it was later subject to a cease & desist order from EMI for multiple infringements of copyright.

In 2007, alongside DK again, he followed up their Solid Steel debut with the sequel - 'Now, Listen Again', and the pair spent much of 2008 transferring their mix into a 4 deck audio visual live show. Using Serato's video plug-in - that enables video to be mixed and scratched via turntables the same as records - they christened their efforts 'video turntablism'.

Kev is now working on a series of EPs that will make up the next DJ Food album, an exhaustive DJ Food website (www.djfood.org) and providing artwork for Ninja artists such as King Cannibal and the 20th anniversary label celebrations.

DJ Food (past):

DJ Food has been many persons, of who we will come to in a moment. DJ Food is best described as Food for DJs, simple as that, just flip it around and it begins to mean something entirely different.

Originally produced by Coldcut the DJ Food project started in 1990 with the release of 'Jazz Brakes', with 'Jazz Brakes Volume 3' being the label's most successful early album. Not only are they effective collections of breaks, loops and samples ideal for mixing, remixing and producing - but also fine collections of funky jazz & hip hop tunes, that cut it just as well on the discerning dancefloor as in the safety of your own home...

Since the growth of the abstract hip hop scene in recent years the 'Jazz Brakes' albums have proved to be ahead of their time. The latter DJ Food albums have developed with shades of latin, dub, techno, ambient, tribal, african and jungle flavouring the funk. The 2005 album 'A Recipe For Disaster' was a conscious break from the five 'Jazz Brakes' volumes to form more of an identity as an artist, and a remix album of tracks from all 6 LPs 'Refried Food' was released Feb '95.

But who made this food? Matt Black & Jonathan More (aka Coldcut) were responsible for starting the DJ Food series of 'Jazz Brakes' back in the early 90's, and along the way they met Patrick Carpenter (PC) who was commonly misconstrued as the computer that they made the tracks on for a while. A loose collaborative team began to form as more like-minded people arrived at the party; Paul Brook, Paul Rabiger, Strictly Kev and Issac Elliston to name a few.

Whilst keeping their hand in as DJs, Matt & Jon couldn't and didn't want to DJ twice in one night under both aliases of Coldcut & DJ Food, so PC & Strictly stepped up to represent the Food club-wise. This was the score for some time, until PC became so busy with his involvement in the Cinematic Orchestra that he decided to depart to concentrate on that, leaving Strictly Kev to carry the mantle.

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Most people come into music, do the same thing for a few years, slowly sink back into obscurity and spend the rest of their life collecting publishing royalties and re-forming for tribute tours. Their biographies can afford to be quite short – most of us aren’t that interested in golf or angling. The problem with Coldcut is that, despite their veteran status, they act like two unruly children who just won’t sit still. Which is why even a brief trawl through their various activities looks like a large chapter of a big book. 
In 1986, computer programmer Matt Black and ex-art teacher Jonathan More were part-time DJs on the rare groove scene. More also DJed on pirate radio, hosting the Meltdown Show on Kiss FM and worked at the Reckless Records store on Berwick Street, London where Black visited as a customer. The first collaboration between the two artists was 'Say Kids What Time Is It?' on a white label in January 1987, which mixed Jungle Book's "King of the Swingers" with the break from James Brown's "Funky Drummer." The innovation of "Say Kids..." caused More and Black to be heralded by SPIN as "the first Brit artists to really get hip-hop’s class-cutup aesthetic". It’s regarded as the UK’s first breaks record, the first UK record to be built entirely of samples and "the final link in the chain connecting European collage-experiment with the dance-remix-scratch edit". This was later sampled in "Pump Up the Volume" by MARRS, a single that reached #1 in the UK in October 1987. 
Though Black had joined Kiss FM with his own mix-based show, the pair eventually joined forces with their own show, later in 1987, called Solid Steel. The eclectic show became a unifying force in underground experimental electronic music, and is still running to date, celebrating 25 years in 2013. 
The duo adopted the name Coldcut, and set up a record label called Ahead Of Our Time to release the single Beats + Pieces (one of the formats also included "That Greedy Beat") in 1987. All of these tracks were assembled using cassette pause button edits, and later spliced tape loops that would sometimes run "all over the room.” The duo used sampling from Led Zeppelin to James Brown. Electronic act The Chemical Brothers have described ‘Beats + Pieces’ as the ‘first bigbeat record’, a style which appeared in the mid-90s. 
Coldcut's first mainstream success came when Julian Palmer from Island Records asked them to remix Eric B. & Rakim's "Paid in Full". Released in October 1987, the landmark remix is said to have "laid the groundwork for hip hop’s entry into the UK mainstream", becoming a breakthrough hit for Eric B & Rakim outside the U.S., reaching #15 in the UK and the top 20 in a number of European countries. It featured a prominent Ofra Haza sample and many other vocal cut ups as well as a looped rhythm which later, when speeded up, proved popular in the Breakbeat genre. Off the back of its success in clubs, the Coldcut "Seven Minutes of Madness" remix ended up being promoted as the single in the UK. 
In 1988, More and Black formed Hex, a self-titled "multimedia pop group," with Mile Visman and Rob Pepperell. While working on videos for artists such as Kevin Saunderson, Queen Latifah and Spiritualized, Hex’s collaborative work went on to incorporate 3D modelling, punk video art, and algorithmic visuals on desktop machines. The video for Coldcut’s ‘Christmas Break’ in 1989 is arguably one of the first pop promos produced entirely on microcomputers. 
In 1988, Coldcut released ‘Out To Lunch With Ahead Of Our Time,’ a double LP of Coldcut productions and re-cuts, and the various aliases under which the duo had recorded. This continued the duo’s tradition of releasing limited availability vinyl. 
The next Coldcut single, released in February 1988, moved towards a more house-influenced style. "Doctorin' the House", which debuted singer Yazz, became a top ten hit, and peaked at #6. In the same year, under the guise Yazz and the Plastic Population, they produced "The Only Way Is Up", a cover of a Northern Soul song. The record reached #1 in the UK in August, and remained there for five weeks, becoming 1988’s second biggest selling single. Producer Youth of Killing Joke also helped Coldcut with this record. The duo had another top hit in September with "Stop This Crazy Thing", which featured reggae vocalist Junior Reid and reached number 21 in the UK. 
The single "People Hold On" became another UK Top 20 hit. Released in March 1989, it helped launch the career of the then relatively unknown singer Lisa Stansfield. Coldcut and Mark Saunders produced her debut solo single "This Is the Right Time", which became another UK Top 20 hit in August as well as reaching #21 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 the following year. 
As the duo started to enjoy critical and commercial success, their debut album What's That Noise? was released in April 1989 on Ahead of Our Time and distributed by Big Life Records. The album gave "breaks the full length treatment", and showcased "their heady blend of hip-hop production aesthetics and proto-acid house grooves". It also rounded up a heap of unconventional guest features, quoted by SPIN as having "somehow found room at the same table for Queen Latifah and Mark E. Smith". The album’s track ‘I’m in Deep’ (featuring Smith) prefigured the Indie-dance guitar-breaks crossover of such bands as the Stone Roses and Happy Mondays, utilizing Smith’s freestyle raucous vocals over an acid house backing, and also including psych guitar samples from British rock band Deep Purple. What’s That Noise? reached the Top 20 in the UK and was certified Silver. 
Coldcut's second album, Some Like It Cold released in 1990 on Ahead Of Our Time, featured a collaboration with Queen Latifah on the single "Find a Way". Though "Find a Way" was a minor hit in the UK, no more singles were released from the album. The duo was given the BPI "Producer of the Year Award" in 1990. Hex - alongside some other London visual experimenters such as iE - produced a series of videos for a longform VHS version of the album. This continued Coldcut and Hex’s pioneering of the use of microcomputers to synthesize electronic music visuals. 
After their success with Lisa Stansfield, Coldcut signed with her label, Arista. Conflicts arose with the major label, as Coldcut’s "vision extended beyond the formulae of house and techno" and mainstream pop culture. Eventually, the duo’s album Philosophy emerged in 1993. Singles "Dreamer" and "Autumn Leaves" (1994) were both minor hits but the album did not chart. 
"Autumn Leaves" had strings recorded at Abbey Road, with a 30 piece string section and an arrangement by film composer Ed Shearmur. The leader of the string section was Simon Jeffes of Penguin Cafe Orchestra. Coldcut’s insistence on their friend Mixmaster Morris to remix "Autumn Leaves" led to one of Morris’ most celebrated remixes, which became a minor legend in ambient music. It has appeared on numerous compilations. 
In 1990, whilst on their first tour in Japan (which also featured Norman Cook, who later became Fatboy Slim), Matt and Jon formed their second record label, Ninja Tune, as a self-titled ’technocoloured escape pod,’ and a way to escape the creative control of major labels. The label enabled them to release music under different aliases (e.g.. Bogus Order, DJ Food), which also helped them to avoid pigeonholing as producers. Ninja Tune’s first release was Bogus Order’s ‘Zen Brakes.’ The name Coldcut stayed with Arista, so there were no official Coldcut releases for the next three years. 
During this time, Coldcut still produced for artists on their new label, releasing a flood of material under different names and continuing to work with young groups. They additionally kept on with Solid Steel on Kiss FM and running the night club Stealth (Club of the Year in the NME, The Face, and Mixmag in 1996). 
In 1991, Hex released their first video game, ‘Top Banana’, which was included on a Hex release for the Commodore CDTV machine in 1992, arguably the first complete purpose-designed multimedia system. ‘Top Banana’ was innovative in that it used sampled graphics, contained an ecological theme and a female lead character (dubbed ‘KT’), and its music changed through random processes. Coldcut and Hex presented this multimedia project as an example of the forthcoming convergence of pop music and computer game characters. 
In 1992, Hex’s first single - ‘Global Chaos’ / ‘Digital Love Opus 1’ - combined rave visuals with techno and ambient interactive visuals.[32] In November of that year, Hex released Global Chaos CDTV, which took advantage of the possibilities of the new CD-ROM medium. The Global Chaos CDTV disk (which contained the ‘Top Banana’ game, interactive visuals and audio), was a forerunner of the "CD+" concept, uniting music, graphics, and video games into one. This multi-dimensional entertainment product received wide coverage in the national media, including features on Dance Energy, Kaleidoscope on BBC Radio 4, What's Up Doc? on ITV and Reportage on BBC 2. i-D Magazine was quoted as saying, "It's like your TV tripping". 
Coldcut videos were made for most songs, often by Hexstatic, and used a lot of stock and sampled footage. Their ‘Timber’ video, which created an AV collage piece using analogous techniques to audio sample collage, was put on heavy rotation on MTV. Stuart Warren Hill of Hexstatic referred to this technique as: "What you see is what you hear." ‘Timber’ (which appears on both ‘Let Us Play’, Coldcut’s fourth album, and ‘Let Us Replay,’ their fifth) won awards for its innovative use of repetitive video clips synced to the music, including being shortlisted at the Edinburgh Television and Film Festival in their top five music videos of the year in 1998. 
Coldcut began integrating video sampling into their live DJ gigs at the time, and incorporated multimedia content that caused press to credit the act as segueing "into the computer age". Throughout the 90s, Hex created visuals for Coldcut’s live performances, and developed the CD-ROM portion of Coldcut’s ‘Let Us Play’ and ‘Let Us Replay,’ in addition to software developed specifically for the album’s world tour. Hex’s inclusion of music videos and ‘playtools’ (playful art/music software programs) on Coldcut’s CD-Roms was completely ahead of the curve at that time, offering viewers/listeners a high level of interactivity. Playtools such as My Little Funkit and Playtime were the prototypes for Ninja Jamm, the app Coldcut designed and launched 16 years later. Playtime followed on from Coldcut and Hex’s Synopticon installation, developing the auto-cutup algorhythm, and using other random processes to generate surprising combinations. Coldcut and Hex performed live using Playtime at the 1st Sonar Festival in 1994. Playtime was also used to generate the backing track for Coldcut’s collaboration with Jello Biafra, ‘Every Home a Prison’. 
In 1994 Coldcut and Hex contributed an installation to the Glasgow Gallery of Modern Art. The piece, called 'Generator' was installed in the Fire Gallery. Generator was an interactive installation which allowed users to mix sound, video, text and graphics and make their own audio-visual mix, modelled on the techniques and technology used by Coldcut in clubs and live performance events. It consisted of two consoles: the left controlling how the sounds are played, the right controlling how the images are played. 
As part of the JAM exhibition of "Style, Music and Media" at the Barbican Art Gallery in 1996, Coldcut and Hex were commissioned to produce an interactive audiovisual piece called Synopticon. Conceived and designed by Robert Pepperell and Matt Black, the digital culture synthesiser allows users to "remix" sounds, images, text and music in a partially random, partially controlled way. 
The year 1996 also brought the Coldcut name back to More and Black, and the pair celebrated with ‘70 Minutes of Madness,’ a mix CD that became part of the Journeys by DJ series. The release was credited with "bringing to wider attention the sort of freestyle mixing the pair were always known for through their radio show on KISS FM, Solid Steel, and their steady club dates". It was voted "Best Compilation of All Time" by Jockey Slut in 1998. 
In February 1997, they released a double pack single "Atomic Moog 2000" / "Boot the System", the first Coldcut release on Ninja Tune. This was not eligible for the UK chart because time and format restrictions prevented the inclusion of the ‘Natural Rhythm’ video on the CD. In August 1997, a reworking of the early track "More Beats + Pieces" gave them their first UK Top 40 hit since 1989. 
The album Let Us Play! followed in September and also made the Top 40. The fourth album by Coldcut, Let Us Play! paid homage to the greats that inspired them. Their first album to be released on Ninja Tune, it featured guest appearances by Grandmaster Flash, Steinski, Jello Biafra, Jimpster, The Herbaliser, Talvin Singh, Daniel Pemberton and Selena Saliva. Coldcut’s cut 'n' paste method on the album was compared to that of Dadaism and William Burroughs. Hex collaborated with Coldcut to produce the multimedia CD-Rom for the album. Hex later evolved the software into the engine that was used on the Let Us Play! world tour. 
In 1997, Matt Black - alongside Cambridge based developers Camart - created real-time video manipulation software VJamm. It allowed users to be a "digital video jockey,", remixing and collaging sound and images and trigger audio and visual samples simultaneously, subsequently bringing futuristic technology to the audio-visual field. VJamm rivalled some of the features of high-end and high cost tech at the time. The VJamm technology, praised as being proof of how far computers changed the face of live music, became seminal in both Coldcut's live sets (which were called a "revelaton" by Melody Maker and DJ sets. Their CCTV live show was featured at major festivals including Glastonbury, Roskilde, Sónar, the Montreux Jazz Festival, and John Peel's Meltdown. The "beautifully simple and devastatingly effective" software was deemed revolutionary, and became recognized as a major factor in the evolution of clubs. It eventually earned a place in the American Museum of the Moving Image's permanent collection. As quoted by The Independent: "Coldcut's motto? 'Don't hate the media, be the media." NME was quoted as saying: "Veteran duo Coldcut are so cool they invented the remix - now they are doing the same for television." 
Also working with Camart, Black designed DJamm software in 1998, which Coldcut used on laptops for their live shows, providing the audio bed alongside VJamm’s audiovisual samples. Matt Black explained they designed DJamm so they "could perform electronic music in a different way – i.e., not just taking a session band out to reproduce what you put together in the studio using samples. It had a relationship to DJing, but was more interactive and more effective." Excitingly at that time, DJamm was pioneering in its ability to shuffle sliced loops into intricate sequences, enabling users to split loops into any number of parts. 
In 1999, Let Us Replay! was released, a double-disc remix album where Coldcut’s classic tunes were remixed by the likes of Cornelius (which was heralded as a highlight of the album, Irresistible Force, Shut Up And Dance, Carl Craig and J Swinscoe. Let Us Replay! pieces together "short sharp shocks that put the mental in ‘experimental’ and still bring the breaks till the breakadawn". It also includes a few live tracks from the duo’s innovative world tour. The CD-Rom of the album, which also contained a free demo disc of the VJamm software, was one of the earliest audiovisual CD- ROMs on the market, and Muzik claimed deserved to "have them canonized...it’s like buying an entire mini studio for under $15." 
In 2000, the Solid Steel show moved to BBC London. 
Coldcut continued to forge interesting collaborations, including 2001's "Revolution," an EP in which Coldcut created their own political party (The Guilty Party). Featuring scratches and samples of Tony Blair and William Hague speeches, the 3-track EP included Nautilus' "Space Journey," which won an Intermusic contest in 2000. The video was widely played on MTV. With ‘Space Journey,’ Coldcut were arguably the first group to give fans access to the multitrack parts, or "stems," of their songs, building on the idea of interactivity and sharing from Let Us Play. 
In 2001, Coldcut produced tracks for the Sega music video game REZ. REZ replaced typical video game sound effect with electronic music; the player created sounds and melodies, intended to simulate a form of synesthesia. The soundtrack also featured Adam Freeland and Oval. 
In 2002, while utilizing VJamm and Detraktor, Coldcut and Juxta remixed Herbie Hancock’s classic ‘Rockit,’ creating both an audio and video remix. 
Working with Marcus Clements in 2002, Coldcut released the sample manipulation algorhythm from their DJamm software as a standalone VST plugin that could be used in other software, naming it the Coldcutter. 
Also in 2002, Coldcut with UK VJs Headspace (now mainly performing as the VJamm Allstars developed Gridio, an interactive, immersive audio-visual installation for the Pompidou Centre as part of the ‘Sonic Process’ exhibition. The ‘Sonic Process’ exhibition was launched at the MACBA in Barcelona in conjunction with Sónar, featuring Gridio as its centerpiece. In 2003, a commission for Graz led to a specially built version of Gridio, in a cave inside the castle mountain in Austria. Gridio was later commissioned by O2 for two simultaneous customised installations at the O2 Wireless Festivals in Leeds and London in 2007. That same year, Gridio was featured as part of Optronica at the opening week of the new BFI Southbank development in London. 
In 2003, Black worked with Penny Rimbaud (ex Crass) on Crass Agenda's Savage Utopia project. Black performed the piece with Rimbaud, Eve Libertine and other players at London’s Vortex Jazz Club. 
In 2004, Coldcut collaborated with American video mashup artist TV Sheriff to produce their cut-up entitled ‘Revolution USA.’ The tactical-media project (coordinated with Canadian art duo NomIg) followed on from the UK version and extended the premise "into an open access participatory project". Through the multimedia political art project, over 12 gigabytes of footage from the last 40 years of US politics were made accessible to download, allowing participants to create a cut-up over a Coldcut beat. Coldcut also collaborated with TV Sheriff and NomIg to produce two audiovisual pieces "World of Evil" (2004) and "Revolution '08" (2008), both composed of footage from the United States presidential elections of respective years. The music used was composed by Coldcut, with "Revolution '08" featuring a remix by the Qemists. 
Later that year, a collaboration with the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) led to the psychedelic art documentary 'Wavejammer.’ Coldcut was given access to the BAS archive in order to create sounds and visuals for the short film. 
2004 also saw Coldcut produce a radio play in conjunction with renowned young author Hari Kunzru for BBC Radio 3 (incidentally called 'Sound Mirrors'). 
Coldcut returned with the single "Everything Is Under Control” at the end of 2005, featuring Jon Spencer (of Jon Spencer Blues Explosion) and Mike Ladd. It was followed in 2006 by their fifth studio album Sound Mirrors, which was quoted as being “one of the most vital and imaginative records Jon Moore and Matt Black have ever made”, and saw the duo "continue, impressively, to find new ways to present political statements through a gamut of pristine electronics and breakbeats" (CITATION: Future Music, 2007). The fascinating array of guest vocalists included Soweto Kinch, Annette Peacock, Ameri Baraka, and Saul Williams. The latter followed on from Coldcut’s remix of Williams’ ‘The Pledge’ for a project with DJ Spooky. 
A 100-date audiovisual world tour commenced for ‘Sound Mirrors,’ which was considered "no small feat in terms of technology or human effort". Coldcut was accompanied by scratch DJ Raj and AV artist Juxta, in addition to guest vocalists from the album, including UK rapper Juice Aleem, Roots Manuva, Mpho Skeef, Jon Spencer and house legend Robert Owens. 
Three further singles were released from the album including the Top 75 hit "True Skool" with Roots Manuva. The same track appeared on the soundtrack of the video game FIFA Street 2. 
Sponsored by the British Council, in 2005 Coldcut introduced AV mixing to India with the Union project, alongside collaborators Howie B and Aki Nawaz of Fun-Da-Mental. Coldcut created an A/V remix of the Bollywood hit movie ‘Kal Ho Naa Ho’. 
In 2006, Coldcut performed an A/V set based on "Music for 18 Musicians" as part of Steve Reich’s 70th birthday gig at the Barbican Centre in London. 
Coldcut remixed another classic song in 2007: Nina Simone’s ‘Save Me.’ This was part of a remix album called ‘Nina Simone: Remixed & Re-imagined,’ featuring remixes from Tony Humphries, Francois K and Chris Coco. 
In February 2007, Coldcut and Mixmaster Morris created a psychedelic AV obituary/tribute Coldcut, Mixmaster Morris, Ken Campbell, Bill Drummond and Alan Moore (18 March 2007). Robert Anton Wilson tribute show. Queen Elizabeth Hall, London: Mixmaster Morris. (28 August 2009) to Robert Anton Wilson, the 60s author of Illuminatus! Trilogy. The tribute featured graphic novel writer Alan Moore and artist Bill Drummond and a performance by experimental theatre legend Ken Campbell. Coldcut and Morris’ hour and a half performance resembled a documentary being remixed on the fly, cutting up nearly 15 hours’ worth of Wilson’s lectures. 
In 2008, an international group of party organisers, activists and artists including Coldcut received a grant from the Intelligent Energy Department of the European Union, to create a project that promoted intelligent energy and environmental awareness to the youth of Europe. The result was Energy Union, a piece of VJ cinema, political campaign, music tour, party, art exhibition and social media hub. Energy Union toured 12 EU countries throughout 2009 and 2010, completing 24 events in total. Coldcut created the Energy Union show for the tour, a one-hour Audio/Visual montage on the theme of Intelligent Energy. In presenting new ideas for climate, environmental and energy communication strategies, the Energy Union tour was well received, and reached a widespread audience in cities across the UK, Germany, Belgium, The Netherlands, Croatia, Slovenia, Austria, Hungary, Bulgaria, Spain and the Czech Republic. 
Also in 2008, Coldcut was asked to remix the theme song for British cult TV show Doctor Who for the program’s 40th anniversary. In October 2008, Coldcut celebrated the legacy of the BBC Radiophonic Workshop (the place where the Doctor Who theme was created) with a live DJ mix at London’s legendary Roundhouse. The live mix incorporated classic Radiophonic Workshop compositions with extended sampling of the original gear. 
Additionally in 2008, Coldcut remixed "Ourselves", a Japanese #1 hit from the single "&" by Ayumi Hamasaki. This mix was included on the album Ayu-mi-x 6: Gold. 
Starting in 2009, Matt Black, with musician/artist/coder Paul Miller (creator of the TX Modular Open Source synth), developed Granul8, a new type of visual fx/source Black termed a ‘granular video synthesiser’. Granul8 allows the use of realtime VJ techniques including video feedback combined with VDMX VJ software. 
From 2009 onwards, Black has been collaborating with coder and psychedelic mathematician William Rood to create a forthcoming project called Liveloom, a social media AV mixer. 
In 2010, Coldcut celebrated 20 years of releasing music with its label, Ninja Tune. A book entitled Ninja Tune: 20 Years of Beats and Pieces was released on 12 August 2010, and an exhibition was held at Black Dog Publishing's Black Dog Space in London, showcasing artwork, design and photography from the label's 20-year history. A compilation album was released on 20 September in two formats: a regular version consisting of two 2-disc volumes, and a limited edition which contained six CDs, six 7" vinyl singles, a hardback copy of the book, a poster and additional items. Ninja Tune also incorporated a series of international parties. This repositioned Ninja as a continually compelling and influential label, being one of the "longest-running (and successful) UK indie labels to come out of the late-1980s/early-90s explosion in dance music and hip-hop" (Pitchfork, 28 September 2010). Pitchfork claimed it had a "right to show off a little". 
In July 2013, Coldcut produced a piece entitled ‘D’autre’ based on the writings of French poet Arthur Rimbaud, for Forum Des Images in Paris.The following month, in August, Coldcut produced a new soundtrack for a section of André Sauvage’s classic film Études sur Paris, which was shown as part of Noise of Art at the BFI in London, which celebrated 100 years of Electronic Music and Silent Cinema. Coldcut put new music to films from the Russolo era, incorporating original recordings of Russolo's proto-synths. 
In April 2013, Coldcut released Ninja Jamm, an iOS music app, in collaboration with London-based technology crew Seeper. Initially, the app allowed users to purchase and remix ‘Tunepacks’ of original tracks by Coldcut and other Ninja artists. These packs became part of the Ninja Tune release schedule, often being released simultaneously with traditional formats. Ninja Jamm was featured on the New and Noteworthy section of the App Store on release, and has received over 300,000 downloads to date. 
The powerful, ‘intuitive yet deep,’ app allowed users significant scope to play with, edit and re-work Ninja releases. Coldcut used it in their DJ sets, constantly improving and updating it. 
In summer 2015, Ninja Jamm and Loopmasters launched ‘Samplepacks,’ containing genre specific samples and turning Ninja Jamm into a powerful, original music creation app. Users are now able to turn instruments on and off, swap between clips, add glitches and effects, trigger and pitch-bend stabs and one-off samples, and change the tempo of the track under touch control. Users can additionally record as they play and instantly share their jamms via Soundcloud, Facebook and other means. 
To date over 20 tunepacks have been released, including Amon Tobin, Bonobo, Coldcut, DJ Food, Lapalux, Machinedrum, Congo Natty, Irresistible Force, FaltyDL and many more, and in July 2015 it is planned to release the app on Android. 
In 2013, Coldcut began working on a new album, collaborating with producer Dave Taylor (a.k.a. Solid Groove a.k.a. Switch). As of Summer 2015, this latest chapter in their legendary catalogue is nearing completion. 
Ninja Tune turns 25 in 2015. Coldcut founded the label to release the future-gazing music that excited them, and to do so without boundaries, and based purely on its quality and originality. The label’s remit remains exactly that, a quarter of a century later. 
And Coldcut themselves are as irrepressible as ever. Lauded as the number 3 DJs of all time by Music Radar, in recent months they’ve contributed an original, interactive, cutup installation for one of their creative precursors, William Burroughs, at his ‘Animals in the Wall’ exhibition. 
Their long term relationship with Greenpeace continued with DJ sets for the organization at Glastonbury for the last two years. In the same vein, ‘Everything is Under Control’ was used for ‘The Revolution with be Televised,’ the BBS activist comedy show broadcast in 2013. Matt Black has found a natural calling giving talks and lectures at events and teaching establishments, his long-standing political activism finding itself in renewed demand in turbulent times. 
And coming soon will be a brand new studio album, which will see Coldcut back in the vanguard of electronic music, and collaborating with some of the best musical mavericks from around the world – a group they’ve long been counted amongst.
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Most people come into music, do the same thing for a few years, slowly sink back into obscurity and spend the rest of their life collecting publishing royalties and re-forming for tribute tours. Their biographies can afford to be quite short – most of us aren’t that interested in golf or angling. The problem with Coldcut is that, despite their veteran status, they act like two unruly children who just won’t sit still. Which is why even a brief trawl through their various activities looks like a large chapter of a big book. 
In 1986, computer programmer Matt Black and ex-art teacher Jonathan More were part-time DJs on the rare groove scene. More also DJed on pirate radio, hosting the Meltdown Show on Kiss FM and worked at the Reckless Records store on Berwick Street, London where Black visited as a customer. The first collaboration between the two artists was 'Say Kids What Time Is It?' on a white label in January 1987, which mixed Jungle Book's "King of the Swingers" with the break from James Brown's "Funky Drummer." The innovation of "Say Kids..." caused More and Black to be heralded by SPIN as "the first Brit artists to really get hip-hop’s class-cutup aesthetic". It’s regarded as the UK’s first breaks record, the first UK record to be built entirely of samples and "the final link in the chain connecting European collage-experiment with the dance-remix-scratch edit". This was later sampled in "Pump Up the Volume" by MARRS, a single that reached #1 in the UK in October 1987. 
Though Black had joined Kiss FM with his own mix-based show, the pair eventually joined forces with their own show, later in 1987, called Solid Steel. The eclectic show became a unifying force in underground experimental electronic music, and is still running to date, celebrating 25 years in 2013. 
The duo adopted the name Coldcut, and set up a record label called Ahead Of Our Time to release the single Beats + Pieces (one of the formats also included "That Greedy Beat") in 1987. All of these tracks were assembled using cassette pause button edits, and later spliced tape loops that would sometimes run "all over the room.” The duo used sampling from Led Zeppelin to James Brown. Electronic act The Chemical Brothers have described ‘Beats + Pieces’ as the ‘first bigbeat record’, a style which appeared in the mid-90s. 
Coldcut's first mainstream success came when Julian Palmer from Island Records asked them to remix Eric B. & Rakim's "Paid in Full". Released in October 1987, the landmark remix is said to have "laid the groundwork for hip hop’s entry into the UK mainstream", becoming a breakthrough hit for Eric B & Rakim outside the U.S., reaching #15 in the UK and the top 20 in a number of European countries. It featured a prominent Ofra Haza sample and many other vocal cut ups as well as a looped rhythm which later, when speeded up, proved popular in the Breakbeat genre. Off the back of its success in clubs, the Coldcut "Seven Minutes of Madness" remix ended up being promoted as the single in the UK. 
In 1988, More and Black formed Hex, a self-titled "multimedia pop group," with Mile Visman and Rob Pepperell. While working on videos for artists such as Kevin Saunderson, Queen Latifah and Spiritualized, Hex’s collaborative work went on to incorporate 3D modelling, punk video art, and algorithmic visuals on desktop machines. The video for Coldcut’s ‘Christmas Break’ in 1989 is arguably one of the first pop promos produced entirely on microcomputers. 
In 1988, Coldcut released ‘Out To Lunch With Ahead Of Our Time,’ a double LP of Coldcut productions and re-cuts, and the various aliases under which the duo had recorded. This continued the duo’s tradition of releasing limited availability vinyl. 
The next Coldcut single, released in February 1988, moved towards a more house-influenced style. "Doctorin' the House", which debuted singer Yazz, became a top ten hit, and peaked at #6. In the same year, under the guise Yazz and the Plastic Population, they produced "The Only Way Is Up", a cover of a Northern Soul song. The record reached #1 in the UK in August, and remained there for five weeks, becoming 1988’s second biggest selling single. Producer Youth of Killing Joke also helped Coldcut with this record. The duo had another top hit in September with "Stop This Crazy Thing", which featured reggae vocalist Junior Reid and reached number 21 in the UK. 
The single "People Hold On" became another UK Top 20 hit. Released in March 1989, it helped launch the career of the then relatively unknown singer Lisa Stansfield. Coldcut and Mark Saunders produced her debut solo single "This Is the Right Time", which became another UK Top 20 hit in August as well as reaching #21 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 the following year. 
As the duo started to enjoy critical and commercial success, their debut album What's That Noise? was released in April 1989 on Ahead of Our Time and distributed by Big Life Records. The album gave "breaks the full length treatment", and showcased "their heady blend of hip-hop production aesthetics and proto-acid house grooves". It also rounded up a heap of unconventional guest features, quoted by SPIN as having "somehow found room at the same table for Queen Latifah and Mark E. Smith". The album’s track ‘I’m in Deep’ (featuring Smith) prefigured the Indie-dance guitar-breaks crossover of such bands as the Stone Roses and Happy Mondays, utilizing Smith’s freestyle raucous vocals over an acid house backing, and also including psych guitar samples from British rock band Deep Purple. What’s That Noise? reached the Top 20 in the UK and was certified Silver. 
Coldcut's second album, Some Like It Cold released in 1990 on Ahead Of Our Time, featured a collaboration with Queen Latifah on the single "Find a Way". Though "Find a Way" was a minor hit in the UK, no more singles were released from the album. The duo was given the BPI "Producer of the Year Award" in 1990. Hex - alongside some other London visual experimenters such as iE - produced a series of videos for a longform VHS version of the album. This continued Coldcut and Hex’s pioneering of the use of microcomputers to synthesize electronic music visuals. 
After their success with Lisa Stansfield, Coldcut signed with her label, Arista. Conflicts arose with the major label, as Coldcut’s "vision extended beyond the formulae of house and techno" and mainstream pop culture. Eventually, the duo’s album Philosophy emerged in 1993. Singles "Dreamer" and "Autumn Leaves" (1994) were both minor hits but the album did not chart. 
"Autumn Leaves" had strings recorded at Abbey Road, with a 30 piece string section and an arrangement by film composer Ed Shearmur. The leader of the string section was Simon Jeffes of Penguin Cafe Orchestra. Coldcut’s insistence on their friend Mixmaster Morris to remix "Autumn Leaves" led to one of Morris’ most celebrated remixes, which became a minor legend in ambient music. It has appeared on numerous compilations. 
In 1990, whilst on their first tour in Japan (which also featured Norman Cook, who later became Fatboy Slim), Matt and Jon formed their second record label, Ninja Tune, as a self-titled ’technocoloured escape pod,’ and a way to escape the creative control of major labels. The label enabled them to release music under different aliases (e.g.. Bogus Order, DJ Food), which also helped them to avoid pigeonholing as producers. Ninja Tune’s first release was Bogus Order’s ‘Zen Brakes.’ The name Coldcut stayed with Arista, so there were no official Coldcut releases for the next three years. 
During this time, Coldcut still produced for artists on their new label, releasing a flood of material under different names and continuing to work with young groups. They additionally kept on with Solid Steel on Kiss FM and running the night club Stealth (Club of the Year in the NME, The Face, and Mixmag in 1996). 
In 1991, Hex released their first video game, ‘Top Banana’, which was included on a Hex release for the Commodore CDTV machine in 1992, arguably the first complete purpose-designed multimedia system. ‘Top Banana’ was innovative in that it used sampled graphics, contained an ecological theme and a female lead character (dubbed ‘KT’), and its music changed through random processes. Coldcut and Hex presented this multimedia project as an example of the forthcoming convergence of pop music and computer game characters. 
In 1992, Hex’s first single - ‘Global Chaos’ / ‘Digital Love Opus 1’ - combined rave visuals with techno and ambient interactive visuals.[32] In November of that year, Hex released Global Chaos CDTV, which took advantage of the possibilities of the new CD-ROM medium. The Global Chaos CDTV disk (which contained the ‘Top Banana’ game, interactive visuals and audio), was a forerunner of the "CD+" concept, uniting music, graphics, and video games into one. This multi-dimensional entertainment product received wide coverage in the national media, including features on Dance Energy, Kaleidoscope on BBC Radio 4, What's Up Doc? on ITV and Reportage on BBC 2. i-D Magazine was quoted as saying, "It's like your TV tripping". 
Coldcut videos were made for most songs, often by Hexstatic, and used a lot of stock and sampled footage. Their ‘Timber’ video, which created an AV collage piece using analogous techniques to audio sample collage, was put on heavy rotation on MTV. Stuart Warren Hill of Hexstatic referred to this technique as: "What you see is what you hear." ‘Timber’ (which appears on both ‘Let Us Play’, Coldcut’s fourth album, and ‘Let Us Replay,’ their fifth) won awards for its innovative use of repetitive video clips synced to the music, including being shortlisted at the Edinburgh Television and Film Festival in their top five music videos of the year in 1998. 
Coldcut began integrating video sampling into their live DJ gigs at the time, and incorporated multimedia content that caused press to credit the act as segueing "into the computer age". Throughout the 90s, Hex created visuals for Coldcut’s live performances, and developed the CD-ROM portion of Coldcut’s ‘Let Us Play’ and ‘Let Us Replay,’ in addition to software developed specifically for the album’s world tour. Hex’s inclusion of music videos and ‘playtools’ (playful art/music software programs) on Coldcut’s CD-Roms was completely ahead of the curve at that time, offering viewers/listeners a high level of interactivity. Playtools such as My Little Funkit and Playtime were the prototypes for Ninja Jamm, the app Coldcut designed and launched 16 years later. Playtime followed on from Coldcut and Hex’s Synopticon installation, developing the auto-cutup algorhythm, and using other random processes to generate surprising combinations. Coldcut and Hex performed live using Playtime at the 1st Sonar Festival in 1994. Playtime was also used to generate the backing track for Coldcut’s collaboration with Jello Biafra, ‘Every Home a Prison’. 
In 1994 Coldcut and Hex contributed an installation to the Glasgow Gallery of Modern Art. The piece, called 'Generator' was installed in the Fire Gallery. Generator was an interactive installation which allowed users to mix sound, video, text and graphics and make their own audio-visual mix, modelled on the techniques and technology used by Coldcut in clubs and live performance events. It consisted of two consoles: the left controlling how the sounds are played, the right controlling how the images are played. 
As part of the JAM exhibition of "Style, Music and Media" at the Barbican Art Gallery in 1996, Coldcut and Hex were commissioned to produce an interactive audiovisual piece called Synopticon. Conceived and designed by Robert Pepperell and Matt Black, the digital culture synthesiser allows users to "remix" sounds, images, text and music in a partially random, partially controlled way. 
The year 1996 also brought the Coldcut name back to More and Black, and the pair celebrated with ‘70 Minutes of Madness,’ a mix CD that became part of the Journeys by DJ series. The release was credited with "bringing to wider attention the sort of freestyle mixing the pair were always known for through their radio show on KISS FM, Solid Steel, and their steady club dates". It was voted "Best Compilation of All Time" by Jockey Slut in 1998. 
In February 1997, they released a double pack single "Atomic Moog 2000" / "Boot the System", the first Coldcut release on Ninja Tune. This was not eligible for the UK chart because time and format restrictions prevented the inclusion of the ‘Natural Rhythm’ video on the CD. In August 1997, a reworking of the early track "More Beats + Pieces" gave them their first UK Top 40 hit since 1989. 
The album Let Us Play! followed in September and also made the Top 40. The fourth album by Coldcut, Let Us Play! paid homage to the greats that inspired them. Their first album to be released on Ninja Tune, it featured guest appearances by Grandmaster Flash, Steinski, Jello Biafra, Jimpster, The Herbaliser, Talvin Singh, Daniel Pemberton and Selena Saliva. Coldcut’s cut 'n' paste method on the album was compared to that of Dadaism and William Burroughs. Hex collaborated with Coldcut to produce the multimedia CD-Rom for the album. Hex later evolved the software into the engine that was used on the Let Us Play! world tour. 
In 1997, Matt Black - alongside Cambridge based developers Camart - created real-time video manipulation software VJamm. It allowed users to be a "digital video jockey,", remixing and collaging sound and images and trigger audio and visual samples simultaneously, subsequently bringing futuristic technology to the audio-visual field. VJamm rivalled some of the features of high-end and high cost tech at the time. The VJamm technology, praised as being proof of how far computers changed the face of live music, became seminal in both Coldcut's live sets (which were called a "revelaton" by Melody Maker and DJ sets. Their CCTV live show was featured at major festivals including Glastonbury, Roskilde, Sónar, the Montreux Jazz Festival, and John Peel's Meltdown. The "beautifully simple and devastatingly effective" software was deemed revolutionary, and became recognized as a major factor in the evolution of clubs. It eventually earned a place in the American Museum of the Moving Image's permanent collection. As quoted by The Independent: "Coldcut's motto? 'Don't hate the media, be the media." NME was quoted as saying: "Veteran duo Coldcut are so cool they invented the remix - now they are doing the same for television." 
Also working with Camart, Black designed DJamm software in 1998, which Coldcut used on laptops for their live shows, providing the audio bed alongside VJamm’s audiovisual samples. Matt Black explained they designed DJamm so they "could perform electronic music in a different way – i.e., not just taking a session band out to reproduce what you put together in the studio using samples. It had a relationship to DJing, but was more interactive and more effective." Excitingly at that time, DJamm was pioneering in its ability to shuffle sliced loops into intricate sequences, enabling users to split loops into any number of parts. 
In 1999, Let Us Replay! was released, a double-disc remix album where Coldcut’s classic tunes were remixed by the likes of Cornelius (which was heralded as a highlight of the album, Irresistible Force, Shut Up And Dance, Carl Craig and J Swinscoe. Let Us Replay! pieces together "short sharp shocks that put the mental in ‘experimental’ and still bring the breaks till the breakadawn". It also includes a few live tracks from the duo’s innovative world tour. The CD-Rom of the album, which also contained a free demo disc of the VJamm software, was one of the earliest audiovisual CD- ROMs on the market, and Muzik claimed deserved to "have them canonized...it’s like buying an entire mini studio for under $15." 
In 2000, the Solid Steel show moved to BBC London. 
Coldcut continued to forge interesting collaborations, including 2001's "Revolution," an EP in which Coldcut created their own political party (The Guilty Party). Featuring scratches and samples of Tony Blair and William Hague speeches, the 3-track EP included Nautilus' "Space Journey," which won an Intermusic contest in 2000. The video was widely played on MTV. With ‘Space Journey,’ Coldcut were arguably the first group to give fans access to the multitrack parts, or "stems," of their songs, building on the idea of interactivity and sharing from Let Us Play. 
In 2001, Coldcut produced tracks for the Sega music video game REZ. REZ replaced typical video game sound effect with electronic music; the player created sounds and melodies, intended to simulate a form of synesthesia. The soundtrack also featured Adam Freeland and Oval. 
In 2002, while utilizing VJamm and Detraktor, Coldcut and Juxta remixed Herbie Hancock’s classic ‘Rockit,’ creating both an audio and video remix. 
Working with Marcus Clements in 2002, Coldcut released the sample manipulation algorhythm from their DJamm software as a standalone VST plugin that could be used in other software, naming it the Coldcutter. 
Also in 2002, Coldcut with UK VJs Headspace (now mainly performing as the VJamm Allstars developed Gridio, an interactive, immersive audio-visual installation for the Pompidou Centre as part of the ‘Sonic Process’ exhibition. The ‘Sonic Process’ exhibition was launched at the MACBA in Barcelona in conjunction with Sónar, featuring Gridio as its centerpiece. In 2003, a commission for Graz led to a specially built version of Gridio, in a cave inside the castle mountain in Austria. Gridio was later commissioned by O2 for two simultaneous customised installations at the O2 Wireless Festivals in Leeds and London in 2007. That same year, Gridio was featured as part of Optronica at the opening week of the new BFI Southbank development in London. 
In 2003, Black worked with Penny Rimbaud (ex Crass) on Crass Agenda's Savage Utopia project. Black performed the piece with Rimbaud, Eve Libertine and other players at London’s Vortex Jazz Club. 
In 2004, Coldcut collaborated with American video mashup artist TV Sheriff to produce their cut-up entitled ‘Revolution USA.’ The tactical-media project (coordinated with Canadian art duo NomIg) followed on from the UK version and extended the premise "into an open access participatory project". Through the multimedia political art project, over 12 gigabytes of footage from the last 40 years of US politics were made accessible to download, allowing participants to create a cut-up over a Coldcut beat. Coldcut also collaborated with TV Sheriff and NomIg to produce two audiovisual pieces "World of Evil" (2004) and "Revolution '08" (2008), both composed of footage from the United States presidential elections of respective years. The music used was composed by Coldcut, with "Revolution '08" featuring a remix by the Qemists. 
Later that year, a collaboration with the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) led to the psychedelic art documentary 'Wavejammer.’ Coldcut was given access to the BAS archive in order to create sounds and visuals for the short film. 
2004 also saw Coldcut produce a radio play in conjunction with renowned young author Hari Kunzru for BBC Radio 3 (incidentally called 'Sound Mirrors'). 
Coldcut returned with the single "Everything Is Under Control” at the end of 2005, featuring Jon Spencer (of Jon Spencer Blues Explosion) and Mike Ladd. It was followed in 2006 by their fifth studio album Sound Mirrors, which was quoted as being “one of the most vital and imaginative records Jon Moore and Matt Black have ever made”, and saw the duo "continue, impressively, to find new ways to present political statements through a gamut of pristine electronics and breakbeats" (CITATION: Future Music, 2007). The fascinating array of guest vocalists included Soweto Kinch, Annette Peacock, Ameri Baraka, and Saul Williams. The latter followed on from Coldcut’s remix of Williams’ ‘The Pledge’ for a project with DJ Spooky. 
A 100-date audiovisual world tour commenced for ‘Sound Mirrors,’ which was considered "no small feat in terms of technology or human effort". Coldcut was accompanied by scratch DJ Raj and AV artist Juxta, in addition to guest vocalists from the album, including UK rapper Juice Aleem, Roots Manuva, Mpho Skeef, Jon Spencer and house legend Robert Owens. 
Three further singles were released from the album including the Top 75 hit "True Skool" with Roots Manuva. The same track appeared on the soundtrack of the video game FIFA Street 2. 
Sponsored by the British Council, in 2005 Coldcut introduced AV mixing to India with the Union project, alongside collaborators Howie B and Aki Nawaz of Fun-Da-Mental. Coldcut created an A/V remix of the Bollywood hit movie ‘Kal Ho Naa Ho’. 
In 2006, Coldcut performed an A/V set based on "Music for 18 Musicians" as part of Steve Reich’s 70th birthday gig at the Barbican Centre in London. 
Coldcut remixed another classic song in 2007: Nina Simone’s ‘Save Me.’ This was part of a remix album called ‘Nina Simone: Remixed & Re-imagined,’ featuring remixes from Tony Humphries, Francois K and Chris Coco. 
In February 2007, Coldcut and Mixmaster Morris created a psychedelic AV obituary/tribute Coldcut, Mixmaster Morris, Ken Campbell, Bill Drummond and Alan Moore (18 March 2007). Robert Anton Wilson tribute show. Queen Elizabeth Hall, London: Mixmaster Morris. (28 August 2009) to Robert Anton Wilson, the 60s author of Illuminatus! Trilogy. The tribute featured graphic novel writer Alan Moore and artist Bill Drummond and a performance by experimental theatre legend Ken Campbell. Coldcut and Morris’ hour and a half performance resembled a documentary being remixed on the fly, cutting up nearly 15 hours’ worth of Wilson’s lectures. 
In 2008, an international group of party organisers, activists and artists including Coldcut received a grant from the Intelligent Energy Department of the European Union, to create a project that promoted intelligent energy and environmental awareness to the youth of Europe. The result was Energy Union, a piece of VJ cinema, political campaign, music tour, party, art exhibition and social media hub. Energy Union toured 12 EU countries throughout 2009 and 2010, completing 24 events in total. Coldcut created the Energy Union show for the tour, a one-hour Audio/Visual montage on the theme of Intelligent Energy. In presenting new ideas for climate, environmental and energy communication strategies, the Energy Union tour was well received, and reached a widespread audience in cities across the UK, Germany, Belgium, The Netherlands, Croatia, Slovenia, Austria, Hungary, Bulgaria, Spain and the Czech Republic. 
Also in 2008, Coldcut was asked to remix the theme song for British cult TV show Doctor Who for the program’s 40th anniversary. In October 2008, Coldcut celebrated the legacy of the BBC Radiophonic Workshop (the place where the Doctor Who theme was created) with a live DJ mix at London’s legendary Roundhouse. The live mix incorporated classic Radiophonic Workshop compositions with extended sampling of the original gear. 
Additionally in 2008, Coldcut remixed "Ourselves", a Japanese #1 hit from the single "&" by Ayumi Hamasaki. This mix was included on the album Ayu-mi-x 6: Gold. 
Starting in 2009, Matt Black, with musician/artist/coder Paul Miller (creator of the TX Modular Open Source synth), developed Granul8, a new type of visual fx/source Black termed a ‘granular video synthesiser’. Granul8 allows the use of realtime VJ techniques including video feedback combined with VDMX VJ software. 
From 2009 onwards, Black has been collaborating with coder and psychedelic mathematician William Rood to create a forthcoming project called Liveloom, a social media AV mixer. 
In 2010, Coldcut celebrated 20 years of releasing music with its label, Ninja Tune. A book entitled Ninja Tune: 20 Years of Beats and Pieces was released on 12 August 2010, and an exhibition was held at Black Dog Publishing's Black Dog Space in London, showcasing artwork, design and photography from the label's 20-year history. A compilation album was released on 20 September in two formats: a regular version consisting of two 2-disc volumes, and a limited edition which contained six CDs, six 7" vinyl singles, a hardback copy of the book, a poster and additional items. Ninja Tune also incorporated a series of international parties. This repositioned Ninja as a continually compelling and influential label, being one of the "longest-running (and successful) UK indie labels to come out of the late-1980s/early-90s explosion in dance music and hip-hop" (Pitchfork, 28 September 2010). Pitchfork claimed it had a "right to show off a little". 
In July 2013, Coldcut produced a piece entitled ‘D’autre’ based on the writings of French poet Arthur Rimbaud, for Forum Des Images in Paris.The following month, in August, Coldcut produced a new soundtrack for a section of André Sauvage’s classic film Études sur Paris, which was shown as part of Noise of Art at the BFI in London, which celebrated 100 years of Electronic Music and Silent Cinema. Coldcut put new music to films from the Russolo era, incorporating original recordings of Russolo's proto-synths. 
In April 2013, Coldcut released Ninja Jamm, an iOS music app, in collaboration with London-based technology crew Seeper. Initially, the app allowed users to purchase and remix ‘Tunepacks’ of original tracks by Coldcut and other Ninja artists. These packs became part of the Ninja Tune release schedule, often being released simultaneously with traditional formats. Ninja Jamm was featured on the New and Noteworthy section of the App Store on release, and has received over 300,000 downloads to date. 
The powerful, ‘intuitive yet deep,’ app allowed users significant scope to play with, edit and re-work Ninja releases. Coldcut used it in their DJ sets, constantly improving and updating it. 
In summer 2015, Ninja Jamm and Loopmasters launched ‘Samplepacks,’ containing genre specific samples and turning Ninja Jamm into a powerful, original music creation app. Users are now able to turn instruments on and off, swap between clips, add glitches and effects, trigger and pitch-bend stabs and one-off samples, and change the tempo of the track under touch control. Users can additionally record as they play and instantly share their jamms via Soundcloud, Facebook and other means. 
To date over 20 tunepacks have been released, including Amon Tobin, Bonobo, Coldcut, DJ Food, Lapalux, Machinedrum, Congo Natty, Irresistible Force, FaltyDL and many more, and in July 2015 it is planned to release the app on Android. 
In 2013, Coldcut began working on a new album, collaborating with producer Dave Taylor (a.k.a. Solid Groove a.k.a. Switch). As of Summer 2015, this latest chapter in their legendary catalogue is nearing completion. 
Ninja Tune turns 25 in 2015. Coldcut founded the label to release the future-gazing music that excited them, and to do so without boundaries, and based purely on its quality and originality. The label’s remit remains exactly that, a quarter of a century later. 
And Coldcut themselves are as irrepressible as ever. Lauded as the number 3 DJs of all time by Music Radar, in recent months they’ve contributed an original, interactive, cutup installation for one of their creative precursors, William Burroughs, at his ‘Animals in the Wall’ exhibition. 
Their long term relationship with Greenpeace continued with DJ sets for the organization at Glastonbury for the last two years. In the same vein, ‘Everything is Under Control’ was used for ‘The Revolution with be Televised,’ the BBS activist comedy show broadcast in 2013. Matt Black has found a natural calling giving talks and lectures at events and teaching establishments, his long-standing political activism finding itself in renewed demand in turbulent times. 
And coming soon will be a brand new studio album, which will see Coldcut back in the vanguard of electronic music, and collaborating with some of the best musical mavericks from around the world – a group they’ve long been counted amongst.
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AFTERPARTY: RONE + JIMMY EDGAR + MACHINEDRUM

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AFTERPARTY: RONE + JIMMY EDGAR + MACHINEDRUM

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North Carolina-born artist Travis Stewart known as Machinedrum has produced and composed over a dozen albums under various aliases since his first independent release in 1999. Covering an astonishing variety of styles with ease, through solo Machinedrum work and with collaborative projects Sepalcure, JETS, Dream Continuum, or other mutations, Stewart has established himself as electronic music's true Renaissance man.

His debut as Machinedrum Now You Know, was released in 2001 on pioneering Miami-based Merck Records and gained worldwide attention and praise from musicians, fans and critics. Having a strong background in both acoustic and electronic instrumentation, he was quickly able to navigate those various elements on his early releases from field recording and vintage synth laden Urban Biology to his seminal production and mixing of This Charming Mixtape with MC Theophilus London and his critically acclaimed 2009 album Want To 1 2? 2010's Many Faces EP ushered the next phase of Machinedrum's career and a fruitful relationship with Glasgow-based label LuckyMe. Sepalcure, a duo launched with Praveen Sharma shortly after, became one of the most intriguing names in the bass music scene and a series of releases on bubbling imprint Hotflush has given the duo NYC ambassadorship of this UK-based genre.

Relocating to Berlin for a few years, Machinedrum maintained a steady flow of releases including the Alarmaa and SXLND EPs with LuckyMe and the critically-acclaimed Room(s) LP on Planet Mu Records, a fresh new exploration of juke, jungle, and drum&bass that garnered high praise across the music world.

The dance floor blitzkrieg JETS, his latest project with longtime collaborator Jimmy Edgar has kept him ahead of the curve once again, serving as yet another showcase for his musical evolution.

His biggest and boldest release came last year in the form of the full-length LP Vapor City on famed label Ninja Tune, a conceptual universe which included an interactive website, digital citizenship program for fans, and an art exhibit in NYC that launched with the album. With subsequent EPs, exclusive remixes from a series of heavyweights, and a critically-acclaimed world tour, Vapor City carried on his rich exploration of multimedia arts and music.

Delivering his signature on every thing he touches, through each solo album and EP, collaborations, or production work for the likes of Azealia Banks, Jamie Liddell, Jesse Boykins III and others, Machinedrum is now widely recognized as a producer's producer, a pioneer of many styles, and a master of his craft.

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North Carolina-born artist Travis Stewart known as Machinedrum has produced and composed over a dozen albums under various aliases since his first independent release in 1999. Covering an astonishing variety of styles with ease, through solo Machinedrum work and with collaborative projects Sepalcure, JETS, Dream Continuum, or other mutations, Stewart has established himself as electronic music's true Renaissance man.

His debut as Machinedrum Now You Know, was released in 2001 on pioneering Miami-based Merck Records and gained worldwide attention and praise from musicians, fans and critics. Having a strong background in both acoustic and electronic instrumentation, he was quickly able to navigate those various elements on his early releases from field recording and vintage synth laden Urban Biology to his seminal production and mixing of This Charming Mixtape with MC Theophilus London and his critically acclaimed 2009 album Want To 1 2? 2010's Many Faces EP ushered the next phase of Machinedrum's career and a fruitful relationship with Glasgow-based label LuckyMe. Sepalcure, a duo launched with Praveen Sharma shortly after, became one of the most intriguing names in the bass music scene and a series of releases on bubbling imprint Hotflush has given the duo NYC ambassadorship of this UK-based genre.

Relocating to Berlin for a few years, Machinedrum maintained a steady flow of releases including the Alarmaa and SXLND EPs with LuckyMe and the critically-acclaimed Room(s) LP on Planet Mu Records, a fresh new exploration of juke, jungle, and drum&bass that garnered high praise across the music world.

The dance floor blitzkrieg JETS, his latest project with longtime collaborator Jimmy Edgar has kept him ahead of the curve once again, serving as yet another showcase for his musical evolution.

His biggest and boldest release came last year in the form of the full-length LP Vapor City on famed label Ninja Tune, a conceptual universe which included an interactive website, digital citizenship program for fans, and an art exhibit in NYC that launched with the album. With subsequent EPs, exclusive remixes from a series of heavyweights, and a critically-acclaimed world tour, Vapor City carried on his rich exploration of multimedia arts and music.

Delivering his signature on every thing he touches, through each solo album and EP, collaborations, or production work for the likes of Azealia Banks, Jamie Liddell, Jesse Boykins III and others, Machinedrum is now widely recognized as a producer's producer, a pioneer of many styles, and a master of his craft.

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Lukid is a producer from London who makes all manner of electronic music depending on what kind of mood he’s in. Sometimes it’s quite fast and angular, other times it’s warm and blurry like summer rain. He has previously released two albums on Actress’ Werkdiscs label - Onandon (2007) and Foma (2009) - and with new album Lonely At The Top, he’ll make that three on 22 October 2012.

The lighting bolt for Lonely At The Top came in the form of a bag of home-taped cassettes he found on his street a year and a half ago. Among the haul were classical recordings, a few language tapes and one marked DISCO. Having just started playing around with recording stuff to tape with an old hi-fi, this was one of those funny little coincidences that some would call fate. “Tape has a way of making things sound sad,” he recalls. Listening to those tapes set the wheels in motion for "Bless My Heart". A low, slow funk track, it set the tone for the album: a little spooked but shot through with hope.

It was made using an old Dell laptop, a Macbook, a couple of synths and a tape machine. Claiming to know “nothing about the technical side” of things, Lonely At The Top is the first record Lukid has made without any creeping worries about professionalism. “I just thought, if it sounds good then that’s all that matters,” he continues. “I would record things back and forth and mess with the same sound so many times that by the end it was a complete mess and totally distorted.”

That sense of freedom runs through the album. Its arc is geographical, tracing landscapes, stirring up buried memories and giving shape to ideas of places. “I like albums that are put together like a film,” he says. “So it has ups and downs and keeps you guessing.” The foggy, faintly industrial plains of "Manchester" provide the backdrop to the titular sample which was picked out from a Japanese language tape. "Snow Theme" paints a soft white-out scene, with the rush of calm that chases it. Like a gentle call to stir slumbering workers to their posts, "USSR" has both a familiarity and warm regretfulness to it that stings and yet was named after a level in Street Fighter II.

Perhaps that’s the most moving thing about Lonely At The Top: the tension between the playful titling and its teasing presentation of this mournful music. In listening, there is an intimate sense of closeness, a feeling that situates the heart in the throat. And yet there is that tongue-in-cheek title, chosen because it made Lukid laugh: “It clearly doesn’t apply to me.” But then sometimes funny is the saddest thing of all.

Lonely At The Top is a deeply moving, absorbing album, and without a doubt Lukid’s finest work to date.

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www.werkdiscs.com

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Lukid is a producer from London who makes all manner of electronic music depending on what kind of mood he’s in. Sometimes it’s quite fast and angular, other times it’s warm and blurry like summer rain. He has previously released two albums on Actress’ Werkdiscs label - Onandon (2007) and Foma (2009) - and with new album Lonely At The Top, he’ll make that three on 22 October 2012.

The lighting bolt for Lonely At The Top came in the form of a bag of home-taped cassettes he found on his street a year and a half ago. Among the haul were classical recordings, a few language tapes and one marked DISCO. Having just started playing around with recording stuff to tape with an old hi-fi, this was one of those funny little coincidences that some would call fate. “Tape has a way of making things sound sad,” he recalls. Listening to those tapes set the wheels in motion for "Bless My Heart". A low, slow funk track, it set the tone for the album: a little spooked but shot through with hope.

It was made using an old Dell laptop, a Macbook, a couple of synths and a tape machine. Claiming to know “nothing about the technical side” of things, Lonely At The Top is the first record Lukid has made without any creeping worries about professionalism. “I just thought, if it sounds good then that’s all that matters,” he continues. “I would record things back and forth and mess with the same sound so many times that by the end it was a complete mess and totally distorted.”

That sense of freedom runs through the album. Its arc is geographical, tracing landscapes, stirring up buried memories and giving shape to ideas of places. “I like albums that are put together like a film,” he says. “So it has ups and downs and keeps you guessing.” The foggy, faintly industrial plains of "Manchester" provide the backdrop to the titular sample which was picked out from a Japanese language tape. "Snow Theme" paints a soft white-out scene, with the rush of calm that chases it. Like a gentle call to stir slumbering workers to their posts, "USSR" has both a familiarity and warm regretfulness to it that stings and yet was named after a level in Street Fighter II.

Perhaps that’s the most moving thing about Lonely At The Top: the tension between the playful titling and its teasing presentation of this mournful music. In listening, there is an intimate sense of closeness, a feeling that situates the heart in the throat. And yet there is that tongue-in-cheek title, chosen because it made Lukid laugh: “It clearly doesn’t apply to me.” But then sometimes funny is the saddest thing of all.

Lonely At The Top is a deeply moving, absorbing album, and without a doubt Lukid’s finest work to date.

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www.werkdiscs.com

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DJ Food (present) : Strictly Kev

With nearly 25 years of DJing experience and more than a decade serving up Food for DJs, for both Ninja and Coldcut's weekly radio show 'Solid Steel', Kev is now in the Food hot seat.

At his 'Telepathic Fish' ambient parties in the early 90's he booked Matt Black on his first VJing gigs, started designing artwork for Ninja Tune and paired up with PC (Patrick Carpenter) to form the public 'face' of DJ Food on 4 decks in clubs around the world. After working on various Food and Coldcut related studio projects with PC (A Recipe for Disaster, Journeys by DJ, ColdKrushCuts and the Blech mix compilations for Warp) they released the album 'Kaleidoscope' in 2000, closely followed by the 'Quadraplex EP' in 2001.

Also arriving in 2001 was the first in a series of Solid Steel mix CDs, starting with DJ Food & DK (Darren Knott - Solid Steel's producer) and the publicly lauded 'Now, Listen'. Since then he's been constantly art directing the Ninja label, designing for artists like Amon Tobin, The Herbaliser, DJ Vadim and Funki Porcini. Mix work has included a re-score of the Monkees' cult film 'Head', an as-yet-unreleased album of vintage Sesame Street funk, and his magnum opus 'Raiding the 20th Century'. This last hour long mix / documentary was an internet only release, charting the history of the cut-up and featured journalist Paul Morley reading from his book 'Words & Music'. Not only did it crash servers on several sites that hosted it due to its initial popularity but it was later subject to a cease & desist order from EMI for multiple infringements of copyright.

In 2007, alongside DK again, he followed up their Solid Steel debut with the sequel - 'Now, Listen Again', and the pair spent much of 2008 transferring their mix into a 4 deck audio visual live show. Using Serato's video plug-in - that enables video to be mixed and scratched via turntables the same as records - they christened their efforts 'video turntablism'.

Kev is now working on a series of EPs that will make up the next DJ Food album, an exhaustive DJ Food website (www.djfood.org) and providing artwork for Ninja artists such as King Cannibal and the 20th anniversary label celebrations.

DJ Food (past):

DJ Food has been many persons, of who we will come to in a moment. DJ Food is best described as Food for DJs, simple as that, just flip it around and it begins to mean something entirely different.

Originally produced by Coldcut the DJ Food project started in 1990 with the release of 'Jazz Brakes', with 'Jazz Brakes Volume 3' being the label's most successful early album. Not only are they effective collections of breaks, loops and samples ideal for mixing, remixing and producing - but also fine collections of funky jazz & hip hop tunes, that cut it just as well on the discerning dancefloor as in the safety of your own home...

Since the growth of the abstract hip hop scene in recent years the 'Jazz Brakes' albums have proved to be ahead of their time. The latter DJ Food albums have developed with shades of latin, dub, techno, ambient, tribal, african and jungle flavouring the funk. The 2005 album 'A Recipe For Disaster' was a conscious break from the five 'Jazz Brakes' volumes to form more of an identity as an artist, and a remix album of tracks from all 6 LPs 'Refried Food' was released Feb '95.

But who made this food? Matt Black & Jonathan More (aka Coldcut) were responsible for starting the DJ Food series of 'Jazz Brakes' back in the early 90's, and along the way they met Patrick Carpenter (PC) who was commonly misconstrued as the computer that they made the tracks on for a while. A loose collaborative team began to form as more like-minded people arrived at the party; Paul Brook, Paul Rabiger, Strictly Kev and Issac Elliston to name a few.

Whilst keeping their hand in as DJs, Matt & Jon couldn't and didn't want to DJ twice in one night under both aliases of Coldcut & DJ Food, so PC & Strictly stepped up to represent the Food club-wise. This was the score for some time, until PC became so busy with his involvement in the Cinematic Orchestra that he decided to depart to concentrate on that, leaving Strictly Kev to carry the mantle.

[links] =>

www.djfood.org

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DJ Food (present) : Strictly Kev

With nearly 25 years of DJing experience and more than a decade serving up Food for DJs, for both Ninja and Coldcut's weekly radio show 'Solid Steel', Kev is now in the Food hot seat.

At his 'Telepathic Fish' ambient parties in the early 90's he booked Matt Black on his first VJing gigs, started designing artwork for Ninja Tune and paired up with PC (Patrick Carpenter) to form the public 'face' of DJ Food on 4 decks in clubs around the world. After working on various Food and Coldcut related studio projects with PC (A Recipe for Disaster, Journeys by DJ, ColdKrushCuts and the Blech mix compilations for Warp) they released the album 'Kaleidoscope' in 2000, closely followed by the 'Quadraplex EP' in 2001.

Also arriving in 2001 was the first in a series of Solid Steel mix CDs, starting with DJ Food & DK (Darren Knott - Solid Steel's producer) and the publicly lauded 'Now, Listen'. Since then he's been constantly art directing the Ninja label, designing for artists like Amon Tobin, The Herbaliser, DJ Vadim and Funki Porcini. Mix work has included a re-score of the Monkees' cult film 'Head', an as-yet-unreleased album of vintage Sesame Street funk, and his magnum opus 'Raiding the 20th Century'. This last hour long mix / documentary was an internet only release, charting the history of the cut-up and featured journalist Paul Morley reading from his book 'Words & Music'. Not only did it crash servers on several sites that hosted it due to its initial popularity but it was later subject to a cease & desist order from EMI for multiple infringements of copyright.

In 2007, alongside DK again, he followed up their Solid Steel debut with the sequel - 'Now, Listen Again', and the pair spent much of 2008 transferring their mix into a 4 deck audio visual live show. Using Serato's video plug-in - that enables video to be mixed and scratched via turntables the same as records - they christened their efforts 'video turntablism'.

Kev is now working on a series of EPs that will make up the next DJ Food album, an exhaustive DJ Food website (www.djfood.org) and providing artwork for Ninja artists such as King Cannibal and the 20th anniversary label celebrations.

DJ Food (past):

DJ Food has been many persons, of who we will come to in a moment. DJ Food is best described as Food for DJs, simple as that, just flip it around and it begins to mean something entirely different.

Originally produced by Coldcut the DJ Food project started in 1990 with the release of 'Jazz Brakes', with 'Jazz Brakes Volume 3' being the label's most successful early album. Not only are they effective collections of breaks, loops and samples ideal for mixing, remixing and producing - but also fine collections of funky jazz & hip hop tunes, that cut it just as well on the discerning dancefloor as in the safety of your own home...

Since the growth of the abstract hip hop scene in recent years the 'Jazz Brakes' albums have proved to be ahead of their time. The latter DJ Food albums have developed with shades of latin, dub, techno, ambient, tribal, african and jungle flavouring the funk. The 2005 album 'A Recipe For Disaster' was a conscious break from the five 'Jazz Brakes' volumes to form more of an identity as an artist, and a remix album of tracks from all 6 LPs 'Refried Food' was released Feb '95.

But who made this food? Matt Black & Jonathan More (aka Coldcut) were responsible for starting the DJ Food series of 'Jazz Brakes' back in the early 90's, and along the way they met Patrick Carpenter (PC) who was commonly misconstrued as the computer that they made the tracks on for a while. A loose collaborative team began to form as more like-minded people arrived at the party; Paul Brook, Paul Rabiger, Strictly Kev and Issac Elliston to name a few.

Whilst keeping their hand in as DJs, Matt & Jon couldn't and didn't want to DJ twice in one night under both aliases of Coldcut & DJ Food, so PC & Strictly stepped up to represent the Food club-wise. This was the score for some time, until PC became so busy with his involvement in the Cinematic Orchestra that he decided to depart to concentrate on that, leaving Strictly Kev to carry the mantle.

[links_clean] =>

www.djfood.org

Twitter
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Most people come into music, do the same thing for a few years, slowly sink back into obscurity and spend the rest of their life collecting publishing royalties and re-forming for tribute tours. Their biographies can afford to be quite short – most of us aren’t that interested in golf or angling. The problem with Coldcut is that, despite their veteran status, they act like two unruly children who just won’t sit still. Which is why even a brief trawl through their various activities looks like a large chapter of a big book. 
In 1986, computer programmer Matt Black and ex-art teacher Jonathan More were part-time DJs on the rare groove scene. More also DJed on pirate radio, hosting the Meltdown Show on Kiss FM and worked at the Reckless Records store on Berwick Street, London where Black visited as a customer. The first collaboration between the two artists was 'Say Kids What Time Is It?' on a white label in January 1987, which mixed Jungle Book's "King of the Swingers" with the break from James Brown's "Funky Drummer." The innovation of "Say Kids..." caused More and Black to be heralded by SPIN as "the first Brit artists to really get hip-hop’s class-cutup aesthetic". It’s regarded as the UK’s first breaks record, the first UK record to be built entirely of samples and "the final link in the chain connecting European collage-experiment with the dance-remix-scratch edit". This was later sampled in "Pump Up the Volume" by MARRS, a single that reached #1 in the UK in October 1987. 
Though Black had joined Kiss FM with his own mix-based show, the pair eventually joined forces with their own show, later in 1987, called Solid Steel. The eclectic show became a unifying force in underground experimental electronic music, and is still running to date, celebrating 25 years in 2013. 
The duo adopted the name Coldcut, and set up a record label called Ahead Of Our Time to release the single Beats + Pieces (one of the formats also included "That Greedy Beat") in 1987. All of these tracks were assembled using cassette pause button edits, and later spliced tape loops that would sometimes run "all over the room.” The duo used sampling from Led Zeppelin to James Brown. Electronic act The Chemical Brothers have described ‘Beats + Pieces’ as the ‘first bigbeat record’, a style which appeared in the mid-90s. 
Coldcut's first mainstream success came when Julian Palmer from Island Records asked them to remix Eric B. & Rakim's "Paid in Full". Released in October 1987, the landmark remix is said to have "laid the groundwork for hip hop’s entry into the UK mainstream", becoming a breakthrough hit for Eric B & Rakim outside the U.S., reaching #15 in the UK and the top 20 in a number of European countries. It featured a prominent Ofra Haza sample and many other vocal cut ups as well as a looped rhythm which later, when speeded up, proved popular in the Breakbeat genre. Off the back of its success in clubs, the Coldcut "Seven Minutes of Madness" remix ended up being promoted as the single in the UK. 
In 1988, More and Black formed Hex, a self-titled "multimedia pop group," with Mile Visman and Rob Pepperell. While working on videos for artists such as Kevin Saunderson, Queen Latifah and Spiritualized, Hex’s collaborative work went on to incorporate 3D modelling, punk video art, and algorithmic visuals on desktop machines. The video for Coldcut’s ‘Christmas Break’ in 1989 is arguably one of the first pop promos produced entirely on microcomputers. 
In 1988, Coldcut released ‘Out To Lunch With Ahead Of Our Time,’ a double LP of Coldcut productions and re-cuts, and the various aliases under which the duo had recorded. This continued the duo’s tradition of releasing limited availability vinyl. 
The next Coldcut single, released in February 1988, moved towards a more house-influenced style. "Doctorin' the House", which debuted singer Yazz, became a top ten hit, and peaked at #6. In the same year, under the guise Yazz and the Plastic Population, they produced "The Only Way Is Up", a cover of a Northern Soul song. The record reached #1 in the UK in August, and remained there for five weeks, becoming 1988’s second biggest selling single. Producer Youth of Killing Joke also helped Coldcut with this record. The duo had another top hit in September with "Stop This Crazy Thing", which featured reggae vocalist Junior Reid and reached number 21 in the UK. 
The single "People Hold On" became another UK Top 20 hit. Released in March 1989, it helped launch the career of the then relatively unknown singer Lisa Stansfield. Coldcut and Mark Saunders produced her debut solo single "This Is the Right Time", which became another UK Top 20 hit in August as well as reaching #21 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 the following year. 
As the duo started to enjoy critical and commercial success, their debut album What's That Noise? was released in April 1989 on Ahead of Our Time and distributed by Big Life Records. The album gave "breaks the full length treatment", and showcased "their heady blend of hip-hop production aesthetics and proto-acid house grooves". It also rounded up a heap of unconventional guest features, quoted by SPIN as having "somehow found room at the same table for Queen Latifah and Mark E. Smith". The album’s track ‘I’m in Deep’ (featuring Smith) prefigured the Indie-dance guitar-breaks crossover of such bands as the Stone Roses and Happy Mondays, utilizing Smith’s freestyle raucous vocals over an acid house backing, and also including psych guitar samples from British rock band Deep Purple. What’s That Noise? reached the Top 20 in the UK and was certified Silver. 
Coldcut's second album, Some Like It Cold released in 1990 on Ahead Of Our Time, featured a collaboration with Queen Latifah on the single "Find a Way". Though "Find a Way" was a minor hit in the UK, no more singles were released from the album. The duo was given the BPI "Producer of the Year Award" in 1990. Hex - alongside some other London visual experimenters such as iE - produced a series of videos for a longform VHS version of the album. This continued Coldcut and Hex’s pioneering of the use of microcomputers to synthesize electronic music visuals. 
After their success with Lisa Stansfield, Coldcut signed with her label, Arista. Conflicts arose with the major label, as Coldcut’s "vision extended beyond the formulae of house and techno" and mainstream pop culture. Eventually, the duo’s album Philosophy emerged in 1993. Singles "Dreamer" and "Autumn Leaves" (1994) were both minor hits but the album did not chart. 
"Autumn Leaves" had strings recorded at Abbey Road, with a 30 piece string section and an arrangement by film composer Ed Shearmur. The leader of the string section was Simon Jeffes of Penguin Cafe Orchestra. Coldcut’s insistence on their friend Mixmaster Morris to remix "Autumn Leaves" led to one of Morris’ most celebrated remixes, which became a minor legend in ambient music. It has appeared on numerous compilations. 
In 1990, whilst on their first tour in Japan (which also featured Norman Cook, who later became Fatboy Slim), Matt and Jon formed their second record label, Ninja Tune, as a self-titled ’technocoloured escape pod,’ and a way to escape the creative control of major labels. The label enabled them to release music under different aliases (e.g.. Bogus Order, DJ Food), which also helped them to avoid pigeonholing as producers. Ninja Tune’s first release was Bogus Order’s ‘Zen Brakes.’ The name Coldcut stayed with Arista, so there were no official Coldcut releases for the next three years. 
During this time, Coldcut still produced for artists on their new label, releasing a flood of material under different names and continuing to work with young groups. They additionally kept on with Solid Steel on Kiss FM and running the night club Stealth (Club of the Year in the NME, The Face, and Mixmag in 1996). 
In 1991, Hex released their first video game, ‘Top Banana’, which was included on a Hex release for the Commodore CDTV machine in 1992, arguably the first complete purpose-designed multimedia system. ‘Top Banana’ was innovative in that it used sampled graphics, contained an ecological theme and a female lead character (dubbed ‘KT’), and its music changed through random processes. Coldcut and Hex presented this multimedia project as an example of the forthcoming convergence of pop music and computer game characters. 
In 1992, Hex’s first single - ‘Global Chaos’ / ‘Digital Love Opus 1’ - combined rave visuals with techno and ambient interactive visuals.[32] In November of that year, Hex released Global Chaos CDTV, which took advantage of the possibilities of the new CD-ROM medium. The Global Chaos CDTV disk (which contained the ‘Top Banana’ game, interactive visuals and audio), was a forerunner of the "CD+" concept, uniting music, graphics, and video games into one. This multi-dimensional entertainment product received wide coverage in the national media, including features on Dance Energy, Kaleidoscope on BBC Radio 4, What's Up Doc? on ITV and Reportage on BBC 2. i-D Magazine was quoted as saying, "It's like your TV tripping". 
Coldcut videos were made for most songs, often by Hexstatic, and used a lot of stock and sampled footage. Their ‘Timber’ video, which created an AV collage piece using analogous techniques to audio sample collage, was put on heavy rotation on MTV. Stuart Warren Hill of Hexstatic referred to this technique as: "What you see is what you hear." ‘Timber’ (which appears on both ‘Let Us Play’, Coldcut’s fourth album, and ‘Let Us Replay,’ their fifth) won awards for its innovative use of repetitive video clips synced to the music, including being shortlisted at the Edinburgh Television and Film Festival in their top five music videos of the year in 1998. 
Coldcut began integrating video sampling into their live DJ gigs at the time, and incorporated multimedia content that caused press to credit the act as segueing "into the computer age". Throughout the 90s, Hex created visuals for Coldcut’s live performances, and developed the CD-ROM portion of Coldcut’s ‘Let Us Play’ and ‘Let Us Replay,’ in addition to software developed specifically for the album’s world tour. Hex’s inclusion of music videos and ‘playtools’ (playful art/music software programs) on Coldcut’s CD-Roms was completely ahead of the curve at that time, offering viewers/listeners a high level of interactivity. Playtools such as My Little Funkit and Playtime were the prototypes for Ninja Jamm, the app Coldcut designed and launched 16 years later. Playtime followed on from Coldcut and Hex’s Synopticon installation, developing the auto-cutup algorhythm, and using other random processes to generate surprising combinations. Coldcut and Hex performed live using Playtime at the 1st Sonar Festival in 1994. Playtime was also used to generate the backing track for Coldcut’s collaboration with Jello Biafra, ‘Every Home a Prison’. 
In 1994 Coldcut and Hex contributed an installation to the Glasgow Gallery of Modern Art. The piece, called 'Generator' was installed in the Fire Gallery. Generator was an interactive installation which allowed users to mix sound, video, text and graphics and make their own audio-visual mix, modelled on the techniques and technology used by Coldcut in clubs and live performance events. It consisted of two consoles: the left controlling how the sounds are played, the right controlling how the images are played. 
As part of the JAM exhibition of "Style, Music and Media" at the Barbican Art Gallery in 1996, Coldcut and Hex were commissioned to produce an interactive audiovisual piece called Synopticon. Conceived and designed by Robert Pepperell and Matt Black, the digital culture synthesiser allows users to "remix" sounds, images, text and music in a partially random, partially controlled way. 
The year 1996 also brought the Coldcut name back to More and Black, and the pair celebrated with ‘70 Minutes of Madness,’ a mix CD that became part of the Journeys by DJ series. The release was credited with "bringing to wider attention the sort of freestyle mixing the pair were always known for through their radio show on KISS FM, Solid Steel, and their steady club dates". It was voted "Best Compilation of All Time" by Jockey Slut in 1998. 
In February 1997, they released a double pack single "Atomic Moog 2000" / "Boot the System", the first Coldcut release on Ninja Tune. This was not eligible for the UK chart because time and format restrictions prevented the inclusion of the ‘Natural Rhythm’ video on the CD. In August 1997, a reworking of the early track "More Beats + Pieces" gave them their first UK Top 40 hit since 1989. 
The album Let Us Play! followed in September and also made the Top 40. The fourth album by Coldcut, Let Us Play! paid homage to the greats that inspired them. Their first album to be released on Ninja Tune, it featured guest appearances by Grandmaster Flash, Steinski, Jello Biafra, Jimpster, The Herbaliser, Talvin Singh, Daniel Pemberton and Selena Saliva. Coldcut’s cut 'n' paste method on the album was compared to that of Dadaism and William Burroughs. Hex collaborated with Coldcut to produce the multimedia CD-Rom for the album. Hex later evolved the software into the engine that was used on the Let Us Play! world tour. 
In 1997, Matt Black - alongside Cambridge based developers Camart - created real-time video manipulation software VJamm. It allowed users to be a "digital video jockey,", remixing and collaging sound and images and trigger audio and visual samples simultaneously, subsequently bringing futuristic technology to the audio-visual field. VJamm rivalled some of the features of high-end and high cost tech at the time. The VJamm technology, praised as being proof of how far computers changed the face of live music, became seminal in both Coldcut's live sets (which were called a "revelaton" by Melody Maker and DJ sets. Their CCTV live show was featured at major festivals including Glastonbury, Roskilde, Sónar, the Montreux Jazz Festival, and John Peel's Meltdown. The "beautifully simple and devastatingly effective" software was deemed revolutionary, and became recognized as a major factor in the evolution of clubs. It eventually earned a place in the American Museum of the Moving Image's permanent collection. As quoted by The Independent: "Coldcut's motto? 'Don't hate the media, be the media." NME was quoted as saying: "Veteran duo Coldcut are so cool they invented the remix - now they are doing the same for television." 
Also working with Camart, Black designed DJamm software in 1998, which Coldcut used on laptops for their live shows, providing the audio bed alongside VJamm’s audiovisual samples. Matt Black explained they designed DJamm so they "could perform electronic music in a different way – i.e., not just taking a session band out to reproduce what you put together in the studio using samples. It had a relationship to DJing, but was more interactive and more effective." Excitingly at that time, DJamm was pioneering in its ability to shuffle sliced loops into intricate sequences, enabling users to split loops into any number of parts. 
In 1999, Let Us Replay! was released, a double-disc remix album where Coldcut’s classic tunes were remixed by the likes of Cornelius (which was heralded as a highlight of the album, Irresistible Force, Shut Up And Dance, Carl Craig and J Swinscoe. Let Us Replay! pieces together "short sharp shocks that put the mental in ‘experimental’ and still bring the breaks till the breakadawn". It also includes a few live tracks from the duo’s innovative world tour. The CD-Rom of the album, which also contained a free demo disc of the VJamm software, was one of the earliest audiovisual CD- ROMs on the market, and Muzik claimed deserved to "have them canonized...it’s like buying an entire mini studio for under $15." 
In 2000, the Solid Steel show moved to BBC London. 
Coldcut continued to forge interesting collaborations, including 2001's "Revolution," an EP in which Coldcut created their own political party (The Guilty Party). Featuring scratches and samples of Tony Blair and William Hague speeches, the 3-track EP included Nautilus' "Space Journey," which won an Intermusic contest in 2000. The video was widely played on MTV. With ‘Space Journey,’ Coldcut were arguably the first group to give fans access to the multitrack parts, or "stems," of their songs, building on the idea of interactivity and sharing from Let Us Play. 
In 2001, Coldcut produced tracks for the Sega music video game REZ. REZ replaced typical video game sound effect with electronic music; the player created sounds and melodies, intended to simulate a form of synesthesia. The soundtrack also featured Adam Freeland and Oval. 
In 2002, while utilizing VJamm and Detraktor, Coldcut and Juxta remixed Herbie Hancock’s classic ‘Rockit,’ creating both an audio and video remix. 
Working with Marcus Clements in 2002, Coldcut released the sample manipulation algorhythm from their DJamm software as a standalone VST plugin that could be used in other software, naming it the Coldcutter. 
Also in 2002, Coldcut with UK VJs Headspace (now mainly performing as the VJamm Allstars developed Gridio, an interactive, immersive audio-visual installation for the Pompidou Centre as part of the ‘Sonic Process’ exhibition. The ‘Sonic Process’ exhibition was launched at the MACBA in Barcelona in conjunction with Sónar, featuring Gridio as its centerpiece. In 2003, a commission for Graz led to a specially built version of Gridio, in a cave inside the castle mountain in Austria. Gridio was later commissioned by O2 for two simultaneous customised installations at the O2 Wireless Festivals in Leeds and London in 2007. That same year, Gridio was featured as part of Optronica at the opening week of the new BFI Southbank development in London. 
In 2003, Black worked with Penny Rimbaud (ex Crass) on Crass Agenda's Savage Utopia project. Black performed the piece with Rimbaud, Eve Libertine and other players at London’s Vortex Jazz Club. 
In 2004, Coldcut collaborated with American video mashup artist TV Sheriff to produce their cut-up entitled ‘Revolution USA.’ The tactical-media project (coordinated with Canadian art duo NomIg) followed on from the UK version and extended the premise "into an open access participatory project". Through the multimedia political art project, over 12 gigabytes of footage from the last 40 years of US politics were made accessible to download, allowing participants to create a cut-up over a Coldcut beat. Coldcut also collaborated with TV Sheriff and NomIg to produce two audiovisual pieces "World of Evil" (2004) and "Revolution '08" (2008), both composed of footage from the United States presidential elections of respective years. The music used was composed by Coldcut, with "Revolution '08" featuring a remix by the Qemists. 
Later that year, a collaboration with the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) led to the psychedelic art documentary 'Wavejammer.’ Coldcut was given access to the BAS archive in order to create sounds and visuals for the short film. 
2004 also saw Coldcut produce a radio play in conjunction with renowned young author Hari Kunzru for BBC Radio 3 (incidentally called 'Sound Mirrors'). 
Coldcut returned with the single "Everything Is Under Control” at the end of 2005, featuring Jon Spencer (of Jon Spencer Blues Explosion) and Mike Ladd. It was followed in 2006 by their fifth studio album Sound Mirrors, which was quoted as being “one of the most vital and imaginative records Jon Moore and Matt Black have ever made”, and saw the duo "continue, impressively, to find new ways to present political statements through a gamut of pristine electronics and breakbeats" (CITATION: Future Music, 2007). The fascinating array of guest vocalists included Soweto Kinch, Annette Peacock, Ameri Baraka, and Saul Williams. The latter followed on from Coldcut’s remix of Williams’ ‘The Pledge’ for a project with DJ Spooky. 
A 100-date audiovisual world tour commenced for ‘Sound Mirrors,’ which was considered "no small feat in terms of technology or human effort". Coldcut was accompanied by scratch DJ Raj and AV artist Juxta, in addition to guest vocalists from the album, including UK rapper Juice Aleem, Roots Manuva, Mpho Skeef, Jon Spencer and house legend Robert Owens. 
Three further singles were released from the album including the Top 75 hit "True Skool" with Roots Manuva. The same track appeared on the soundtrack of the video game FIFA Street 2. 
Sponsored by the British Council, in 2005 Coldcut introduced AV mixing to India with the Union project, alongside collaborators Howie B and Aki Nawaz of Fun-Da-Mental. Coldcut created an A/V remix of the Bollywood hit movie ‘Kal Ho Naa Ho’. 
In 2006, Coldcut performed an A/V set based on "Music for 18 Musicians" as part of Steve Reich’s 70th birthday gig at the Barbican Centre in London. 
Coldcut remixed another classic song in 2007: Nina Simone’s ‘Save Me.’ This was part of a remix album called ‘Nina Simone: Remixed & Re-imagined,’ featuring remixes from Tony Humphries, Francois K and Chris Coco. 
In February 2007, Coldcut and Mixmaster Morris created a psychedelic AV obituary/tribute Coldcut, Mixmaster Morris, Ken Campbell, Bill Drummond and Alan Moore (18 March 2007). Robert Anton Wilson tribute show. Queen Elizabeth Hall, London: Mixmaster Morris. (28 August 2009) to Robert Anton Wilson, the 60s author of Illuminatus! Trilogy. The tribute featured graphic novel writer Alan Moore and artist Bill Drummond and a performance by experimental theatre legend Ken Campbell. Coldcut and Morris’ hour and a half performance resembled a documentary being remixed on the fly, cutting up nearly 15 hours’ worth of Wilson’s lectures. 
In 2008, an international group of party organisers, activists and artists including Coldcut received a grant from the Intelligent Energy Department of the European Union, to create a project that promoted intelligent energy and environmental awareness to the youth of Europe. The result was Energy Union, a piece of VJ cinema, political campaign, music tour, party, art exhibition and social media hub. Energy Union toured 12 EU countries throughout 2009 and 2010, completing 24 events in total. Coldcut created the Energy Union show for the tour, a one-hour Audio/Visual montage on the theme of Intelligent Energy. In presenting new ideas for climate, environmental and energy communication strategies, the Energy Union tour was well received, and reached a widespread audience in cities across the UK, Germany, Belgium, The Netherlands, Croatia, Slovenia, Austria, Hungary, Bulgaria, Spain and the Czech Republic. 
Also in 2008, Coldcut was asked to remix the theme song for British cult TV show Doctor Who for the program’s 40th anniversary. In October 2008, Coldcut celebrated the legacy of the BBC Radiophonic Workshop (the place where the Doctor Who theme was created) with a live DJ mix at London’s legendary Roundhouse. The live mix incorporated classic Radiophonic Workshop compositions with extended sampling of the original gear. 
Additionally in 2008, Coldcut remixed "Ourselves", a Japanese #1 hit from the single "&" by Ayumi Hamasaki. This mix was included on the album Ayu-mi-x 6: Gold. 
Starting in 2009, Matt Black, with musician/artist/coder Paul Miller (creator of the TX Modular Open Source synth), developed Granul8, a new type of visual fx/source Black termed a ‘granular video synthesiser’. Granul8 allows the use of realtime VJ techniques including video feedback combined with VDMX VJ software. 
From 2009 onwards, Black has been collaborating with coder and psychedelic mathematician William Rood to create a forthcoming project called Liveloom, a social media AV mixer. 
In 2010, Coldcut celebrated 20 years of releasing music with its label, Ninja Tune. A book entitled Ninja Tune: 20 Years of Beats and Pieces was released on 12 August 2010, and an exhibition was held at Black Dog Publishing's Black Dog Space in London, showcasing artwork, design and photography from the label's 20-year history. A compilation album was released on 20 September in two formats: a regular version consisting of two 2-disc volumes, and a limited edition which contained six CDs, six 7" vinyl singles, a hardback copy of the book, a poster and additional items. Ninja Tune also incorporated a series of international parties. This repositioned Ninja as a continually compelling and influential label, being one of the "longest-running (and successful) UK indie labels to come out of the late-1980s/early-90s explosion in dance music and hip-hop" (Pitchfork, 28 September 2010). Pitchfork claimed it had a "right to show off a little". 
In July 2013, Coldcut produced a piece entitled ‘D’autre’ based on the writings of French poet Arthur Rimbaud, for Forum Des Images in Paris.The following month, in August, Coldcut produced a new soundtrack for a section of André Sauvage’s classic film Études sur Paris, which was shown as part of Noise of Art at the BFI in London, which celebrated 100 years of Electronic Music and Silent Cinema. Coldcut put new music to films from the Russolo era, incorporating original recordings of Russolo's proto-synths. 
In April 2013, Coldcut released Ninja Jamm, an iOS music app, in collaboration with London-based technology crew Seeper. Initially, the app allowed users to purchase and remix ‘Tunepacks’ of original tracks by Coldcut and other Ninja artists. These packs became part of the Ninja Tune release schedule, often being released simultaneously with traditional formats. Ninja Jamm was featured on the New and Noteworthy section of the App Store on release, and has received over 300,000 downloads to date. 
The powerful, ‘intuitive yet deep,’ app allowed users significant scope to play with, edit and re-work Ninja releases. Coldcut used it in their DJ sets, constantly improving and updating it. 
In summer 2015, Ninja Jamm and Loopmasters launched ‘Samplepacks,’ containing genre specific samples and turning Ninja Jamm into a powerful, original music creation app. Users are now able to turn instruments on and off, swap between clips, add glitches and effects, trigger and pitch-bend stabs and one-off samples, and change the tempo of the track under touch control. Users can additionally record as they play and instantly share their jamms via Soundcloud, Facebook and other means. 
To date over 20 tunepacks have been released, including Amon Tobin, Bonobo, Coldcut, DJ Food, Lapalux, Machinedrum, Congo Natty, Irresistible Force, FaltyDL and many more, and in July 2015 it is planned to release the app on Android. 
In 2013, Coldcut began working on a new album, collaborating with producer Dave Taylor (a.k.a. Solid Groove a.k.a. Switch). As of Summer 2015, this latest chapter in their legendary catalogue is nearing completion. 
Ninja Tune turns 25 in 2015. Coldcut founded the label to release the future-gazing music that excited them, and to do so without boundaries, and based purely on its quality and originality. The label’s remit remains exactly that, a quarter of a century later. 
And Coldcut themselves are as irrepressible as ever. Lauded as the number 3 DJs of all time by Music Radar, in recent months they’ve contributed an original, interactive, cutup installation for one of their creative precursors, William Burroughs, at his ‘Animals in the Wall’ exhibition. 
Their long term relationship with Greenpeace continued with DJ sets for the organization at Glastonbury for the last two years. In the same vein, ‘Everything is Under Control’ was used for ‘The Revolution with be Televised,’ the BBS activist comedy show broadcast in 2013. Matt Black has found a natural calling giving talks and lectures at events and teaching establishments, his long-standing political activism finding itself in renewed demand in turbulent times. 
And coming soon will be a brand new studio album, which will see Coldcut back in the vanguard of electronic music, and collaborating with some of the best musical mavericks from around the world – a group they’ve long been counted amongst.
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Most people come into music, do the same thing for a few years, slowly sink back into obscurity and spend the rest of their life collecting publishing royalties and re-forming for tribute tours. Their biographies can afford to be quite short – most of us aren’t that interested in golf or angling. The problem with Coldcut is that, despite their veteran status, they act like two unruly children who just won’t sit still. Which is why even a brief trawl through their various activities looks like a large chapter of a big book. 
In 1986, computer programmer Matt Black and ex-art teacher Jonathan More were part-time DJs on the rare groove scene. More also DJed on pirate radio, hosting the Meltdown Show on Kiss FM and worked at the Reckless Records store on Berwick Street, London where Black visited as a customer. The first collaboration between the two artists was 'Say Kids What Time Is It?' on a white label in January 1987, which mixed Jungle Book's "King of the Swingers" with the break from James Brown's "Funky Drummer." The innovation of "Say Kids..." caused More and Black to be heralded by SPIN as "the first Brit artists to really get hip-hop’s class-cutup aesthetic". It’s regarded as the UK’s first breaks record, the first UK record to be built entirely of samples and "the final link in the chain connecting European collage-experiment with the dance-remix-scratch edit". This was later sampled in "Pump Up the Volume" by MARRS, a single that reached #1 in the UK in October 1987. 
Though Black had joined Kiss FM with his own mix-based show, the pair eventually joined forces with their own show, later in 1987, called Solid Steel. The eclectic show became a unifying force in underground experimental electronic music, and is still running to date, celebrating 25 years in 2013. 
The duo adopted the name Coldcut, and set up a record label called Ahead Of Our Time to release the single Beats + Pieces (one of the formats also included "That Greedy Beat") in 1987. All of these tracks were assembled using cassette pause button edits, and later spliced tape loops that would sometimes run "all over the room.” The duo used sampling from Led Zeppelin to James Brown. Electronic act The Chemical Brothers have described ‘Beats + Pieces’ as the ‘first bigbeat record’, a style which appeared in the mid-90s. 
Coldcut's first mainstream success came when Julian Palmer from Island Records asked them to remix Eric B. & Rakim's "Paid in Full". Released in October 1987, the landmark remix is said to have "laid the groundwork for hip hop’s entry into the UK mainstream", becoming a breakthrough hit for Eric B & Rakim outside the U.S., reaching #15 in the UK and the top 20 in a number of European countries. It featured a prominent Ofra Haza sample and many other vocal cut ups as well as a looped rhythm which later, when speeded up, proved popular in the Breakbeat genre. Off the back of its success in clubs, the Coldcut "Seven Minutes of Madness" remix ended up being promoted as the single in the UK. 
In 1988, More and Black formed Hex, a self-titled "multimedia pop group," with Mile Visman and Rob Pepperell. While working on videos for artists such as Kevin Saunderson, Queen Latifah and Spiritualized, Hex’s collaborative work went on to incorporate 3D modelling, punk video art, and algorithmic visuals on desktop machines. The video for Coldcut’s ‘Christmas Break’ in 1989 is arguably one of the first pop promos produced entirely on microcomputers. 
In 1988, Coldcut released ‘Out To Lunch With Ahead Of Our Time,’ a double LP of Coldcut productions and re-cuts, and the various aliases under which the duo had recorded. This continued the duo’s tradition of releasing limited availability vinyl. 
The next Coldcut single, released in February 1988, moved towards a more house-influenced style. "Doctorin' the House", which debuted singer Yazz, became a top ten hit, and peaked at #6. In the same year, under the guise Yazz and the Plastic Population, they produced "The Only Way Is Up", a cover of a Northern Soul song. The record reached #1 in the UK in August, and remained there for five weeks, becoming 1988’s second biggest selling single. Producer Youth of Killing Joke also helped Coldcut with this record. The duo had another top hit in September with "Stop This Crazy Thing", which featured reggae vocalist Junior Reid and reached number 21 in the UK. 
The single "People Hold On" became another UK Top 20 hit. Released in March 1989, it helped launch the career of the then relatively unknown singer Lisa Stansfield. Coldcut and Mark Saunders produced her debut solo single "This Is the Right Time", which became another UK Top 20 hit in August as well as reaching #21 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 the following year. 
As the duo started to enjoy critical and commercial success, their debut album What's That Noise? was released in April 1989 on Ahead of Our Time and distributed by Big Life Records. The album gave "breaks the full length treatment", and showcased "their heady blend of hip-hop production aesthetics and proto-acid house grooves". It also rounded up a heap of unconventional guest features, quoted by SPIN as having "somehow found room at the same table for Queen Latifah and Mark E. Smith". The album’s track ‘I’m in Deep’ (featuring Smith) prefigured the Indie-dance guitar-breaks crossover of such bands as the Stone Roses and Happy Mondays, utilizing Smith’s freestyle raucous vocals over an acid house backing, and also including psych guitar samples from British rock band Deep Purple. What’s That Noise? reached the Top 20 in the UK and was certified Silver. 
Coldcut's second album, Some Like It Cold released in 1990 on Ahead Of Our Time, featured a collaboration with Queen Latifah on the single "Find a Way". Though "Find a Way" was a minor hit in the UK, no more singles were released from the album. The duo was given the BPI "Producer of the Year Award" in 1990. Hex - alongside some other London visual experimenters such as iE - produced a series of videos for a longform VHS version of the album. This continued Coldcut and Hex’s pioneering of the use of microcomputers to synthesize electronic music visuals. 
After their success with Lisa Stansfield, Coldcut signed with her label, Arista. Conflicts arose with the major label, as Coldcut’s "vision extended beyond the formulae of house and techno" and mainstream pop culture. Eventually, the duo’s album Philosophy emerged in 1993. Singles "Dreamer" and "Autumn Leaves" (1994) were both minor hits but the album did not chart. 
"Autumn Leaves" had strings recorded at Abbey Road, with a 30 piece string section and an arrangement by film composer Ed Shearmur. The leader of the string section was Simon Jeffes of Penguin Cafe Orchestra. Coldcut’s insistence on their friend Mixmaster Morris to remix "Autumn Leaves" led to one of Morris’ most celebrated remixes, which became a minor legend in ambient music. It has appeared on numerous compilations. 
In 1990, whilst on their first tour in Japan (which also featured Norman Cook, who later became Fatboy Slim), Matt and Jon formed their second record label, Ninja Tune, as a self-titled ’technocoloured escape pod,’ and a way to escape the creative control of major labels. The label enabled them to release music under different aliases (e.g.. Bogus Order, DJ Food), which also helped them to avoid pigeonholing as producers. Ninja Tune’s first release was Bogus Order’s ‘Zen Brakes.’ The name Coldcut stayed with Arista, so there were no official Coldcut releases for the next three years. 
During this time, Coldcut still produced for artists on their new label, releasing a flood of material under different names and continuing to work with young groups. They additionally kept on with Solid Steel on Kiss FM and running the night club Stealth (Club of the Year in the NME, The Face, and Mixmag in 1996). 
In 1991, Hex released their first video game, ‘Top Banana’, which was included on a Hex release for the Commodore CDTV machine in 1992, arguably the first complete purpose-designed multimedia system. ‘Top Banana’ was innovative in that it used sampled graphics, contained an ecological theme and a female lead character (dubbed ‘KT’), and its music changed through random processes. Coldcut and Hex presented this multimedia project as an example of the forthcoming convergence of pop music and computer game characters. 
In 1992, Hex’s first single - ‘Global Chaos’ / ‘Digital Love Opus 1’ - combined rave visuals with techno and ambient interactive visuals.[32] In November of that year, Hex released Global Chaos CDTV, which took advantage of the possibilities of the new CD-ROM medium. The Global Chaos CDTV disk (which contained the ‘Top Banana’ game, interactive visuals and audio), was a forerunner of the "CD+" concept, uniting music, graphics, and video games into one. This multi-dimensional entertainment product received wide coverage in the national media, including features on Dance Energy, Kaleidoscope on BBC Radio 4, What's Up Doc? on ITV and Reportage on BBC 2. i-D Magazine was quoted as saying, "It's like your TV tripping". 
Coldcut videos were made for most songs, often by Hexstatic, and used a lot of stock and sampled footage. Their ‘Timber’ video, which created an AV collage piece using analogous techniques to audio sample collage, was put on heavy rotation on MTV. Stuart Warren Hill of Hexstatic referred to this technique as: "What you see is what you hear." ‘Timber’ (which appears on both ‘Let Us Play’, Coldcut’s fourth album, and ‘Let Us Replay,’ their fifth) won awards for its innovative use of repetitive video clips synced to the music, including being shortlisted at the Edinburgh Television and Film Festival in their top five music videos of the year in 1998. 
Coldcut began integrating video sampling into their live DJ gigs at the time, and incorporated multimedia content that caused press to credit the act as segueing "into the computer age". Throughout the 90s, Hex created visuals for Coldcut’s live performances, and developed the CD-ROM portion of Coldcut’s ‘Let Us Play’ and ‘Let Us Replay,’ in addition to software developed specifically for the album’s world tour. Hex’s inclusion of music videos and ‘playtools’ (playful art/music software programs) on Coldcut’s CD-Roms was completely ahead of the curve at that time, offering viewers/listeners a high level of interactivity. Playtools such as My Little Funkit and Playtime were the prototypes for Ninja Jamm, the app Coldcut designed and launched 16 years later. Playtime followed on from Coldcut and Hex’s Synopticon installation, developing the auto-cutup algorhythm, and using other random processes to generate surprising combinations. Coldcut and Hex performed live using Playtime at the 1st Sonar Festival in 1994. Playtime was also used to generate the backing track for Coldcut’s collaboration with Jello Biafra, ‘Every Home a Prison’. 
In 1994 Coldcut and Hex contributed an installation to the Glasgow Gallery of Modern Art. The piece, called 'Generator' was installed in the Fire Gallery. Generator was an interactive installation which allowed users to mix sound, video, text and graphics and make their own audio-visual mix, modelled on the techniques and technology used by Coldcut in clubs and live performance events. It consisted of two consoles: the left controlling how the sounds are played, the right controlling how the images are played. 
As part of the JAM exhibition of "Style, Music and Media" at the Barbican Art Gallery in 1996, Coldcut and Hex were commissioned to produce an interactive audiovisual piece called Synopticon. Conceived and designed by Robert Pepperell and Matt Black, the digital culture synthesiser allows users to "remix" sounds, images, text and music in a partially random, partially controlled way. 
The year 1996 also brought the Coldcut name back to More and Black, and the pair celebrated with ‘70 Minutes of Madness,’ a mix CD that became part of the Journeys by DJ series. The release was credited with "bringing to wider attention the sort of freestyle mixing the pair were always known for through their radio show on KISS FM, Solid Steel, and their steady club dates". It was voted "Best Compilation of All Time" by Jockey Slut in 1998. 
In February 1997, they released a double pack single "Atomic Moog 2000" / "Boot the System", the first Coldcut release on Ninja Tune. This was not eligible for the UK chart because time and format restrictions prevented the inclusion of the ‘Natural Rhythm’ video on the CD. In August 1997, a reworking of the early track "More Beats + Pieces" gave them their first UK Top 40 hit since 1989. 
The album Let Us Play! followed in September and also made the Top 40. The fourth album by Coldcut, Let Us Play! paid homage to the greats that inspired them. Their first album to be released on Ninja Tune, it featured guest appearances by Grandmaster Flash, Steinski, Jello Biafra, Jimpster, The Herbaliser, Talvin Singh, Daniel Pemberton and Selena Saliva. Coldcut’s cut 'n' paste method on the album was compared to that of Dadaism and William Burroughs. Hex collaborated with Coldcut to produce the multimedia CD-Rom for the album. Hex later evolved the software into the engine that was used on the Let Us Play! world tour. 
In 1997, Matt Black - alongside Cambridge based developers Camart - created real-time video manipulation software VJamm. It allowed users to be a "digital video jockey,", remixing and collaging sound and images and trigger audio and visual samples simultaneously, subsequently bringing futuristic technology to the audio-visual field. VJamm rivalled some of the features of high-end and high cost tech at the time. The VJamm technology, praised as being proof of how far computers changed the face of live music, became seminal in both Coldcut's live sets (which were called a "revelaton" by Melody Maker and DJ sets. Their CCTV live show was featured at major festivals including Glastonbury, Roskilde, Sónar, the Montreux Jazz Festival, and John Peel's Meltdown. The "beautifully simple and devastatingly effective" software was deemed revolutionary, and became recognized as a major factor in the evolution of clubs. It eventually earned a place in the American Museum of the Moving Image's permanent collection. As quoted by The Independent: "Coldcut's motto? 'Don't hate the media, be the media." NME was quoted as saying: "Veteran duo Coldcut are so cool they invented the remix - now they are doing the same for television." 
Also working with Camart, Black designed DJamm software in 1998, which Coldcut used on laptops for their live shows, providing the audio bed alongside VJamm’s audiovisual samples. Matt Black explained they designed DJamm so they "could perform electronic music in a different way – i.e., not just taking a session band out to reproduce what you put together in the studio using samples. It had a relationship to DJing, but was more interactive and more effective." Excitingly at that time, DJamm was pioneering in its ability to shuffle sliced loops into intricate sequences, enabling users to split loops into any number of parts. 
In 1999, Let Us Replay! was released, a double-disc remix album where Coldcut’s classic tunes were remixed by the likes of Cornelius (which was heralded as a highlight of the album, Irresistible Force, Shut Up And Dance, Carl Craig and J Swinscoe. Let Us Replay! pieces together "short sharp shocks that put the mental in ‘experimental’ and still bring the breaks till the breakadawn". It also includes a few live tracks from the duo’s innovative world tour. The CD-Rom of the album, which also contained a free demo disc of the VJamm software, was one of the earliest audiovisual CD- ROMs on the market, and Muzik claimed deserved to "have them canonized...it’s like buying an entire mini studio for under $15." 
In 2000, the Solid Steel show moved to BBC London. 
Coldcut continued to forge interesting collaborations, including 2001's "Revolution," an EP in which Coldcut created their own political party (The Guilty Party). Featuring scratches and samples of Tony Blair and William Hague speeches, the 3-track EP included Nautilus' "Space Journey," which won an Intermusic contest in 2000. The video was widely played on MTV. With ‘Space Journey,’ Coldcut were arguably the first group to give fans access to the multitrack parts, or "stems," of their songs, building on the idea of interactivity and sharing from Let Us Play. 
In 2001, Coldcut produced tracks for the Sega music video game REZ. REZ replaced typical video game sound effect with electronic music; the player created sounds and melodies, intended to simulate a form of synesthesia. The soundtrack also featured Adam Freeland and Oval. 
In 2002, while utilizing VJamm and Detraktor, Coldcut and Juxta remixed Herbie Hancock’s classic ‘Rockit,’ creating both an audio and video remix. 
Working with Marcus Clements in 2002, Coldcut released the sample manipulation algorhythm from their DJamm software as a standalone VST plugin that could be used in other software, naming it the Coldcutter. 
Also in 2002, Coldcut with UK VJs Headspace (now mainly performing as the VJamm Allstars developed Gridio, an interactive, immersive audio-visual installation for the Pompidou Centre as part of the ‘Sonic Process’ exhibition. The ‘Sonic Process’ exhibition was launched at the MACBA in Barcelona in conjunction with Sónar, featuring Gridio as its centerpiece. In 2003, a commission for Graz led to a specially built version of Gridio, in a cave inside the castle mountain in Austria. Gridio was later commissioned by O2 for two simultaneous customised installations at the O2 Wireless Festivals in Leeds and London in 2007. That same year, Gridio was featured as part of Optronica at the opening week of the new BFI Southbank development in London. 
In 2003, Black worked with Penny Rimbaud (ex Crass) on Crass Agenda's Savage Utopia project. Black performed the piece with Rimbaud, Eve Libertine and other players at London’s Vortex Jazz Club. 
In 2004, Coldcut collaborated with American video mashup artist TV Sheriff to produce their cut-up entitled ‘Revolution USA.’ The tactical-media project (coordinated with Canadian art duo NomIg) followed on from the UK version and extended the premise "into an open access participatory project". Through the multimedia political art project, over 12 gigabytes of footage from the last 40 years of US politics were made accessible to download, allowing participants to create a cut-up over a Coldcut beat. Coldcut also collaborated with TV Sheriff and NomIg to produce two audiovisual pieces "World of Evil" (2004) and "Revolution '08" (2008), both composed of footage from the United States presidential elections of respective years. The music used was composed by Coldcut, with "Revolution '08" featuring a remix by the Qemists. 
Later that year, a collaboration with the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) led to the psychedelic art documentary 'Wavejammer.’ Coldcut was given access to the BAS archive in order to create sounds and visuals for the short film. 
2004 also saw Coldcut produce a radio play in conjunction with renowned young author Hari Kunzru for BBC Radio 3 (incidentally called 'Sound Mirrors'). 
Coldcut returned with the single "Everything Is Under Control” at the end of 2005, featuring Jon Spencer (of Jon Spencer Blues Explosion) and Mike Ladd. It was followed in 2006 by their fifth studio album Sound Mirrors, which was quoted as being “one of the most vital and imaginative records Jon Moore and Matt Black have ever made”, and saw the duo "continue, impressively, to find new ways to present political statements through a gamut of pristine electronics and breakbeats" (CITATION: Future Music, 2007). The fascinating array of guest vocalists included Soweto Kinch, Annette Peacock, Ameri Baraka, and Saul Williams. The latter followed on from Coldcut’s remix of Williams’ ‘The Pledge’ for a project with DJ Spooky. 
A 100-date audiovisual world tour commenced for ‘Sound Mirrors,’ which was considered "no small feat in terms of technology or human effort". Coldcut was accompanied by scratch DJ Raj and AV artist Juxta, in addition to guest vocalists from the album, including UK rapper Juice Aleem, Roots Manuva, Mpho Skeef, Jon Spencer and house legend Robert Owens. 
Three further singles were released from the album including the Top 75 hit "True Skool" with Roots Manuva. The same track appeared on the soundtrack of the video game FIFA Street 2. 
Sponsored by the British Council, in 2005 Coldcut introduced AV mixing to India with the Union project, alongside collaborators Howie B and Aki Nawaz of Fun-Da-Mental. Coldcut created an A/V remix of the Bollywood hit movie ‘Kal Ho Naa Ho’. 
In 2006, Coldcut performed an A/V set based on "Music for 18 Musicians" as part of Steve Reich’s 70th birthday gig at the Barbican Centre in London. 
Coldcut remixed another classic song in 2007: Nina Simone’s ‘Save Me.’ This was part of a remix album called ‘Nina Simone: Remixed & Re-imagined,’ featuring remixes from Tony Humphries, Francois K and Chris Coco. 
In February 2007, Coldcut and Mixmaster Morris created a psychedelic AV obituary/tribute Coldcut, Mixmaster Morris, Ken Campbell, Bill Drummond and Alan Moore (18 March 2007). Robert Anton Wilson tribute show. Queen Elizabeth Hall, London: Mixmaster Morris. (28 August 2009) to Robert Anton Wilson, the 60s author of Illuminatus! Trilogy. The tribute featured graphic novel writer Alan Moore and artist Bill Drummond and a performance by experimental theatre legend Ken Campbell. Coldcut and Morris’ hour and a half performance resembled a documentary being remixed on the fly, cutting up nearly 15 hours’ worth of Wilson’s lectures. 
In 2008, an international group of party organisers, activists and artists including Coldcut received a grant from the Intelligent Energy Department of the European Union, to create a project that promoted intelligent energy and environmental awareness to the youth of Europe. The result was Energy Union, a piece of VJ cinema, political campaign, music tour, party, art exhibition and social media hub. Energy Union toured 12 EU countries throughout 2009 and 2010, completing 24 events in total. Coldcut created the Energy Union show for the tour, a one-hour Audio/Visual montage on the theme of Intelligent Energy. In presenting new ideas for climate, environmental and energy communication strategies, the Energy Union tour was well received, and reached a widespread audience in cities across the UK, Germany, Belgium, The Netherlands, Croatia, Slovenia, Austria, Hungary, Bulgaria, Spain and the Czech Republic. 
Also in 2008, Coldcut was asked to remix the theme song for British cult TV show Doctor Who for the program’s 40th anniversary. In October 2008, Coldcut celebrated the legacy of the BBC Radiophonic Workshop (the place where the Doctor Who theme was created) with a live DJ mix at London’s legendary Roundhouse. The live mix incorporated classic Radiophonic Workshop compositions with extended sampling of the original gear. 
Additionally in 2008, Coldcut remixed "Ourselves", a Japanese #1 hit from the single "&" by Ayumi Hamasaki. This mix was included on the album Ayu-mi-x 6: Gold. 
Starting in 2009, Matt Black, with musician/artist/coder Paul Miller (creator of the TX Modular Open Source synth), developed Granul8, a new type of visual fx/source Black termed a ‘granular video synthesiser’. Granul8 allows the use of realtime VJ techniques including video feedback combined with VDMX VJ software. 
From 2009 onwards, Black has been collaborating with coder and psychedelic mathematician William Rood to create a forthcoming project called Liveloom, a social media AV mixer. 
In 2010, Coldcut celebrated 20 years of releasing music with its label, Ninja Tune. A book entitled Ninja Tune: 20 Years of Beats and Pieces was released on 12 August 2010, and an exhibition was held at Black Dog Publishing's Black Dog Space in London, showcasing artwork, design and photography from the label's 20-year history. A compilation album was released on 20 September in two formats: a regular version consisting of two 2-disc volumes, and a limited edition which contained six CDs, six 7" vinyl singles, a hardback copy of the book, a poster and additional items. Ninja Tune also incorporated a series of international parties. This repositioned Ninja as a continually compelling and influential label, being one of the "longest-running (and successful) UK indie labels to come out of the late-1980s/early-90s explosion in dance music and hip-hop" (Pitchfork, 28 September 2010). Pitchfork claimed it had a "right to show off a little". 
In July 2013, Coldcut produced a piece entitled ‘D’autre’ based on the writings of French poet Arthur Rimbaud, for Forum Des Images in Paris.The following month, in August, Coldcut produced a new soundtrack for a section of André Sauvage’s classic film Études sur Paris, which was shown as part of Noise of Art at the BFI in London, which celebrated 100 years of Electronic Music and Silent Cinema. Coldcut put new music to films from the Russolo era, incorporating original recordings of Russolo's proto-synths. 
In April 2013, Coldcut released Ninja Jamm, an iOS music app, in collaboration with London-based technology crew Seeper. Initially, the app allowed users to purchase and remix ‘Tunepacks’ of original tracks by Coldcut and other Ninja artists. These packs became part of the Ninja Tune release schedule, often being released simultaneously with traditional formats. Ninja Jamm was featured on the New and Noteworthy section of the App Store on release, and has received over 300,000 downloads to date. 
The powerful, ‘intuitive yet deep,’ app allowed users significant scope to play with, edit and re-work Ninja releases. Coldcut used it in their DJ sets, constantly improving and updating it. 
In summer 2015, Ninja Jamm and Loopmasters launched ‘Samplepacks,’ containing genre specific samples and turning Ninja Jamm into a powerful, original music creation app. Users are now able to turn instruments on and off, swap between clips, add glitches and effects, trigger and pitch-bend stabs and one-off samples, and change the tempo of the track under touch control. Users can additionally record as they play and instantly share their jamms via Soundcloud, Facebook and other means. 
To date over 20 tunepacks have been released, including Amon Tobin, Bonobo, Coldcut, DJ Food, Lapalux, Machinedrum, Congo Natty, Irresistible Force, FaltyDL and many more, and in July 2015 it is planned to release the app on Android. 
In 2013, Coldcut began working on a new album, collaborating with producer Dave Taylor (a.k.a. Solid Groove a.k.a. Switch). As of Summer 2015, this latest chapter in their legendary catalogue is nearing completion. 
Ninja Tune turns 25 in 2015. Coldcut founded the label to release the future-gazing music that excited them, and to do so without boundaries, and based purely on its quality and originality. The label’s remit remains exactly that, a quarter of a century later. 
And Coldcut themselves are as irrepressible as ever. Lauded as the number 3 DJs of all time by Music Radar, in recent months they’ve contributed an original, interactive, cutup installation for one of their creative precursors, William Burroughs, at his ‘Animals in the Wall’ exhibition. 
Their long term relationship with Greenpeace continued with DJ sets for the organization at Glastonbury for the last two years. In the same vein, ‘Everything is Under Control’ was used for ‘The Revolution with be Televised,’ the BBS activist comedy show broadcast in 2013. Matt Black has found a natural calling giving talks and lectures at events and teaching establishments, his long-standing political activism finding itself in renewed demand in turbulent times. 
And coming soon will be a brand new studio album, which will see Coldcut back in the vanguard of electronic music, and collaborating with some of the best musical mavericks from around the world – a group they’ve long been counted amongst.
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Drawing from a wide range of tropical riddims and urban electro, the power of Montreal-based DJ/producer Poirier's bass blasts through any flimsy attempt to classify his music. Pinpointing the bits and pieces of dancehall beats, soca energy and electronic intensity is futile in the face of Poirier's dance-driven creativity and air-horn worthy excitement. Signed to Ninja Tune, this is a man who just understands what works in the dance.

Poirier is constantly evolving. Landscapes of vibrant drums lead to pulsating, pitch-shifting, and infectious bass and synth patterns. He tears through new genres constantly, leaving a trail of packed, chaotic dancefloors in his wake. From his legendary Bounce Le Gros parties in Montreal (sell out events for two years running) to his new party, the bigger, better, bass-ier Karnival, Poirier has been unstoppable in his ability to mash styles, expand minds, and move asses.

Although based in Montreal, Poirier is also always moving — in just the past few years he has been invited to virtually every continent. Poirier on the bill equals a sure fire jam, so it's no surprise that he's shared the stage with Modeselektor, Diplo, Kode9, Amon Tobin and Toddla T, as well as taken SXSW, Fabric London, Australia's Big Day Out, the Montreux Jazz Festival, and Mexico's Cervantino Festival by storm.

Poirier's signature skill of effortlessly linking disparate genres has led to worldwide collaborations with MCs and DJs from global hip hop, soca, grime, dancehall, booty bass, and much more. Electro sensations Crookers, dancehall veteran Burro Banton, the ever-eclectic DJ/rupture, London's tough gyal Warrior Queen, and Trinidadian soca master Mr. Slaughter have all connected with Poirier, as well as longtime collaborators Face-T and MC Zulu.

Remixes are part of Poirier's powerful repertoire, and he knows just how to pick apart a song and put it back together bigger and heavier than before. Tracks by Gotan Project, Tommie Sunshine, Pole, Bassnectar and Yoav have all been given the Poirier treatment, garnering him attention from publications such as the Independent, the London Telegraph, Pitchfork, the New Yorker, the Wire and XLR8R.

Every Poirier release presents a new, yet equally slammin', perspective. The critically acclaimed 'Breakupdown' (2005) and 'No Ground Under' (2008) were warm ups for 2009's cavalcade of dancehall-soca-electro EPs, culminating in the latest collection of bangers, 'Running High'.

Giving the massive what it wants, yet providing a musical education in what it needs, Poirier is a producer and DJ who has no boundaries except, perhaps, the rule that it's gotta have bass, and it's got to bounce. With this philosophy, Poirier will keep the dance rammed.

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Drawing from a wide range of tropical riddims and urban electro, the power of Montreal-based DJ/producer Poirier's bass blasts through any flimsy attempt to classify his music. Pinpointing the bits and pieces of dancehall beats, soca energy and electronic intensity is futile in the face of Poirier's dance-driven creativity and air-horn worthy excitement. Signed to Ninja Tune, this is a man who just understands what works in the dance.

Poirier is constantly evolving. Landscapes of vibrant drums lead to pulsating, pitch-shifting, and infectious bass and synth patterns. He tears through new genres constantly, leaving a trail of packed, chaotic dancefloors in his wake. From his legendary Bounce Le Gros parties in Montreal (sell out events for two years running) to his new party, the bigger, better, bass-ier Karnival, Poirier has been unstoppable in his ability to mash styles, expand minds, and move asses.

Although based in Montreal, Poirier is also always moving — in just the past few years he has been invited to virtually every continent. Poirier on the bill equals a sure fire jam, so it's no surprise that he's shared the stage with Modeselektor, Diplo, Kode9, Amon Tobin and Toddla T, as well as taken SXSW, Fabric London, Australia's Big Day Out, the Montreux Jazz Festival, and Mexico's Cervantino Festival by storm.

Poirier's signature skill of effortlessly linking disparate genres has led to worldwide collaborations with MCs and DJs from global hip hop, soca, grime, dancehall, booty bass, and much more. Electro sensations Crookers, dancehall veteran Burro Banton, the ever-eclectic DJ/rupture, London's tough gyal Warrior Queen, and Trinidadian soca master Mr. Slaughter have all connected with Poirier, as well as longtime collaborators Face-T and MC Zulu.

Remixes are part of Poirier's powerful repertoire, and he knows just how to pick apart a song and put it back together bigger and heavier than before. Tracks by Gotan Project, Tommie Sunshine, Pole, Bassnectar and Yoav have all been given the Poirier treatment, garnering him attention from publications such as the Independent, the London Telegraph, Pitchfork, the New Yorker, the Wire and XLR8R.

Every Poirier release presents a new, yet equally slammin', perspective. The critically acclaimed 'Breakupdown' (2005) and 'No Ground Under' (2008) were warm ups for 2009's cavalcade of dancehall-soca-electro EPs, culminating in the latest collection of bangers, 'Running High'.

Giving the massive what it wants, yet providing a musical education in what it needs, Poirier is a producer and DJ who has no boundaries except, perhaps, the rule that it's gotta have bass, and it's got to bounce. With this philosophy, Poirier will keep the dance rammed.

[links_clean] =>

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Busdriver is fixed as one of LA music’s most dynamic indie artist. From his years as a cyher phenom at Project Blowed to his years as a recording artist on Epitaph to his current role as co-head of Hellfyre Club, Busdriver has always challenged rap in the most particular and thoughful of ways.

BD’s first record, Memoirs of the Elephantman, was self released thru Afterlife records (a Project Blowed subcrew at the time)in 1999. Not until his second self-released record, Temporary Forever, came out in 2002 did Busdriver step on the world stage. Sleeper hit "Imaginary Places" turned him into one of many beacons of left-leaning hip-hop at the moment. During this time he was also emceeing at the Hiphop/Drum’n’bass night weekly Concrete Jungle with Daddy Kev, Myka 9, edit and DJ Hive.

After the new success of Temporary Forever, Busdriver signed with Mush records to do a collaborative album with beat/production guru Daedelus and quirky rap talent Radioinactive in 2003. The project was called ‘The Weather’. Their album toyed with daring disjointed production and dexterous rap writing in a way that Busdriver hadn’t in the past. The project amassed a small cult following all its own and aligned Driver’s taste with the output of LA’s electronic music scene.

In 2004, Busdriver began his relationship with Big Dada by releasing with them the Daddy Kev-produced mini-LP, Cosmic Cleavage. This was followed by Busdriver’s official 3rd album, Fear of a Black Tangent, released via Big Dada in the EU and on Mush in the US.

Busdriver’s label dealings grew outside of the rap arena in 2007 when he signed to indie-punk mega-label Epitaph and eventually, it’s more indie-music driven sister label, Anti-. Through them he released RoadKillOvercoat in 2007 and Jhellibeam in 2009. Both albums featured production from DJ Nobody, Nosaj Thing, Free the Robots and Boom Bip. During these years, rap producer culture was in flux in LA and the newly founded Low End Theory began gaining momentum. Producer eDIT (who becomes the head of Glitch Mob) featured Busdriver on "Crunk De Gaulle" (also featuring TTC) off his Alpha Pup debut, Certified Air Raid Material.

Computer Cooties came out in 2010 after BD parted with Anti-. It was a free mixtape featuring collaborations with Flying Lotus, Anti-Pop Consortium, Sister Crayon, Daedelus and Open Mike Eagle. He followed this by joining Hellfyre Club and forming Flash Bang Grenada, a two-man group made of Nocando (founder of Hellfyre Club and original resident of Low End Theory) and himself, created solely to let their musings on popular rap themes run amok. They released their debut 10 Haters in 2011.

In 2012, BD released Beaus$Eros through Fake Four. The album was produced entirely by Loden and had features from Cocorosie and Mike Ladd. It was a departure from rap writing into microclimates of experimental pop but then completely not also. The record was coupled with Regan Farquhar aka Busdriver(Driver) fronting an progressive power pop outfit briefly called Physiccal Forms.

That same year Driver released Arguments with Dreams, an EP marking a return to Big Dada. It was mostly self-produced with stand-out appearances from Das Racist on “Firehydrant” and HFC members Nocando and Mike Eagle on “Wernor Herzog”.

In 2013, Driver helmed and oversaw the production of Dorner Vs. Tookie, the joint mixtape featuring efforts from all the members of Hellfyre Club (Nocando, Busdriver, Open Mike Eagle, milo, Rheteric Ramirez, Kail, VerBS, Taurus Scott, The Kleerz). While doing this Busdriver completed his 8th proper studio album, Perfect Hair. The album features production from Mono/Poly, Jeremiah Jae, Great Dane, Kenny Segal and Riley Lake with guest performances from Danny Brown, Aesop Rock and Mike Eagle. A follow up mixtape from Hellfyre Club in collaboration with producer collective Team Supreme is planned for 2014. But it is only it is pre-production stages now.

More recently Driver has done collaborations with Modeselektor, Son Lux, Latyrx, Kool AD, Lapalux, Sonnymoon, P.O.S, and others on various albums.

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Busdriver is fixed as one of LA music’s most dynamic indie artist. From his years as a cyher phenom at Project Blowed to his years as a recording artist on Epitaph to his current role as co-head of Hellfyre Club, Busdriver has always challenged rap in the most particular and thoughful of ways.

BD’s first record, Memoirs of the Elephantman, was self released thru Afterlife records (a Project Blowed subcrew at the time)in 1999. Not until his second self-released record, Temporary Forever, came out in 2002 did Busdriver step on the world stage. Sleeper hit "Imaginary Places" turned him into one of many beacons of left-leaning hip-hop at the moment. During this time he was also emceeing at the Hiphop/Drum’n’bass night weekly Concrete Jungle with Daddy Kev, Myka 9, edit and DJ Hive.

After the new success of Temporary Forever, Busdriver signed with Mush records to do a collaborative album with beat/production guru Daedelus and quirky rap talent Radioinactive in 2003. The project was called ‘The Weather’. Their album toyed with daring disjointed production and dexterous rap writing in a way that Busdriver hadn’t in the past. The project amassed a small cult following all its own and aligned Driver’s taste with the output of LA’s electronic music scene.

In 2004, Busdriver began his relationship with Big Dada by releasing with them the Daddy Kev-produced mini-LP, Cosmic Cleavage. This was followed by Busdriver’s official 3rd album, Fear of a Black Tangent, released via Big Dada in the EU and on Mush in the US.

Busdriver’s label dealings grew outside of the rap arena in 2007 when he signed to indie-punk mega-label Epitaph and eventually, it’s more indie-music driven sister label, Anti-. Through them he released RoadKillOvercoat in 2007 and Jhellibeam in 2009. Both albums featured production from DJ Nobody, Nosaj Thing, Free the Robots and Boom Bip. During these years, rap producer culture was in flux in LA and the newly founded Low End Theory began gaining momentum. Producer eDIT (who becomes the head of Glitch Mob) featured Busdriver on "Crunk De Gaulle" (also featuring TTC) off his Alpha Pup debut, Certified Air Raid Material.

Computer Cooties came out in 2010 after BD parted with Anti-. It was a free mixtape featuring collaborations with Flying Lotus, Anti-Pop Consortium, Sister Crayon, Daedelus and Open Mike Eagle. He followed this by joining Hellfyre Club and forming Flash Bang Grenada, a two-man group made of Nocando (founder of Hellfyre Club and original resident of Low End Theory) and himself, created solely to let their musings on popular rap themes run amok. They released their debut 10 Haters in 2011.

In 2012, BD released Beaus$Eros through Fake Four. The album was produced entirely by Loden and had features from Cocorosie and Mike Ladd. It was a departure from rap writing into microclimates of experimental pop but then completely not also. The record was coupled with Regan Farquhar aka Busdriver(Driver) fronting an progressive power pop outfit briefly called Physiccal Forms.

That same year Driver released Arguments with Dreams, an EP marking a return to Big Dada. It was mostly self-produced with stand-out appearances from Das Racist on “Firehydrant” and HFC members Nocando and Mike Eagle on “Wernor Herzog”.

In 2013, Driver helmed and oversaw the production of Dorner Vs. Tookie, the joint mixtape featuring efforts from all the members of Hellfyre Club (Nocando, Busdriver, Open Mike Eagle, milo, Rheteric Ramirez, Kail, VerBS, Taurus Scott, The Kleerz). While doing this Busdriver completed his 8th proper studio album, Perfect Hair. The album features production from Mono/Poly, Jeremiah Jae, Great Dane, Kenny Segal and Riley Lake with guest performances from Danny Brown, Aesop Rock and Mike Eagle. A follow up mixtape from Hellfyre Club in collaboration with producer collective Team Supreme is planned for 2014. But it is only it is pre-production stages now.

More recently Driver has done collaborations with Modeselektor, Son Lux, Latyrx, Kool AD, Lapalux, Sonnymoon, P.O.S, and others on various albums.

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Helena Hauff returns to Werkdiscs/Ninja Tune with a 5-track EP Lex Tertia - her first for the imprint since 2013's Actio Reactio. Released 30th March 2015 on 12" and digital formats. In her won words: "Lex Tertia is a further exploration into the idea of grimy, sonically crushed, dysfunctional, insane stuff that kicks on where Actio Reactio left off."

[links] => [image_upload_id] => 20668 [label_id] => 10 [twitter_username] => [instagram_id] => [instagram_username] => [link] => [listed] => 1 [sortname] => Helena Hauff [created] => 2013-06-17 10:29:24 [modified] => 2015-03-10 12:21:47 [slug] => helena-hauff [fuga_id] => [description_clean] =>

Helena Hauff returns to Werkdiscs/Ninja Tune with a 5-track EP Lex Tertia - her first for the imprint since 2013's Actio Reactio. Released 30th March 2015 on 12" and digital formats. In her won words: "Lex Tertia is a further exploration into the idea of grimy, sonically crushed, dysfunctional, insane stuff that kicks on where Actio Reactio left off."

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Artist Date City Venue Buy
Floating Points Friday, Aug 2nd Montreal, Quebec, CA Osheaga Music and Arts Festival
Bonobo (DJ Set) Friday, Aug 2nd Rochester, NY, US Pearl Nightclub
Floating Points Friday, Aug 2nd Chicago, IL, US Smart Bar Buy
DJ Food and Coldcut Friday, Aug 2nd London, GB The Half Moon Buy
Machinedrum Friday, Aug 2nd Montreal, CA LA SAT Buy
Lukid Friday, Aug 2nd Cavertitz, DE Nachtdigital Buy
DJ Food, DK and Jon More Friday, Aug 2nd London, GB Half Moon Public House Buy
Poirier Friday, Aug 2nd Montreal, CA Cabaret Underworld
Busdriver Friday, Aug 2nd Los Angeles, US Echoplex
Helena Hauff Friday, Aug 2nd Olganitz, DE Nachtdigital
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